Skip to main content

Full text of "Annual report"

See other formats


RULES AND REGULATIONS 

— OF THE — 

FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, 
IPSWICH 



The library will be open every afternoon, except Sundays, Mondays and 
Holidays, from 2 to 6 ; and Wednesday and Saturday evenings from 7 to 9. 

II 
Adult residents of Ipswich are entitled to draw books by filling out 
application blanks. Minors must obtain the signature of parent or guar- 
dian. 

Ill 
Two or more books may be taken out at a time by adults, but only 
one of these may be fiction. Children may take only two books. 

IV 

Cards will be issued to teachers, clergymen, members of study clubs, 
and other special students on which books of non-fiction needed for special 
study may be taken and kept four weeks. 

V 

Books may be kept two weeks (unless labelled Seven day book), and 
may be renewed once for the same length of time. 

Books marked Seven day book cannot be renewed. 

VI 

The last issue of any magazine cannot be taken from the library. 

VII 

A fine of two cents a day (Sundays, Mondays and legal holidays 
excepted) will be imposed on books kept over time, and no other book will 
be delivered to the person incurring the fine until it is paid. 

VIII 

All writing or marking on books, and all injuries beyond a reasonable 
wear shall be promptly adjusted to the satisfaction of the librarian. A book 
lost must be replaced by the loser. 

IX 
No arrangement for the transfer of a book by the holder or by the 
librarian will be allowed. 

X 
All persons visiting the library will be required to demean themselves 
in a quiet, orderly manner, and no loud or continued conversation will be 
allowed. 



1G34 1917 

REPORT 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 



OF 



IPSWICH, MASS., 




For the Year Ending December 31, 1916 

And The 

Two Hundred and Eighty-third Year of the 

Town's Incorporation. 



IPSWICH, MASS.: 
GEO. A. SCHOFIELD & SON, PRINTERS. 

*dB£ffc 686 

1917 



°in¥'A-* 






smn 




IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



TOWN OFFICERS, 1916. 

SELECTMEN. 

Frank W. Kyes, Chairman. 

John A. Brown George E. Hodgkins 

ASSESSORS. 

John W. Nourse, Chairman. 

Richard R. Glasier - William B. Richards 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Frank T. Goodhue, Chairman. 

Charles G. Hull, Agent Walter F. Gould 

TOWN CLERK. 

Charles W. Bamford. 

TREASURER AND COLLECTOR. 

Chester W. Bamford William J. Riley, Assistant 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Herbert W. Mason, Chairman, 

Howard N. Doughty, Secretary George E. MacArthur 

Joseph W. Ross William J. Riley Luther Wait 

REGISTRARS OF VOTERS. 

Charles H. Glasier, Chairman Charles W. Bamford, Clerk 

Lyman H. Daniels Frank H. Girard 

AUDITOR. 
Arthur H. Walton. 

ACCOUNTANT. 

Frederick S. Witham. 

CONSTABLE. 

Wesley B. Atkinson 

MUNICIPAL WATER AND LIGHTING COMMISSION. 

George A. Schofield, Chairman, 
George H. W. Hayes William H. Rand 

BOARD OF HEALTH. 

George E. MacArthur, Chairman Aaron Lord, Agent 

George W. Smith, Milk Inspector 

PARK COMMISSIONERS. 
Frank T. Goodhue, Chairman James A, Morey Chan j H. Wells 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS, 
Philip E. Clarke, Chairman Howard Blake Edmund J. M. Scahill 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



SUPT. MOTH SUPPRESSION DEPT. AND TREE WARDEN. 

James A. Morey, 

POUND KEEPERS. 
Albert P. Hills D. Sidney Perley 

FENCE VIEWERS. 
W'arren Boynton Aaron Lord George H. Green 

SURVEYORS OF LUMBER AND MEASURERS OF WOOD 
Joseph F. Austin William J. Norwood 

BURIAL AGENT. 
Philip E. Clarke. 

JANITOR OF TOWN HALL AND KEEPER OF LOCKUP. 

A'onzo L. Brown. 

CHIEF OF POLICE, 
John F. Dupray. 

TOWN COUNSEL. 
Albert F. Welsh. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS, 

Joseph A. Huckins. 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

William A. Stone. 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS, 
E. Newton Brown. 

ENGINEERS FIRE DEPARTMENT. 
Arthur H. Walton, Chief, Walter G. Brown, Clerk, Edwin M. Poole. 

FOREST WARDEN, 

Arthur H. Walton, 

PUBLIC WEIGHER. 

AlonzoL. Brown. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

Charles M. Kelly, Chairman, Jesse H. Wade, Secretary, Jeremiah 

Campbell, Thomas R. Lord, Albert Jodrey, Eben Moulton, 

Fred A. Kimball, S. Foster Damon, Charles S. Garrette 

MODERATOR. 

Charles E. Goodhue. 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



DEPARTMENTAL. 

SELECTMEN. 



SALARIES AND WAGES. 




Paid to 




Frank W Kyes, 


$200 08 


John A Brown, 


125 00 


George E Hodgkins, 


104 10 


Chas G Hull. 


20 82 


OTHER EXPENSES. 




Paid to 




W N Prescott, supplies (1915), 


$ 88 


J H Lakeman, P. M., envelopes, 


12 23 


Hobbs & Warren, blanks, 


1 10 


Chas G Hull, printing. 


56 00 


Ipswich Chronicle, printing, 


268 22 


Ipswich Chronicle, printing, (1915) 


. 4 80 


Edward C Brooks, adv., 


8 00 


Essex Bookbindery, binding reports, 


50 86 


D A Grady, team, 


4 00 



$450 00 



6 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Paid to 
New England Tel & Tel Co., telephone, 

" " " " " (1915) 

City of Beverly, wire inspection, 

" " " " " (1915) 

Wesley B Atkinson, posting warrants, 
John E Dodge, ringing bell. 
John F Wippich, care town clock (1915) 
W E Dupray, Agent, moth liability insurance, 
Horace Ellsworth, distributing reports 
Edw Martel, 
Chester Brocklebank, 
Wm H Burnham, 
W L Augur, 
Henry Churchill, 
Harold Poor, 
Chas E Poor 
Albert E Elwell, 
John A Blake, supplies, 
American Express Co., express, 
H B McArdle, supplies, 

Jesse H Wade, secretary Finance Committee, 
D A Grady, team for constable, 
S D Dodge, auto for constable, 
J F Dupray, dog officer and killing dogs, 
Adeline M Waters, clean up week expense, 
Jas H Hull, painting 
Albert F Welsh, legal expenses, 
C Amazeen & Co., supplies, 
Walter F Gould, auctioneer, 
F W Martin Co., engrossing resolutions, 
Geo H W Hayes, drawing deed and expense, 
Edw Leavitt, killing dogs, 
Chas H Wells, labor, 
V H Grant, killing dog, 



$230 40 


17 15 


222 00 


45 50 


45 00 


41 60 


25 00 


102 67 


2 00 


2 00 


2 00 


2 00 


2 00 


2 00 


2 00 


2 00 


2 50 


3 50 


7 40 


6 46 


50 00 


4 00 


8 00 


14 00 


8 75 


2 50 


69 60 


7 00 


15 00 


10 00 


25 95 


3 00 


4 50 


1 00 


• 



$1394 57 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



MODERATOR. 
Paid to 
Chas E Goodhue, 


$20 00 


$20 00 




$1700 00 
93 33 

75 00 


Total expenditures. 
Unexpended balance, - 


$1864 57 
3 76 


Appropriation, 

Appropriation for 1915 unpaid bills, 

Transfer from Reserve Fund, 


$1868 33 
$1868 33 


AUDITING AND ACCOUNTING. 

SALARIES. 
Paid to 
Arthur H. Walton, auditor, $ 150 00 
Frederick S. Witham, accountant, 1000 00 



OTHER EXPENSES. 
Paid to 
Charles G Hull, printing, 

H B McArdle, office supplies, 

Dal ton Adding Machine Co., adding machine, 

" supplies, 
Ipswich Chronicle, paper, 
General Fireproofing Co., file and supplies, 
H M Meserve Co., repairing, 
Arthur H Walton, car fare and expense, 
American Express Co., express. 
C F Chapman & Son, trip book, 



$ 18 00 


11 79 


152 00 


37 


1 00 


24 65 


3 25 


3 00 


1 36 


2 40 



$1150 00 



$217 82 



Total expenditures, $1367 82 

Unexpended balance, 2 18 



$1370 00 
Appropriation, $1370 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR. 



SALARIES AND WAGES. 

Paid to 
Chester W. Bamford, Treasurer and Collector, 
Wm J Riley, Assistant, 

" Treasurer and Collector, 
W Mason Riley, clerical work, 

OTHER EXPENSES. 
Paid to 
J H Lakeman, P. M,, envelopes 
Ipswich Chronicle, printing, 
First National Bank, checks, 
H M Meserve Co., supplies, 
H B McArdle, supplies, 
Peoples Express Co., express, 
Bureau of Statistics, certification of notes, 
G A Barker, bonds, 
General Fireproofing Co., supplies, 
American Express Co., express, 
Dalton Adding Machine Co., supplies, 



Total expenditures, 
Appropriation, 



$733 26 




300 00 




43 41 




12 00 






$1088 67 




$159 30 




26 70 




23 09 




25 




7 00 




25 




12 00 




346 83 




34 45 




46 




1 00 






$611 33 






$1700 00 




$1700 00 



ASSESSORS. 

SALARIES AND WAGES. 



Paid to 
John W Nourse, 
Richard R Glasier, 
Wm B Richards, 



$300 00 
100 00 
100 00 



$500 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 9 

OTHER EXPENSES. ' 

Paid to 
J H Lakeman, P. M,. envelopes, $10 63 

Hobbs & Warren, blanks, 9 00 

J W Nourse, copying book for Tax Commissioner, 37 50 
Wakefield Daily Item, blanks, 
Wright & Potter Co., blanks, 
Ipswich Chronicle, printing, 
Charles G. Hull, printing, 
F S Witham, car fare and expense, 
C F Chapman & Son, trip book, 
J W Nourse, car fare and expense. 
American Express Co., express, 
Lilla D Stott, abstracts of deeds, 
Diebold Safe & Lock Co., safe, 
E Wentworth Prescott, tax information, 
Wm B Richards, use of team. 

" " car fare and expense, 



Total expenditures, 
Unexpended balance, 



Appropriation, 
Appropriation for safe, 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 

SALARIES AND WAGES. 
Paid to 
Albert F Welsh, Town Counsel, $50 00 

Harry M Sayward, Town Gounsel, 33 33 



6 25 




1 65 




• €7 25 




2 50 




2 55 




1 20 




5 25 




29 




41 45 




375 00 




88 50 




18 50 




1 75 




- — . 


- $669 32 




$1169 32 




5 68 




$1175 00 


$800 00 




375 00 




- - - 


$1175 00 



$83 33 



OTHER EXPENSES. 
Paid to 
Harry M Sayward, legal services, $103 84 



10 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Paid to 
Geo H W Hayes, legal services, 
Albert F, Welsh, 
Amelia M Clarke, typewriting", 
Laura G Murray, 



Total expenditures, 
Unexpended balance, 



Appropriation, 

Appropriation 1915 unpaid bills. 

Transfer from Reserve Fund, 



$ 15 00 

273 20 

11 07 

15 00 


$418 11 






$501 44 
2 40 


$325 00 

53 84 

125 00 


$503 84 



TOWN CLERK. 
SALARIES AND WAGES. 

Paid to 
Charles W Bamford, Town Clerk, 

OTHER EXPENSES. 
Paid to 
W N Prescott, supplies (1915) 
Ipswich Chronicle, printing, 
P B Murphy, blanks, 
H M Meserve & Co., blanks, 
Philip E Clarke, returning deaths, 
M C McGinley, M. D., birth returns, 
Chas W Bamford, recording and indexing births, 

marriages and deaths, 
Geo G Bailey, M. D., birth returns, 



$250 00 



$ 1 20 


20 50 


7 20 


2 50 


19 75 


5 75 


94 10 


26 50 



$250 00 



$177 50 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 11 



Total expenditures, 
Unexpended balance, 



Appropriation, 

Appropriation for 1915 unpaid bill, 



ELECTION AND REGISTRATION. 

SALARIES AND WAGES. 





$427 50 




33 70 




$461 20 


$460 00 




1 20 






$461 20 



Paid to 








Chas H Glasier, 


Registrar, 




$50 00 


Chas W Bamford, 


i ( 




50 00 


Frank H Girard, 


i c 




50 00 


Lyman H Daniels, 


< * 




48 33 


James Damon 


%( 




16 66 


<< t < 


• < 


(1915) 


33 34 


Frank H Girard, 


ELECTION OFFICERS. 


33 33 






Paid to 








Stephen R Harris, 






$20 00 


George W Smith, 






20 00 


Oscar F Thompson, 






17 00 


J Frank Austin, 






14 00 


George A Schof.eld, 


Jr., 




20 00 


Willis L Augur, 






20 00 


Andrew McGinley, 






13 50 


John H Peatfield, 






14 00 


Frank H Girard, 




• 


11 50 


Charles C Canney, 






7 00 


Carl Copp, 






7 00 


Junius Avery, 






3 50 


John W Mansfield, 






3 50 


Charles V Hills, 






3 50 



$281 66 



12 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Paid to 
Michael Judge, 
W Malcolm Atkinson, 
Leslie Dupray, 
George A Schofield, 
Albert F Welsh. 
Daniel McKinnon, 
Gordon Player, 
Frank W Kyes, 
John A Brown, 
George E Hodgkins, 
Walter G Brown, 
Charles S Grant, 
Henry Brown, 
Arthur H Tozer. 
Wilbur E Dupray. 
Carlton Crafts, 
James E Gallagher, 
John R Morris, 
George H W Hayes, 
Daniel J Marlin, 



$ 3 50 


10 50 


3 50 


7 00 


3 50 


3 50 


10 50 


15 00 


10 00 


15 00 


8 00 


7 00 


3 50 


3 50 


3 50 


3 50 


3 50 


3 50 


3 50 


2 00 



$298 00 



OTHER EXPENSES, 
Paid to 
W N Prescott, supplies (1915) 
Fred R Hull, printing, 
Ipswich Chronicle, printing, 
H A Russell, meals, 
Hayes & Schofield, legal services, 
Arthur Bishop, serving writ, 



Total expenditures. 
Unexpended balance, 



$ 85 




5 00 




73 25 




17 70 




18 50 




12 28 






$127 58 






$707 24 




10 28 



$717 52 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 13 

Appropriation, $500 00 

Appropriation unpaid 1915 bills, 67 52 

Transfer from Reserve Fund, 150 00 

$717 52 



TOWN HALL. 

Paid to 

Alonzo L Brown, janitor, $600 00 

Albert S Garland, " 47 65 

Chester Scahill, labor, 3 00 

Wm H Jewett, labor, 75 

Chas L Lovell, fuel, 102 37 

George Fall, fuel, 87 08 

Lathrop Bros., fuel, 62 00 

A H Peatfield, fuel, 72 57 

Electric Light Dept., light, 362 10 

Dustbane Mfg Co., dustbane, 10 50 

W N Prescott, supplies (1915) 50 

Chas L Lovell, cement 22 55 

Walter G Brown, bricks and sand, 67 00 

Canney Lumber Co., lumber, 16 15 

(1915) 3 8S 

John W Goodhue, supplies, 43 26 

" " " " (1915) 4 57 

C H Brooks, plumbing, 12 35 

Austin L Lord, labor, 161 37 

Clarence Cheever, repairs, 7 50 

Hayes Bros., plumbing, 7 94 

Manzer & Damon, repairs, 66 86 

Joseph A King, repairs, 3 35 

Elmer C Smith, painting, 17 45 

J E Greene, carpentry, 27 30 

A S Wonson, electric wiring, 1>65 20 

R L Purinton, plumbing, 13 59 

James A Rogers, plumbing, 5 75 



14 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

Paid to 
J J Merrill, wiring, 
Alonzo L Brown, laundry, 
New England Tel & Tel Co., telephone, 
Geo B Robbins Co., disinfectant, 
Electric Light Dept. labor and fixtuies (1915) 
Water Dept., water, 

(1915) 
A C Damon, supplies, 
Peoples Express, Inc., express, 
James F Perkins, labor, 
Frank W Kyes, cash paid out, 
F R Schaller piano tuning, 
Henry Bushek, inspection, 
F B Mitchell, painting signs, 
Cogswell & Safford, insurance, 
Geo A Schofield, Jr., insurance, 
R W Ward, plants, 
Total expenditures, 
Unexpended balance, 



Appropriation, 

Appropriation for unpaid 1915 bills, 



$ 9 81 




7 65 




66 60 




25 00 




60 06 




16 44 




7 66 




16 25 




35 




1 00 




50 




8 00 




4 00 




8 85 




20 60 




34 00 




13 20 






$2394 54 






19 23 




$2413 77 


$2300 00 




113 77 







-$2413 77 



PROTECTION OF PERSONvS AND PROPERTY. 

POLICE DEPARTMEN T. 

SALARIES AND WAGES. 
Paid to 
John F Dupray, chief, $1000 00 

Daniel H Wells, " 180 56 

" " " " (1915) 9 50 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 15 



Paid to 
Valorous H Grant, patrolman, 
Clifford C Boylan, 
Edward Leavitt, 
Frank C Hull, 
Elmer C Smith, special, 
Wm H Jewett, 
Wm H Goditt, 
Herbert Whittier, " 



OTHER EXPENSES. 



Paid to 



$849 25 


684 00 


652 25 


196 00 


168 00 


191 75 


8 25 


30 00 



S D Dodge, auto hire, $ 3 00 

W E Dupray, auto hire, 8 00 

Mechanical service station, auto hire, 1 50 

C F Chapman & Son, supplies, 7 25 

(1915) 30 

John W Goodhue, supplies, 1 50 

New England Tel & Tel Co., telephone, 24 96 

" " " " " (1915) 2 01 

Alonzo L Brown, keeper of lockup, 62 00 

Wm H Jewett, " ".'•'" 46 00 

American Express Co., express, 78 

J H Lakeman, P. M., stamps, 2 00 

Chas H Bartlett, services, 5 00 

Geo G Dexter, photographs (1915) 32 50 

Ella M Goodhue, boat hire, 1 50 

Geo H Demore, meals, 12 05 

D G Dimitroff, meals, 13 75 

(1915), 2 65 

B J Conley, medicine (1915), 50 

The Traffic Sign Co., signs, 13 25 

C S Tyler, supplies, 7 56 

Ipswich Chronicle printing, 4 75 

Measures Co., supplies, 30 



$3969 56 



16 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

Paid to 
M C McGinley, M, D., services, 
Chas G Hull, printing, 



Total expenditures, 
Unexpended balance, 



Appropriation, 

Appropriation 1915 unpaid bills, 

Transfer from Reserve Fund, 



5 15 




5 00 






$263 26 






$4232 82 




54 




$4233 36 


$4000 00 




48 36 




185 00 







$4233 36 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

SALARIES AND WAGES. 
Paid to 

Engineers, $200 00 

Hose Co, No. 1 and H & L Co,, 1083 34 

Hose Co, No. 2., . 320 00 

John R Morris, janitor, 300 00 

Raymond Dodge, labor, 12 50 

W L Stone, " 1 00 

Thos R Roberts, " 2 50 

Edward H Smith, driver Hose No. 2, 858 00 

A F Burnham, assistant driver Hose No. 2, 212 75 

Fred C Rust, engineer, 25 CO 

Chester Patch, services, 87 58 

John R Morris, sub-fireman, 16 66 

Wm H Goditt, still alarm, 1 00 

C J Dupray, " " 1 50 

G L Fall, ".".'" 25 

Raymond Dodge, ": 1 25 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



17 



Paid to 








A Norwood, 


still 


alarm, 


$ 1 00 


Chester Patch, 


< < 


♦• 


1 00 


Charles Mallard, 


< « 


< < 


50 


W F Poole, 


a 


< < 


25 


E P Murray, 
Charles Dort, 


i « 
i < 


« « 
1 1 


25 

75 


J A Huckins, 


i i 


<« 


25 


John Burns, 


it 


t < 


25 


W S Atherley, 
Frank Scahill, 


1 1 
• < 




75 
50 


Albert Chapman, 
Junius Avery, 


<< 


« < 


50 

75 


Walter Stone, 


«< 


< < 


50 


Edw H Smith, 


4 « 


<« 


25 


Bob Smith, 


tt 


c t 


25 


F R Starkey, 
Geo Hills, 


li 

a 


« < 
<< 


25 

50 


W G Brown, 


it 


<< 


25 


N L Harris, 


>< 


ft 


25 


J H Hardy, 
A H Walton, 


< < 
it 


< < 


1 50 
75 


AF Burnham, 


<« 


< < 


50 


Frank Mallard, 


< < 


« < 


1 00 


Eugene Gilbert, 


< t 


< < 


25 


Arthur Leavitt, 


«< 


< t 


25 


Chester Scahill, 


< < 


a 


25 


Thos Gauld, 


<< 


n 


75 


Silas Stone, 


< t 


a 


25 


Jesse Jedrey, 
A Wait, 


< < 
<< 


t < 


25 
25 


Frank Wood, labo 


r, 


HORSES, 


3 33 


Paid to 
Highway Dept., 
F L Burke & Son, 


$200-00 
50 00 



18 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



EQUIPMENT AND REPAIRS. 

Paid to 
American-LaFrance Engine Co., supplies, 
J J Merrill, care fire alarm and repairs, 
Game well Fire Alarm Tel Co., storage battery 

and supplies, 
Mayer & f Porter, supplies, 
Western Union Tel Co., time service, 
D A Grady, supplies, 
N J Bolles, 

Russia Cement Co.. supplies, 
Canney Lumber Co., lumber, 
C S Tyler, supplies, 
J W Goodhue, supplies, 
Joseph A King, repairs, 
C F Chapman & Son, supplies, 
AC Damon, 

Peoples Express, Inc., express, 
The Morss & WhyteCo., supplies, 
Henry Bushek, inspection, 
C H Brooks, labor, 
American Express, express, 
E E Currier, supplies, 
Ipswich Mills, 

Badger Fire Extinguisher Co., extinguisher, 
Cornelius Callahan Co., supplies, 
Hiller &Co., supplies, 
A D Mallard, trucking and freight, 
J H & G L Atwood, primer, 
C C CaldweTs Garage, supplies, 



$ 29 92 


327 94 


913 90 


33 42 


15 00 


75 


3 95 


1 00 


43 53 


13 14 


17 88 


5 90 


13 76 


4 84 


1 35 


2 00 


9 00 


2 05 


28 


2 35 


3 74 


7 30 


1 82 


1 78 


5 60 


6 00 


1 25 



$1469 45 



HYDRANT SERVICE. 

Paid to ♦ 
Water Department, $300 00 



$300 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 19 



FUEL, LIGHT AND WATER. 
Paid to 
Geo W Pickering, fuel, $ 60 00 

Chas L Lovell, " 149 18 

Lathrop Bros., " 93 57 

A H Peatfield, " 154 99 

Geo Fall, " 51 00 

Ipswich Gas Light Co., gas, 15 40 

Electric Light Dept., light. 155 70 

Water Dept., water, 8 00 



$687 84 



MAINTENANCE OF BUILDING AND GROUNDS. 
Paid to 



A H Walton, painting, 


$10 25 


J J Merrill, wiring, 


23 72 


C H Brooks, plumbing, 


74 19 


Robert Spencer, labor, 


10 29 


A J Brennan, plumbing, 


3 25 


R L Purinton, supplies, 


27 50 


Geo B Robbins Co,, disinfectant, 


6 25 


Miley Soap Co, soap, 


17 50 


W L Stone, labor, 


1 00 


Dustbane Mfg Co,, dustbane, 


3 00 


H W Phillips, supplies, 


6 25 


PENSION. 




Paid to 




Agnes K Gilmore, 


$300 00 



$183 20 



$300 00 



OTHER EXPENSES. 
Paid to 
New England Tel & Tel Co., telephone, . $86 53 

H W Phillips, supplies, 30 00 

Geo B Brown, cement, 2 40 



20 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

Paid to 
N L Harris, auto hire, 
W G Brown, " " 
E E Currier, " " 
A C Damon, supplies, 
C F Chapman & Son. supplies, 
Braman Dow Co.. 
Dustbane Mfg Co., 
W B Richards, teaming, 
E H Smith, cash paid out, 
Chas L Lovell, cement, 
American Express Co., express, 
Somerville Brush Co., brushes. 
Measures Co., supplies, 
Peoples Express, Inc., express, 
John W Goodhue, supplies, 



Total expenditures, 
Unexpended balance, 



Appropriation, 

FOREST WARDEN DEPARTMENT. 

FIGHTING FIRES. 
Paid to 

Leander Goditt, labor, $ 25 

FW Stone, " 25 

Wm Lord, " 50 

EF Smith, Jr., " 50 

A H Walton, " 3 15 

Walter G Brown " 1 40 

Junius Avery, 50 

Arthur Leavitt, " 25 

Walter Stone, " 25 

E F Smith, " 25 



5 00 




2 00 




2 00 




23 70 




2 95 




13 50 




3 00 




2 00 




1 96 




65 




26 




6 25 




25 




1 65 




7 46 






$191 56 




• 


$6523 71 




66 29 




$6590 00 




$6590 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



21 



Paid to 
Wilfred Martel, labor, 
Arnold Richards, 
Chas Gwinn, 
Eli Lane, 
Thos Gauld, 
J H Hardy, 
James Hurtle, 
Edw H Smith, 
Brainard Wallace, 
Raymond Dodge, 
C J Dupray, 
Orrin Leno, 
George Hills, 
Silas Stone, 
J A Huckins, 
Ernest Carter, 
Chester Patch, 
Everett Smith, 
W Wait, 
Fred Mackinney, 
Robert Smith, 
Eugene Gilbert 
Frank Mallard, 
A F Burnham, 



Paid to 
Fiske & Harris, supplies, 
N L Harris, auto hire, 
W G Brown, " " 



Total expenditures. 
Unexpended balance, 



Appropriation, 



OTHER EXPENSES, 



$ 25 




75 




75 




25 




50 




25 




25 




1 00 




25 




25 




25 




25 




50 




25 




25 




50 




25 




25 




25 




50 




50 




25 




25 




25 




$ 


$16 30 


$5 76 


- 


3 00 




1 40 






$10 16 






$26 46 




73 54 




$100 00 




$100 00 



22 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



MOTH DEPARTMENT. 




SALARIES AND WAGES. 


Paid to 




James A Morey, Superintendent, $753 00 


John Floyd, 


labor, 434 59 


Bert Goodhue, 


239 35 


John McLaughlin, 


201 65 


John Cronin, 


158 03 


J Frank Goodhue, 


261 50 


Allan W Brown, 


62 15 


Harry Rutherford, 


59 03 


Wm Weagle, 


41 84 


Silas Stone, 


58 21 


J W A Hayes, 


25 31 


James Sheppard, 


3 75 


Alfred Gallant, 


5 06 


Wm Lord, 


75 61 


Ernest Lord, 


56 54 


Fred Morrill, 


47 52 


James Burns, 


120 93 


Adam Lauer, 


14 62 


Alvery Marriott, 


18 00 


Edw Ellsworth, 


9 00 


Wm Burns, 


73 11 


Augustus McGinnis, 


184 13 


Susie E Horton, clerical work, 10 00 

«9Q19 QQ 



OTHER EXPENSES. 

Paid to 
Wakefield Daily Item, printing, 
State Forester, tools, 
James A Morey, team, 

DA Grady, 
J W A Hayes, 
L J Wood, 



$ 2 25 


57 91 


349 00 


7 50 


32 00 


159 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT, 



23 



Paid to 
Geo A Schofield & Son, advertisement, 
A I Savory, supplies, 
American Express Co., express. 
Minnie Dort, rent, 

Chas W Bamford, administering oaths, 
Geo E Daniels, supplies, 
E E Currier, " - 

A D Mallard, teaming, 
Mayer & Porter, supplies, 



Total expenditures, 
Balance 1915 appropriation, 
Additional appropriation, 
Moth Tax (Private work) 
Appropriation, December, 1916, 



$ 8 40 


4 95 


4 00 


66 00 


6 25 


9 00 


21 75 


11 21 


22 20 


$2012 93 


38 05 


1320 23 


303 14 



$761 42 



$3674 35 



$3674 35 



1 


^REE WARDEN. 




Paid to 






James A Morey, 


labor, 


$102 00 


John Floyd, 


i < 


67 50 


J Frank Goodhue, 


i < 


38 25 


James Burns, 


<< 


13 50 


Wm Burns, 


(< 


9 00 


Alvery Marriett, 


< < 


19 40 


Edw Ellsworth, 


«< 


6 75 


A I Savory, supplies, 




4 30 


James A Morey, team, 




39 00 


D A Grady, 




11 50 


Carrie R Brown, repairs, 


3 00 


Joseph A King, " 




1 00 


Frank T Goodhue, supplies, 


3 25 


Geo E Safford, wagon, 




8 00 



24 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

Paid to 
Hayes Bros., supplies, 
John Durand, repairs, 
Minnie Dort, rent, 
Geo H Lord, filing saws, 
John W Goodhue, supplies, 
Wm A Spiller, repairs, 

Total expenditures, 
Unexpended balance, 



Appropriation, 



WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Paid to 
Wm A Stone, Sealer, 
J W Goodhue, supplies, 
W & L E Gurley, supplies, 
Chas G Hull, printing, 
Hobbs & Warren, record books, 
Ipswich Chronicle, advertisement, 
D A Grady, team, 
Priest, Page & Co., weights, 

Total expenditures, 
Unexpended balance, 



Appropriation, 



$1 20 




2 75 




6 00 




3 45 




6 45 




25 






$346 55 




53 45 




$400 00 




$400 00 



$150 00 




47 




18 26 




2 50 




4 70 




2 50 




17 00 




25 00 






$220 43 




4 57 




$225 00 




$225 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 25 



HEALTH AND SANITATION. 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATION, 

Paid to • 

George E MacArthur, M. D„ Salary, $100 00 

George W Smith, " 75 00 

Aaron Lord, " 75 00 

Ipswich Chronicle, printing advertising, 52 60 

New England Tel and Tel Co., telephone, 45 12 

Joseph Martel, garbage collection. 166 65 

Charles G Day, " " 172 06 

Town of Ipswich, rent of hall, 15 00 

Gordon Ewing, labor, 5 00 

American Express, express, 3 84 

Spencer Lens Co., rent, 2 50 

Hobbs & Warren, blanks, 4 11 

Amelia Clarke, typewriting, 1 00 

Arthur Quill, burying dog, 100 

Wm J Riley, settlement clerk, 50 00 

John W Goodhue, supplies, 23 75 

Edna MacAfee, welfare nurse, 344 58 

Tougas & Tougas, groceries, 5 01 

Mrs Wesley Scott, labor, 6 00 

P & C Laundry, laundry, 4 30 

J H Lakeman, distributing fliers, 3 00 

Harry Garrette, teaming, 2 00 

Albert F Welsh, legal services, 20 00 

Measures Co., supplies, 1 00 

D A Grady, auto hire, 4 00 



26 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

Paid to 
Titus & Co., furniture, 
A D Mallard, trucking, 
C S Tyler, supplies, 
Lathrop Bros., fuel and ice, 
Adeline M Waters, clean-up-week expense, 



$20 


25 


27 


00 


2 


60 


11 


60 


8 


75 



$1252 72 



QUARANTINE AND CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 
Paid to 
Geo E MacArthur, M. D., services, 
Frank L Collins, M. D„ 
City of Lynn, board and care, 
Marion P Manague, services, 
W N Prescott, supplies (1915) 
W F Poole, groceries, 
A I Armstrong, board. 
Elmer C Smith, guard duty, 
Valorous H Grant, guard duty, 
J A Andrews, provisions, 
Alexander LeClair, loss of wages, 
George Haskell, fumigation, 
George Fall, fuel, 
Ipswich Mills, rent, 

Dept of Health, N. Y., anti-rabic treatment, 
City of Salem, board and care, 

TUBERCULOSIS. 
Paid to 

State Board of Charity, board (1915) $ 47 00 

George E MacArthur, M. D., services, 36 25 

George Haskell, fumigation, 2 75 

Mrs Frank Parsons, nurse, 20 00 

Annie Reddy, nurse, 18 29 

Westfield State Sanatorium, board, 125 46 

Town Farm, board, 240 00 



$112 25 


5 00 


26 37 


10 58 


47 02 


4 00 


2 25 


1 00 


1 50 


99 


13 33 


11 00 


4 00 


37 74 


25 00 


137 14 



$439 17 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 27 



Paid to 
J H Gidney, cash paid out, 
H H Roper, milk, 

(1915) 
Tougas & Tougas. groceries, 
K A Kelly, car fare, 
First Dept Store Co., clothing, 
W N Prescott, medicine, 
George Fall, fuel, 
S H Thurston, shoes, 



INSPECTION. 
Paid to 
Geo W Smith, Milk Inspector 
Aaron Lord, Agent, 

E Newton Brown, Inspector of Animals, 
" " " " " Slaughtering, 

J W W Cummings, auto hire, 
George E MacArthur, auto hire, 



Total expenditures, 
Unexpended balance. 



Appropriation, 

Appropriation unpaid 1915 bills, 



$ 65 


• 54 54 


4 95 


72 00 


3 22 


7 75 


1 00 


6 00 


2 75 



— $642 61 



$200 00 




425 00 




175 00 




179 00 




12 00 




3 00 






$994 00 






$3328 50 




276 97 




$3605 47 


$3500 00 




105 47 







$3605 47 



28 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATION. 

Paid to 

J A Huckins, Superintendent, 

C C Caldwell, auto hire, 

Mayer & Porter, auto hire, 

E E Currier, auto hire, 

A M Clarke, typewriting, 

H B McArdle, supplies, 

American Express Co., express, 

Mass. Highway Commission, registration fee, 

Peoples Express, Inc., express, 

Geo E Hodgkins. liability insurance, 

J A Huckins, car fares, 

Measures Co., supplies, 

J H Lakeman, P. M,, envelopes, 



$1200 00 


8 50 


5 00 


3 25 


4 00 


6 30 


3 73 


10 00 


3 15 


74 00 


6 44 


15 


10 62 



STREET REPAIRS. 

LABOR AND TEAMS. 
Paid to 

Wilfred Atherley, $167 42 

James W Appleton, 109 80 

WmArsenault, 134 82 

F R Appleton, 33 56 

Edw Bodwell, . 24 31 

A Story Brown, 37 21 



$1335 14 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 29 



Paid to 

Charles G Brown, $36 26 

Walter G Brown, 6 75 

John A Brown, 51 87 

Jas W Burns, 22 21 

Ernest Carter, 498 67 

Henry Churchill, 4 35 

Wm Cameron, - 45 75 

Wm Conant, 433 06 

Carl Caverly, 148 90 

Thos Cummings, 12 09 

Albert Chapman, 418 29 

Joseph A Comer, 192 00 

Patrick Donlon, 11 10 

Barney Dunn, 8 98 

Walter Ellsworth, 11 10 

Wm HFessenden, 31 50 

Wm Goodhue, 9 38 

Walter F Gould, 5 62 

Spencer Gwinn, 16 88 

Frank H Girard, 5 00 

Frank E Howe, 3 51 

Chas Henley, 67 88 

Rees Jenkins, 68 25 

Daniel Kelly, 196 97 

Louis Kelly, 50 18 

Lathrop Bros., 30 32 

Thos R Lord, 26 26 

A G Lauer, 54 51 

Nathaniel Lowe, 11 25 

Isaac Lemieux, 83 51 

J R Morris, 3 40 

Geo Manzer, 1 40 

Eben Moulton, 39 00 

J A Morey, 6 00 

W H Norris, 17 71 

D S Perley, 95 48 



30 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

Paid to 
Lyman Perley, 
Chester Patch, 
Chas Parsons, 
John E Poyner, 
Nick Pappayanopoulos, 
Joseph Phaneuf 
Thos R Roberts, 
Frank Scahill, 
Albert Sheppard, 
Frank Sanborn, 
James Sheppard, 
Joseph Stinson, 
Thomas Smith, 
Turner Hill Farm, 
Frank Wood, 
Lester Wood, 
Ed Wile, 
Sam White, 
Harry Wilkinson, 
Win Welsh, 
Wilfred Wile, 
Harry H Roper, 
Seth Senior, 



SAND, GRAVEL, OIL, ETC. 

Paid to 

Angie P Brown, $430 15 

Waltei G Brown, 4 00 

Boston & Maine R. R., 28 88 

The Barrett Co.. 8 00 

Thos J Broderick, 17 15 

A J Barton & Son, 36 75 

Canney Lumber Co., 93 45 

Essex Trap Rock & Construction Co., 61 51 

Mrs A B Fellows, 18 90 



$ 6-75 


4 88 


12 65 


2 25 


67 88 


492 00 


69 00 


525 56 


621 00 


199 69 


67 88 


69 04 


63 12 


179 99 


180 00 


90 00 


23 13 


23 90 


466 37 


596 67 


57 00 


6 00 


3 93 



$7061 20 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 31 



Paid to 




Est Geo Harris, 


$ 5 55 


Headley Good Roads Co., 


15 55 


Independent Coal Tar Co., 


180 00 


A G Lauer, 


1 40 


Louis Nikolakakis, 


31 00 


Michael Ryan, 


36 75 


Est Eugene Sullivan, 


79 20 


James Sheppard, 


15 75 


Standard Oil Co., 


765 42 


Chas L Lovell, 


1 95 

qnqoi oa 




ipluOl oO 


EQUIPMENT AND REPAIRS. 


Paid to 




Joseph A King, repairs, 


$ 83 04 


C F Chapman & Son, supplies, 


15 55 


Hayes Bros,, 


93 


" (1915) 


75 


W A Spiller, repairs, 


22 25 


Mayer & Porter, supplies and repairs, 


89 72 


John W Goodhue, supplies, 


145 75 


E E Currier, truck and supplies, 


458 67 


John Durand, repairs, 


12 75 


New England Road Machinery Co., tools, 


79 60 


The Traffic Sign Co., signs, 


32 95 


N J Bolles, supplies, 


12 


Henry Bushek, inspection, 


5 00 


Canney Lumber Co., lumber, 


45 54 


C H Brooks, repairs, 


100 25 


Manzer & Damon, carpentry, 


55 29 


W F Poole, supplies, 


3 30 


Chas G Hull, painting signs, 


2 50 


John A Singer, labor, 


137 10 


J J Merrill, 


8 05 


A I Savory, supplies, 


15 58 


Clarence Cheever, repairs, 


1 00 



32 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Paid to 
A J Barton & Son, labor, 
C C Caldwell's Garage, supplies, 
L E Willcomb, supplies, (1915) 
Water Dept., fountains, 
Harold Bond Co., supplies, 
A H Walton, painting, 
Boston & Maine R. R., freight, 
John E Dodge, painting, 
E M Poole, labor, 
Chas L Lovell, supplies, 
Lathrop Bros., fuel, 
A D Mallard, trucking, 
A J Brennan, labor, 
Ipswich Mills, repairs, 
A C Damon, supplies, 



$ 6 10 


18 53 


1 82 


80 00 


14 89 


3 75 


5 51 


1 50 


4 00 


14 54 


14 35 


1 58 


40 


1 50 


1 80 



$1486 57 



BUOYS. 
Paid to 
George Brockelbank, care of buoys 
John Durand, repairs, 
Canney Lumber Co,, lumber, 
James Averoff, lanterns, 



$137 00 


2 50 


6 39 


21 12 



$167 01 



FLOATS. 



Paid to 
Justin E Hull, labor, 
John W Goodhue, supplies, 
Canney Lumber Co., lumber, 



$60 00 

12 61 

5 29 



$77 90 



SNOW AND ICE. 



Paid to 
Wilfred Atherley, 
James W Appleton, 



$ 97 11 
52 23 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 33 



Paid to 
Wesley B Atkinson, 
Wm Arsenault, 
Arthur W Atkinson, 
W Malcolm Atkinson, 
Wm Burnham, 
Dennis Bryant, 
Walter Brown, 
Fred Bod well, 
Henry H Brown, 
Edw Bodwell, 
E Newton Brown, 
A Story Brown, 
Chas G Brown, 
Jesse Brown, 
John H Brown, 
Allan W Brown, 
J Blunda, 
Wm Black, 
Henry S Bo wen. 
Geo H Brockelbank, 
Chester Brockelbank, 
Irving Brown, 
Jesse Bodwell, 
Walter G Brown, 
John A Brown, 
Geo Burbidge, 
Thos Burns, 
Samuel Bayley, 
Grover Bayley, 
Wm Burns, 
James Brdrlle, 
Jas W Burns, 
Edw L Blaisdell, 
Francis N Bourque, 
Ernest Carter, 
J C Conant, 



$36 68 


10 82 


5 62 


1 96 


43 27 


23 18 


1 12 


6 75 


48 77 


17 98 


12 50 


119 45 


28 25 


52 15 


60 77 


27 97 


2 25 


25 79 


1 68 


13 41 


7 86 


14 25 


24 03 


36 50 


27 50 


17 85 


5 20 


3 65 


7 87 


35 84 


4 50 


11 81 


5 90 


3 36 


132 28 


3 08 



34 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Paid to 

R T Crane, Jr,, $ 254 63 

Henry Churchill, 47 08 

O CO 

Dennis Cashman, * °° 

Herbert Choate, 26 15 

Thos Cunningham, L uo 

JF Claxton, Jr., 24 24 

FredG Cross, 32 61 

John Cronin, 8 00 

W K Chapman, 7 59 

Jean Chouinard, 14 ° y 

Wm Cameron, 15 55 

Chester Cameron, 4 °^ 

Wm Conant, 17 55 

Armo Chapman, * °^ 

Fred Carter, 19 n 

Carl Caverly, 40 93 

Patrick Donlon, 19 58 

Walter Dodge, 25 29 

Nicholas Deminare, ° 

Charles Dort, ^ ^ 2 

Forest A Dow, 

Raymond Dodge, 

Lester Davison, 

Fred Davison, 

Fred Denningham, 21 01 

2 24 

Barney Dunn, * 

J W Davison, £ 4 ° 

Charles Dolan, ° *J 

Geo Day, ^ 

John Drapeau, 

Walter Ellsworth, * 9 ^ 

Kingsley Ellsworth, ™ ™ 

Albert Elwell, 5 ° ll 

Arnold Fessenden, £ ^ 

Elwin Fessenden, . 7 r 

Wm H Fessenden, z 5U 



7 45 

47 22 

4 50 

84 



IPSWICH TOWN EEPORT. 35 



Paid to 
Alex Fraser, 
E P Ferguson, 
Wm Goodhue, 
Philip Gallant, . 
J Frank Goodhue, 
Henry Gaudet, 
Abner Gray, 
Leroy Goodhue, 
Bert Goodhue 
Walter F Gould, 
Alfred Gallant, 
David Gannon, 
James Gallant, 
Octave Gallant, 
Joseph Gallant, 
M Hills, 
Stanley Hills, 
Frank E Howe, 
Edgar I Holland, 
N R Harris, 
Asa Howe, 
Philip Hinckley, 
David Hinckley, 
Roland Hills, 
Albert S Hills, 
Benj R Horton, 
James Hirtle, 
Charles Henley, 
Lloyd Irvine, 
Leander Jewett, 
Edgar Jacklin, 
Rees Jenkins, 
Charles Jewett, 
Ernest Jewett, 
Maynard Jewett, 
Jos Jeannette, 



$5 48 


7 87 


2 25 


4 78 


14 04 


12 23 


2 10 


23 73 


19 46 


7 44 


2 10 


2 38 


2 95 


2 95 


1 26 


20 56 


12 82 


19 65 


1 40 


1 12 


2 53 


36 05 


10 26 


1 96 


4 63 


27 69 


3 36 


7 86 


13 07 


33 15 


3 37 


64 14 


99 38 


28 38 


8 43 


13 07 



36 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

Paid to 

Daniel Kelly, $35 28 

W Quincy Kinsman, 58 19 

Chas E Kent, 8 28 

Wm Kirby, 3 65 

Lathrop Bros., 124 31 

Thos R Lord, 85 47 

A G Lauer, 28 79 
David Lowe, • 15 32 

Alex LeClair, 5 20 

Wm Lord, 5 89 

Edw Martel, 1 12 

John R Morris, 34 69 

John Morehouse, 3 37 

Geo Manzer, 13 07 

Daniel J Marlin, 1 68 

Frank Mallard, 9 83 

Eben Moulton, 17 37 

Clifford Miller, 3 79 

Albert Miller, 6 33 

Donald Morgan, 1 12 

Alvin Marriott, 3 37 

Leslie Maden, 19 88 

Fred McGilvary, 24 45 

John McLaughlin; 16 93 

Fred Mackinney, 4 49 

Myron Nason, 12 51 

Chas E Nason, 2 25 

J E Norman, Jr., 8 15 

Harry W Bamford, 28 52 

Geo Bailey, 1 40 

Fred Orr, 2 81 

D S Perley, 88 05 

Lyman Perley, 10 10 

Chester Patch, 4 88 

Chas Parsons. 21 99 

John E Poyner, 9 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 37 



Paid to 
Chas Pickard, 
Harold Poor 
Chas Poor, 
Walter Prentiss, 
Theodore Perry, 
Wm Purcell, 
Philip Perry, 
Joseph Phaneuf, 
Arthur Quill, 
Edw Robishaw, 
V E Rust, Jr., 
Chas Ring, 
Harold Roper, 
John Riley, 
Howard Roper, 
Thos Roberts, 
Jos Robishaw, 
Harry Rutherford* 
Foster Russell, 
W F Rutherford, 
Frank Scahill, 
Albert Sheppard, 
Edw Spiller, 
Clarence Smith, 
Frank Sanborn, 
Wm Stone, Jr., 
Lawrence Scotton, 
Elmer C Smith, 
Richard Smith, 
Geo Stanley, 
R H Smith, Jr., 
Chester Stone, 
Wm Stone, 
Prince Smith, 
Harding Smith 
Silas Stone, 



$ 4 90 


33 09 


31 26 


10 68 


9 84 


4 78 


26 15 


42 60 


9 00 


17 20 


12 57 


4 21 


16 01 


3 65 


8 84 


53 84 


11 81 


22 21 


3 08 


3 37 


153 50 


.201 00 


44 67 


2 03 


51 87 


35 69 


2 17 


3 09 


6 03 


13 35 


2 81 


•5 89 


12 08 


56 64 


2 25 


34 00 



38 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

Paid to 
Lewis Stone, 
Wm Scott, 
Robt Spencer, 
James Sheppard, 
Henry Sturgis, 
Wm Shaw, 
Fred Sheppard, 
Horace Smith, 
Frank Stone, 
Grant Southwick, 
Chas Senior, 
Jos Stinson, 
Wm T Tarr, 
Geo Tibbitts, 
F Thompson. 
Turner Hill Farm, 
Elliott Tozer, 
Frank Wood, 
Lester Wood, 
Brainard C Wallace, 
Dana Wells, 
H Whittier, 
Prince Wood, 
Richard Wei ton, 
Roger Winch, 
Carl Woodbury, 
G Loring Woodbury, 
Wm Weagle, 
Clifford Weagle, 
Chas Weagle, 
Leonard Williams, 
Ed Wile, 
Edmund Kelley, 
Jos Leet, 
Harold Langdon, 
Arthur Montgomery, 



$15 73 


84 


25 87 


2 39 


5 06 


10 26 


13 21 


11 50 


9 27 


1 68 


4 78 


5 62 


3 79 


30 08 


26 00 


26 10 


1 12 


165 00 


165 00 


6 75 


1 82 


2 81 


5 06 


7 03 


3 37 


29 66 


25 30 


24 24 


84 


9 90 


11 39 


10 00 


6 75 


16 71 


14 33 


7 87 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 39 



Paid to 
Irving- Manzer, 
Wm A Mitchell, 
Earl Bamford, 
Leonard Brown, 
Geo Brown, Jr., 
Nelson Bourque, 
Thos Cummings, 
Albert Chapman, 
John Douglas, 
Lester Gilmore, 
Est Geo Harris, 
Jas Hull, Jr., 
Nathaniel Lowe, 
Robt Lakeman, 
Otis Lambert, 
Thos L Mores 
Winfred Martel, 
H W Norris, 
Nick Pappayanopoulos, 
J T Putnam, 
Frank Perkins, 
Isaac Spencer, 
H M Smith, 
W E Sturgis, 
Newman Saunders, 
Daniel Wells, 
Harry Wilkinson, 
Thomas Wilkinson, 
Thomas Whitehead, 
Ambrose Young, 



$13 50 


6 75 


2 53 


6 18 


2 53 


3 93 


84 


8 71 


6 46 


2 53 


1 50 


4 78 


9 18 


3 16 


1 68 


1 40 


84 


84 


3 93 


1 68 


12 23 


3 79 


56 


6 46 


2 25 


9 56 


19 96 


11 81 


3 79 


3 93 


$4932 07 



40 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



STABLE. 



Paid to 
Ame & Co,, grain, 
Wm G Horton, grain, 
Geo B Brown, grain, 
John A Brown, hay, 
SIHudgens, 
Walter G Brown, " 
Walter F Gould, " 
A Story Brown, 
CACaverly, 
Wm McCarthy, shoeing, 



(1915) 



N J Bolles, supplies, 

(1915) 

Water Dept., water, 

(1915) 

Standard Oil Co., oil, 

Russia Cement Co., supplies, 

H D Lambert, services, 

C F Chapman & Son' supplies, 

Canney Lumber Co., lumber, 

J J Merrill, wiring, 

John W Goodhue, supplies, 

B J Conley, 

C H Brooks, plumbing, 

W A Snow Iron Works, fixtures, 

C S Tyler, supplies, 

J R Richards, supplies, 

Wm P Reilly, 



Total expenditures, 
Unexpended balance, 



$ 9 25 


457 39 


394 48 


267 53 


64 96 


51 22 


42 56 


41 69 


38 81 


142 75 


12 00 


36 


80 


39 95 


8 93 


2 25 


3 00 


50 25 


40 45 


24 51 


47 88 


1 24 


3 65 


4 65 


32 10 


20 


1 70 


2 54 

$1797 10 


«pl l O l L\J 


$18678 35 


391 79 



$19070 14 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 41 



Appropriation, 

Appropriation unpaid 1915 bills, 

Appropriation County Street wall, 

Transfer from Reserve Fund, 

Refund — Highway Commission, 

Refund— Bay State St Ry Co., snow account, 

Street Railway Tax, 

Excise Tax, 



114900 


00 


24 28 


200 


00 


1000 


00 


162 


36 


138 


58 


1040 40 


1604 52 



$19070 14 



42 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



CHARITIES. 

OUT POOR DEPARTMENT. 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATION. 

Paid to ' 
Frank T Goodhue, Salary, 
Chas G Hull, 
Walter F Gould, 
Chas G Hull, agent, 
Hobbs & Warren, blanks, 
Ipswich Chronicle, printing 1 , 
Chas G Hull, printing, 
Boston & Maine R R,, mileage book, 
American Express Co . , express, 
E E Currier, auto hire, 
WmJ Riley, settlement clerk, 
Frank T Goodhue, cash paid out, 
F S Witham, car fare, 
The General Fireproofing Co., supplies, 
J W W Cummings, auto hire, 
New England Tel & Tel Co., telephone, 

" " l \ " " (1915) 

Edw G Hull, auto hire, 

CASH ALLOWANCES. 
Paid to 
Various persons, cash, $1580 00 



$100 00 


75 00 


75 00 


199 94 


7 78 


2 25 


5 50 


22 50 


5 84 


5 50 


150 00 


1 00 


75 


5 63 


2 00 


88 71 


9 91 


50 



$758 81 



$1580 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



43 



RENT. 



Paid to 
W G Brown, 
Heirs F Damon, 
Daniel O'Brien, 
M E Lawrence, 
Elizabeth Harrigan, 
Fred Morrill, 
N Burnham, 



Paid to 
Tougas & Tougas, 
F R Starkey, 
L E Willcomb, 
L R Lord, 
W F Poole, 
W P Reilly, 
E E Gray Co., 
G A Gauld, 
M M Wiezbicki, 



GROCERIES. 



$ 19 50 


99 00 


104 50 


13 00 


50 00 


10 00 


90 00 


$111 00 


10 00 


17 00 


52 19 


159 84 


214 29 


50 95 


3 00 


4 15 



$386 00 



$622 42 



FUEL. 



Paid to 
Chas L Lovell, 
A H Peatfield, 
Lathrop Bros., 



Paid to 
Elizabeth H Smith, 
M E Kneeland, 
Elizabeth Ralph, 
Mary King, 



BOARD AND CARE. 



$ 23 35 

108 70 

8 00 


$63 00 

70 50 

8 00 

24 00 



$140 05 



$165 50 



44 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



MEDICINE AND MEDICAL ATTENDANCE. 



Paid to 






A E Bailey, 




$ 12 50 


B J Conley, 




55 30 


J A Blake, 




34 50 


Geo G Bailey, M. D., 




25 50 


S APedrick, M. D., 




13 75 


Emile Poirier, M. D., 




9 95 


C H Davis, M. D., 




15 00 


George E MacArthur, M 


. D. 


15 00 


M C McGinley, M. D., 


INSTITUTIONS. 


266 80 






Paid to 






Salem Hospital, 




$89 00 


Mass. General Hospital, 


■* 


35 31 


OTHER CITIES AND TOWNS. 


Paid to 






City of Revere, 




$ 56 53 


City of Lynn, 




428 56 


City of Beverly, 




164 44 


City of Newbury port. 




92 00 



City of Boston, 200 07 

City of Gloucester, 77 99 

City of Brockton, (1915) 120 31 

City of Salem, 11 76 

Town or Rowley. (1915) 47 00 

" ". " 70 31 

Town of Peabody, 59 10 

" " " (1915) 51 70 

Town of Danvers, " 112 00 

" " " 104 00 



$448 30 



$124 31 



$1595 77 



' IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 45 

MOTHERS' AID. 

Paid to 

City of Revere, $ 176 49 

" " " (1915) 104 00 

Town of Rowley, " 121 34 

" " " 121 34 

Town of Ashland, (1915) 108 47 

Various Persons, Ipswich cases, 2655 00 

$3286 64 



OTHER EXPENSES. 
Paid to 
S D Dodge, auto hire, 
First Dept Store, clothing, 
S H Thurston, arch supporters, 
C C Caldwell's Garage, auto hire, 



Total expenditures, 
Unexpended balance, 



Appropriation, 

Appropriation unpaid 1915 bills, 



$ 6 00 




2 35 




1 00 




10 00 






$19 35 






$9127 15 




2 02 




$9129 17 


$8200 00 




929 17 







$9129 17 



46 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

During the year the following 1916 accounts have been settled: 
City of Beverly, $ 6 00 

City of Salem, , 191 33 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, State cases, 277 00 

" Mothers' Aid cases, 675 51 

$1149 84 



Accounts due and unpaid: 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, State cases, $ 93 00 

" Mothers' Aid cases, 104 00 



$197 00 



$1346 84 



Expended 1916, $9127 15 

Income. 1346 84 



Net expense, $7780 31 



The following old accounts have been received during the 
year: 

Town of Peabody, 1914 yk, $177 92 

Town of Newbury, 1915 <#, 16 50 

City of Salem, 1915 <y c , 55 04 

Commonwealth of Mass., Temporary Aid, 1915 <#, 184 00 

" Mothers' Aid, 1915 #, 175 00 

$608 4S 



$600 00 


315 00 


212 26 


169 00 


2 25 


5 50 


10 00 


1 43 


3 50 


14 50 


3 75 


20 00 



$1357 19 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 47 

TOWN FARM. 

SALARIES AND WAGES. 
Paid to 
J H Gidney, Superintendent, 
Elwood M Gidney, labor, 
Delta M Powell, 
M E Gidney, 
Silas Stone, 
N E Lowe, 
Ed Wile, 
Rebecca Leeman, 
Walter E Dodge, 
Stanley A Hull, 
Hugh Gwinn, 
L O Tibert, 

GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 
Paid to 

Tougas & Tougas, $306 69 

W R King, 15 54 

Grand Union Tea Co,, 36 10 

A C Smith, 3 21 

N J Bolles, 46 84 

L E Willcomb, 21 94 

Titcomb & Co., 9 06 

J A Farley & Co., 42 75 

F R Starkey, 7 72 

W P Reilly, 80 17 

O B Kippin, 21 96 

G A Gauld, 34 02 

CO Amazeen&Co., 5 04 

W S Atkinson, 4 11 

Ipswich Tallow Co., 3 75 

Ipswich Fish Market, 1 38 

Cressey & Dockham, 9 50 

James Averoff, 14 10 

$663 88 



48 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



DRY GOODS AND CLOTHING 


i 


Paid to 




First Dept Store, 


$45 49 

9AC. ACk 




«P*±0 4:t7 


FUEL AND LIGHT, 




Paid to 




Standard Oil Co., 


$18 45 


A H Peatfield, 


95 93 

<M1j4 °9 




«p±±ft oo 


EQUIPMENT AND REPAIRS. 




Paid to 




Thos P Thomas, labor, 


$ 9 56 


C F Chapman & Son, supplies, 


39 62 


R L Purinton, plumbing, 


46 63 


J W Goodhue, supplies, 


99 13 


Mayer & Porter, supplies, 


29 14 


C L Lovell, cement, 


4 05 


J A King, repairs, 


36 48 


Hayes Bros., plumbing, 


2 93 


(1915) 


2 40 


A C Damon, supplies. 


9 63 


F T Goodhue, paint, 


5 45 


H A Pickard, labor, 


6 50 


J A Singer, labor, 


122 10 


John McLaughlin, labor, 


42 50 


Jere Atkinson, labor, 


68 00 


CanneyLumbei Co., lumber, 


226 76 


Porter B Peabody, moving building, 


150 00 


Wra Goodhue, sand. 


3 60 

$004 4Q 




«pyu<t 4to 


GRAIN. 




Paid to 




Wm G Horton, grain, 


$264 45 


(1915) 


14 95 


Geo B Brown, grain, 


183 72 

<JM£Q 10 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



49 



OTHER EXPENSES. 
Paid to 
J A Bouchard, shoeing, 

(1915) 
J A Blake, supplies, (1915) 
W J Norwood, sawdust, 
B J Conley, medicine, 
Dr J R Bartlett, services, 
Geo G Bailey, M. D., services, 
George Haskell, burial, 
D A Grady, auto hire, 
Walter F Gould, use of team, 
J H Gidney, cash paid out, 
WF Cobb Co., trees, 
H W Phillips, supplies, 
Miley Soap Co., supplies, 
J W W Cummings, auto hire, 
Geo Gwinn, use corn planter, 
C F Chapman & Son, supplies, 
E E Currier, auto hire, 
Edw G Hull, auto hire, 
Mayer & Porter, supplies, 
Wm McCarthy, shoeing, 
Ernest Lemay, " 



$40 30 


10 30 


1 00 


3 60 


31 45 


11 00 


16 00 


38 00 


1 00 


7 00 


4 8tf 


26 50 


13 00 


17 50 


2 0C 


1 00 


11 55 


8 00 


2 00 


8 54 


6 00 


14 30 



$274 93 



Total expenditures, 
Unexpended balance, 



$3823 47 
49 58 



Appropriation, 

Appropriation unpaid 1915 bills, 
Transfer from Reserve Fund, 
Refund — Board of Health, 



$3873 05 



$3400 00 


33 05 


200 00 


240 00 



$3873 05 



50 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



INVENTORY— STOCK, TOOLS, ETC. AT TOWN FARM, 

Jan. 1, 1917. Jan, 1, 1916. 





NO, 

7 


VALUE 

$700 00 


NO. 

8" 


VALUE 


GAIN 

165 00 


LOSS 


Cows, 


$535 00 




Steers. 






3 


15 00 




$15 00 


Bull, 


1 


35 00 






35 00 




Heifers, 


6 


250 00 


3 


45 00 


205 00 




Horses, 


2 


600 00 


3 


600 00 






Pigs and Shoats, 


6 


75 00 






75 00 




Fowl, 


30 


30 00 


55 


55 00 




25 00 


Carts and Wagons, 


8 


475 00 


8 


500 00 




25 00 


Mowing Machine, 


1 


45 00 


1 


45 00 






Plows, 


3 


25 00 


3 


15 00 


10 00 




Cultivators, 


3 


30 00 


3 


30 00 






Horse Hoe, 


1 


5 00 


1 


5 00 






Horse Hay Fork, 


1 


50 00 


1 


50 00 






Harrows, 


4 


50 00 


4 


50 00 






Sled, 


1 


15 00 


1 


15 00 






Drags, 


2 


6 50 


2 


6 50 






Wood, cords, 


12 


108 00 


17 


119 00 




11 00 


Coal, tons, 






1- 


2 4 00 




4 00 


Groceries and Provisions, 




125 00 




75 00 


50 00 




Dairy Utensils, 




15 00 




5 00 


10 00 




Furniture and Bedding, 




500 00 




500 00 






Range and Fixtures, 




110 00 




110 00 






Stoves and Furnace, 




150 00 




150 00 






Tedder, 


1 


15 00 


1 


15 00 






Tools, 




10 00 




10 00 






Blocks and Ropes, 




5 00 




5 00 






Ice Chest, 


1 


36 00 


1 


36 00 






Harnesses and Blankets, 




75 00 




75 00 






Potato Digger, 


1 


1 00 


1 


1 00 






Wheelbarrows, 


1 


4 50 


2 


3 50 


1 00 




Lumber, 




30 00 




50 00 




20 00 


Double Bob, 


1 


20 00 


1 


20 00 






Brooder, 


1 


5 00 


1 


5 00 






Seed Sower, 


2 


10 00 


2 


10 00 






Gas Engine, 






1 


25 00 




25 00 


Wood Saw, 


1 


50 00 


1 


50 00 






Hogs, 






3 


50 00 




50 00 


Suckers, 






10 


25 00 




25 00 


Hay Rake, 


1 


21 00 


1 


21 00 






Pump Jack, 


1 


14 00 






14 00 




Total, 


$3696 00 


$3331 00 


565 00 


$200 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



51 



INVENTORY— PRODUCE, ETC, AT TOWN FARM. 
Jan. 1, 1917. Jan. 1, 1916. 





NO. VALUE 


NO. 


VALUE GAIN 


| LOSS 


Beans, bushels, 


2 $ 13 00 


2 


8 00 $ 5 00 




Potatoes, bushels, 


40 70 00 


15 


15 00 55 00 




Roots, bushels, 


15 30 00 


35 


17 50 ! 12 50 




English Hay, tons, 


40 800 00 


20 


440 00 360 00 




Salt Hay, tons, 


30 240 00 


4 


36 00 204 00 




Mulch, tons, 


1 6 00 


5 


35 00 


29 00 


Squash, tons. 




1-10 2 00 i 


2 00 


Corn, bushels, 




5 


2 50 


2 50 


Hams, 




2 


6 00 




6 00 


Vinegar, bbls, 


3 15 00 


4 


20 00 




5 00 


Salt Poik, lbs, 


200 35 GO 

$1209 00 


75 


10 00 25 00 




Total, 




$ 592 00 661 50 


$44 50 


Inventory, stock, tools,etc 


3696 00 
$4905 00 




3331 00 


565 00 
1226 50 


200 GO 






$3923 00 


$244 50 




3923 00 






244 50 

$982 00 




Net Gain, 


$982 CO 









SUMMARY OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES AT THE TOWN 
FARM FOR THE YEARS 1912, 1913, 1914, 1915, 1916. 



1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 


Expended, 


II $3941 75||$4220 31||$3083 81||$3640 06||$3823 47 


Income, 


II 1756 52|| 2004 2511 867 21|| 1137 59j| 872 05 


Net Expense, 


ll$2185 23i|$2216 06||i2216 60||$2502 47||$2951 42 



Average number of inmates at Farm during the year, 9. 

Average cost per week for each inmate, $ 6 30 

Sale of milk, hay and produce, 814 10 

Due from sales, 57 95 

Total income for the year 1916, 872 05 



Amount collected on old accounts, 



$220 60 



52 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. " 

SOLDIERS' BENEFITS. 

SOLDIERS' RELIEF. 

Paid to 

Various Parties, cash allowance, $830 00 

L E Willcomb, groceries, 108 00 

Duval & Son, " 84 01 

Tougas & Tougas, " 36 00 . 

Mrs M Marcaurelle, groceries, 60 10 
George E MacArthur, M. D., medical attendance, 160 50 

Salem Hospital, board and care, 41 00 

Geo G Bailey, M. D., medical attendance, 36 00 

Appleton Farms, fuel, 7 00 

John A Brown, " 6 00 

" " " rent, 84 00 

A I Armstrong, room, 1 00 

David Greenburg, teaming, 4 00 

David A French, car fare and expense, 4 00 

A H Peatfield, fuel, 4 00 

Lathrop Bros., fuel. 4 00 

Total expenditures, $1469 61 

Unexpended balance, 30 39 



$1500 00 
Appropriation, $1500 00 



STATE AID. 
Paid to 
Sundry Persons, cash, $2250 20 

Total expenditures, $2250 20 

Unexpended balance, 249 80 



$2500 00 
Appropriation, $2500 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT, 



53 



MEMORIAL DAY. 
Paid to 
Gen James Appleton Post, GAR 

Appropriation, 



$250 00 



$250 00 
$250 00 



PARKS- 






Paid to 






John McLaughlin, labor, 


$ 14 63 




John Floyd, 


2 25 




Chas H Wells, 


109 12 




Howard Blake, 


2 25 




Geo Burbidge, 


2 25 




Patrick Donlon, *' 


2 00 




J Frank Goodhue, 


48 91 




R W Ward, plants, 


51 70 




Joseph Breck & Son, plants, 


27 30 




May Scott, fertilizer, 


3 00 




Water Dept., water, 


16 00 




W P Reilly, seed, 


5 75 




W A Spiller, wheelbarrow, 


5 00 




John W Goodhue, supplies, 


3 19 




American Express Co., express, 


61 




Total expenditures, 




$293 96 




Unexpended balance, 




6 04 


» 


$300 00 


Appropriation, 




$300 00 



$ 1 00 




5 50 




15 20 




2 82 




2 00 






$26 52 






73 48 




$100 00 




$100 00 



54 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



PLAY GROUNDS. 



Paid to 
Ed Wile, labor. 
Water Dept., water, 
Hayes Bros., plumbing, 
John W Goodhue, supplies, 
A D Mallard, trucking, 
Total expenditures, 
Unexpended balance, 



Appropriation, 



BUILDING COMMITTEE. 

Paid to 

Ipswich Chronicle, printing report, $ 32 00 

Transferred to School Dept., 222 43 

Total expenditures, $254 43 

Balance 1915 appropriation, $254 43 



WINTHROP SCHOOL ADDITION. 

Paid to 

B W Neal, Inc., contract, $7925 75 

Andrews, Jaques & Rantoul, architects, 200 80 

The Waterproofing Co,, waterproofing, 484 00 

Transferred to School Dept., 250 30 

Total expenditures, $8860 85 

Balance 1915 aprropriation, $8850 85 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 55 



CEMETERIES. 

Paid to 
Howard Blake, - labor, $319 80 

Edward Bod well, " 6 34 

Wm M Davey, " 36 00 

Chas Jewett, <c 8 48 

Jesse W Bodwell, " 57 24 

Forest A Dow, " 84 57 

W F Rutherford, " 72 55 

Chester G Brockelbank, " 13 50 

James H Hull, " 16 03 

JohnB Drapeau, " 12 38 

Walter P Ross, " 36 01 

Howard J Blake, " 83 80 

Geo H Brockelbank, " 11 25 

Wm B Richards, " 20 25 

Clarence Grant, 4 50 

John E Norman, " 14 63 

Wm Denningham, 2 25 

Fred Denningham, 4 50 

Frank Mclnnis, " 30 09 

George Burbidge, 42 75 

WD French, *' 65 09 

Luther A Lord, " 223 37 

Philip Hinckley, " 9 00 

O M Hills, " 36 89 

Joseph W Ross, " 4 00 

F R Lapham, " 4 50 

Wm L Stone, " 2 25 

Philip E Clarke, " 80 16 

E J M Scahill, u 30 00 

Austin L Lord, " 58 87 



56 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Paid to 






E W Pearson, plants, 


$48 24 




E J M Scahill, tools, 


52 20 




Chas L Lovell, cement, 


15 30 




W P Reilly, supplies, 


1 25 




C H Brooks, plumbing, 


6 40 




R L Purinton, 


71 




Hayes Bros., 


6 13 




A J Brennan, 


9 00 




Canney Lumber Co., lumber, 


6 48 




Mechanical Service Station, labor, 


13 25 




Reade Mfg Co., supplies, 


7 50 




Manzer & Damon, carpentry, 


81 11 




John W Goodhue, supplies, 


7 10 




M D Jones Co., 


8 68 




Peoples Express, Inc., express, 


35 




A I Savory, supplies, 


20 25 




CS Tyler, 


1 25 




A J Barton & Son, labor, 


10 50 




Albert F Welsh, legal services, 


5 00 


$1691 75 






PERPETUAL CARE. 






Paid to 






L A Lord, labor. 


$118 00 




Howard Blake. 


1«1 50 




John H.Baker, 


31 00 




F B Saunders, 


3 50 




M Hills, 


4 20 




Carrie R Brown, flowers, 


3 00 


$261 20 






Total expenditures, 


$1952 95 


Unexpended balance, 


$1700 CO 
261 20 


8 25 


Appropriation, 

Cemetery Trust Funds— Perpetual Care, 


$1961 20 
S1961 20 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



57 



SHELL FISH. 

Paid to 
•James Carter, services as Commissioner, 
•E Warren Dodge, 

Annie Atherley, addressing reports, 
J H Lakeman, P. M,, stamps, 
Ipswich Chronicle, printing reports, 
Geo A Schofield, expense Clam Committee trip 

to Plymouth, 
Chas G Hull, printing, 
Canney Lumber Co,, lumber, 
Wm H Jewett, guard duty, 
Elmer C Smith ' " 
Total expenditures, 
Unexpended balance. 



$211 43 




200 00 




1 5i 




1'.- (-0 




41 15 




22 32 




6 00 




2 42 




1 00 




1 10 






$496 82 






3 18 



$500 00 



Appropriation, 



$5Gu 04i 



TOWN SCALES. 



Paid to 

The Fairbanks Co., scales, 
Manzer & Damon, building pit, 
Thomas Smith, labor, 
Louis Kelley, 
Wm Arsenault, " 
Boston & Maine R R,, freight, 
Canney Lumber Co., lumber, 
Total expenditures, 
Unexpended balance, 



Appropriation, 



$49 J 00 




2ol 25 




9 00 




9 28 




2 53 




9 31 




69 22 






$790 59 




9 41 




|800 Ou 




$300 00 



58 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

WATER FRONT IMPROVEMENT. 

Paid to 
James Averoff and Soteros Canelos, 

wharf property, $3250 00 

$3250 00 

Appropriotion, $3250 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



59 



RESERVE FUND. 




Transferred to Highway Dept., $1000 00 




" Election and Registration, 150 00 




" Law Dept., 125 00 




" Selectmen's Dept., 75 00 




" Police Dept., 185 00 




" Town Farm Dept., 200 00 




" Interest Account, . 324 09 




1 n*f"*"ll ITYinnnt f rinnTnwr^ri 


$2059 09 
940 91 


XUtdl dlllUUIlL LldlloLcrreLl, 

Unexpended balance, 




$3000 00 


Appropriation, 


$3000 00 



60 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 









CD ■ 


•CO 00 




00 


o 


o 


00 


CO 


■rt* as 


TF 




LC 


t- t- as 


T^ 




■*$ oo 








J5 


t- r-i 




CD 


^ 


tr- 


CM 


CM 


LO CM 


LO 




^ 


lo as o- 


00 




O M* 


m 






CO CM 




LO 


CM 


co 


o 


as 


CO 


00 




CO 


■<* CO t-H 


LO 




CO CO 






13 










CO 


i-H 


t-H 


co 


Cr- 




LO 


i> as 






t- 


X 






PQ 


5/3- 






















CM CO 








h 






































tf 






































O 






































Xu 






T3 
CD 
^3 


t> CM 


o 




TF 


o 


"* 


rf* 


CM t-H 


CO 


LO 


LO 


CO O LO 


CO 


CO 


CO CM 








LO 00 


o 




^ 


LO 


(M 


LO 


so tr- 


^ 


CO 


LO 


"tf LO CO 


t- 


o 


as lo 


C/) 






S3 


^ fc- 


o 




r-H 


tr- 


ir- 


•^ 


CM CO 


co 


Tf 


to 


o oo oo 


00 


CO 


CO CO 






0) 


CO CO 


o 




o 


CM 


o 


as 


CO CM 


CM 


L^ 


^ 


CM CM L— 


00 


-<* 


as cm 






a 


00 CO 


b- 




LO 


"* 


c- 


CO 


CM LO 




CO 


CO 


CM CO CO 


co 


LO 


CM 


Z 






x 


H H 


T— 1 










CM 


T* CO 




CO 




CO 00 


co 










W 


e/s- 






















i-H 


^* 






w 






































S 










































r- * 


eo o 


o 


CM 


Ttf 


o 


CM 


tr- 


CO o 


o 


LO 


o 


O t- Ttf 


o 


CO 


o o 


P* 






03 


CO o 


o 


CO 


00 


CO 


LO 


tr- 


co o 


o 


CO 


o 


O ^f T-H 


CO 


o 


o o 


< 

PL 






O 


00 o 


r-> 


as 


CO 


rH 


t- 


CO 


CO o 


o 


T^ 


o 


LO LO O 


rr 


CO 


o o 


* 




H 


CO t- 


o 


CO 


o 


CO 


.— « 


i-H 


co as 


o 


t- 


o 


(M O t>- 


as 


^ 


o o 


NO' 






00 CO 


tr- 


T— 1 


LO 


^ 


t- 


^ 


CM LO 


1— 1 


co 


^f 


CM CO O 


CO 


LO 


CO i-H 


W 








T— 1 T— ( 


1— 1 


i-H 








CM 


thh ^C 




CO 




co as 


CO 






5\ 






©9- 






















T-H 


^ 






ft. 


P* 


o 


































o 


<; 


03 


































te 
>* 


T3 


5-i 


o 






o 




o 




o 




CO 




CO 


CO 






CO 


CD 
r HH 


o 






o 




o 




o 




CM 




00 


^ 






S3 


CO 

03 


LO 






LO 




o 




LO 




o 




LO 


i-H 






uj 


3 


fc- 






CM 




LO 




00 




CM 




Tjt 


LO 






S5 

w 


<HH 








r— 1 




1—1 




1— 1 




CO 




as 


t- 






PL, 


cd 

Ph 


5-> 


<&r 


















1-H 




CO 








S 


l-H 

u 




































<< F: 




































PL, 


13 






co o 


o 


o 


T*l 


o 


CM 


tr- 


co o 


o 


CM 


o 


O t- 00 


^ 


CO 


2 ° 




6 
5-i 


CO o 


o 


o 


00 


CM 


LO 


tr- 


CO o 


o 


i-H 


o 


O ^ CM 


i-H 


o 


o o 




s 




CO o 


o 


to 


00 


_l 


tr- 


co 


00 o 


o 


"* 


o 


LO LO Tj< 


CO 


CO 


o o 






a 


OS t- 


o 


tr- 


tr- 


CO 


CO 


i-H 


-th as 


o 


LO 


o 


CM O (M 


»* 


rP 


2 o 






a 


tr- CO 


tr- 


1— 1 


CO 


-"* 


LO 


•^ 


O LO 


1— 1 


CO 


^# 


CM CO i-H 


CO 


LO 


CO t-H 






<1 


t— 1 i— 1 

60- 


1—1 


1— 1 








CM 


^r co 




CM 




CO LO 
i-H 


CM 






oo 






































Z 








bjo 


„ 








S3 

o 
















cd" 




o 








"-P 


S-4 

o 








• I-H 

-4-J 












r/T 




o 
S3 




)— 1 








c 


-M 








a 












a) 




03 




H 








E3 
o 


CD 








5- 












$- 

s 




Is 




< 








^3 








to 












to 




rP 








-1-5 


o 


o 








'So 












crj 








pes 
n. 






S3 
CD 

g 


< 

T3 


o 

13 








CD 
Ph 






c 

CD 






CD 

3 




o 




O 








S3 


S3 
OS 






M 


T3 


„ 




rT 3 
5-i 






S3 




X 

o 


S3 


Pd 






03 


c 


S-j 


- 




5-i 


aS 


zzi 








C3 CQ 


S3 


Ul 


d 


P-, 

PL, 






CD 

Q 


13ti§l - S3 '43 a $ „| 


J3 

o 


CD 
CD 
S-i 


5 . & 

^ W ffi 


as .S m O 
53 CD $-« S 4 

H W Ph Ph 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT, 



61 







a> 


























o 




i— 1 


00 




LO 


i— i 


00 


CM 


o 


as 






S3 




-t< 


1— 1 




CM 


as 


LO 


o 


00 


CO 






JS 




CTS 


CO 




00 


o 


a> 


CM 


as 


o 






15 












"* 


•^ 




^ 


CO 






OQ 












as 






CM 








T3 
0) 


o 


OS 


(M 


o 


LO 


as 


t- 


LO 


o 


1—1 


♦ 




T3 


O 


LO 


oc 


o 


OS 


o 


^ 


1— 1 


CM 


CD 




S3 
<D 

ft 


o 


O 


CO 


o 


CM 


as 


CO 


t~ 


o 


as 




lO 


OS 


OS 


LO 


LO 


LO 


CM 


CM 


LO 


CD 


ID 




CM 


t- 


^ 


CM 


OS" 


o 


00 


i—l 


CM 


^P 




X 








CO 


1—1 


CM 


CO 


as 


CM 


i— 1 


z 




W 






















»— i 
























- 


H 
O 




























15 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


LO 


t- 


o 


O 




o 


o 


o 


o 


CM 


o 


w 


i—i 


O 


o 


u 






o 


o 


o 


o 


1—1 


o 


CO 


as 


O 


o 






LO 


o 


o 


LO 


CO 


o 


t> 


CM 


o 


o 


i 






CM 


00 


LO 


CM 


as 


o 


00 


i—l 


LO 


LO 


C/D 












CO 


i—( 


CO 


CO 


as 


CM 


1— 1 


H 


























K 


























w 


u 
























£ 


O 


co 
$-1 










o 




o 








> 


t3 


cd 

=4H 










CM 




o 








< 

P- 


S3 


CO 
P3 










1—1 




o 








3 

CD 

05 


03 

H 










CO 
CM 












z 
























' 


< 


























CO 






o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


LO 


c- 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


i— i 


o 


o 




?H 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


co 


as 


o 


o 




a 


LO 


o 


o 


LO 


o 


o 


CO 


CM 


o 


o 


1— « 




ft 


CM 


00 


LO 


CM 


t- 


o 


^f 


i—l 


LO 


LO 


H 




<! 








co 


T— 1 


CO 


CO 


as 


CM 


1—1 


< 


























HH 


























CM 












S3 
CD 














a, 
























o 












s 












1 


& 












cd 
> 
o 














Ph 
























PL, 




S3 

<D 








ft 

a 












q-T 






s 

ft 

cd 
Q 


03 

Q 

o 

a 

CD 


m 
JD 

15 
o 

CO 

c 




i— i 

S3 
O 

u 
u 

CD 


'u 

CD 
<D 


S3 
S3 

CD 

> 


s 

5-1 
o3 

S3 


o 
o 


T3 

• I— c 

< 

CD 


"<D 
P3 








£ 


'a; 


03 


n 


<D 

m 


£ 


-)-» 


o3 


2 








o 


CO 


£ 


CD <D O !-» 

UPhEhO 


CO 


13 

GO 



62 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



ASSESSORS' REPORT. 



APPROPRIATIONS. 



Gypsy Moth and Brown Tail Moth, 


$ 2249 65 


Heating Plant, Manning and Winthrop Schools 


, 6000 00 


Selectmen's Department, 


1700 00 


Auditing and Accounting, 


1370 00 


Assessors Department, 


800 00 


Law Department. 


325 00 


Town Clerk's Department, 


460 00 


Election and Registration, 


500 00 


Town Hall, 


2300 00 


Police Department, 


4000 0U 


Fire Department, 


6590 00 


Forest Warden, 


100 00 


Tree Warden, 


400 00 


Park Commissioners, 


300 00 


Sealer of Weights and Measures, 


225 00 


Highway Department, 


11900 00 


Essex Road, 


1500 00 


Health Department, 


3500 00 


Outside Poor, 


8000 00 


Soldiers' Relief, 


1500 00 


State Aid, 


2500 00 


Care of Cemeteries, 


1700 00 


Town Farm, 


3400 00 


Note Payments, 


10300 75 


Interest, 


4700 00 


Electric Light Depreciation, 


2040 00 



$80060 40 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



63 



Brought forward, 
School Department, 
Memorial Day 
Averoff Wharf Property, 
Highway Department, (additional) 
Gypsy and Brown Tail Moth, (additional) 
Cultivation and propagation of clams, 
Overseers of the Poor, (additional) 



Additional, 



(July 17) 



County Tax, 

State Tax, 

State Highway Tax, 



Overlay, 



$80060 40 




42274 00 




250 00 




250 00 




3000 00 




38 05 




500 00 




200 00 


OC KHO API 


<J>l£.U,sJ « £* "*U 




1175 00 




200 00 


127,947 45 




8055 25 




9280 00 




1894 01 


$147,176 71 




1500 00 


$148,676 71 



Estimated Income, 



$14478 09 



Amount assessed on Polls and Property, $134198 62 

" 1423 Polls 2846 00 

" Property, 131352 62 

" Bank shares of Non-residents, 491 04 

Total amount assessed, 134689 66 



Amount of assessed Personal Estate, 

Real Estate, 



<« tt 



$1,737,744 
4,255,154 



$5,992,898 



64 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Value of buildings assessed, 


$2,956,075 


" " land 


1,299,079 


Number of horses, assessed 


436 




* cows, 


522 




' sheep, 






other neat cattle, 


197 




swine, 


87 




1 fowl, 


7475 




acres of land, 


17605 




persons, 


2100 




"on property, 


1168 




" on poll only, 


932 




' dwelling houses, 


1283 


Rate of Taxation, $22.00 on $1000.00. 




ADDITIONAL ASSESSMENTS. 




On personal property valued at 


$52,577 


On real estate valued at 


1,970 


Number of horses, 


3 


" cows, 


9 


" other neat cattle, 


2 


i* a 


acres of land, 


13 1-2 



The new safe which the Selectmen were authorized to per- 
chase for the Assessors' Department is now in use, and promises to 
be sufficient for twenty -five to thirty years to come. Incidentally 
the change furnishes much needed room in the old vault for the 
books and papers of the Town Accountant. 

The Income Tax law which goes into effect in 1917 will affect 
to some extent every tax payer on property. If the taxpayer has 
been paying on intangibles he must make a return not only to the 
Tax Commissioner, but also to the local Assessors, in default of 
which he will be assessed on personal estate to an amount not less 
than in 1916. So that instead of being helped by the lower rates of 
the new law, he will find his burdens increased. And if he has not 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 65 



been paying on intangibles, and is not the owner of such property, 
still it will be a prudent thing for him to make a return. His stock 
in trade may be smaller than in 1916, his cows or horses may be 
fewer in number, his auto may have depreciated twenty per cent, 
his other taxable assets may be reduced to the lowest terms, still if 
he fails to make a return, he must be assessed for as much as in the 
preceding year. 

The effect of the new law on the Town's finances will be 
slight for the year to come. For although personal, property to the 
amount of about seven hundred thousand dollars will go off the 
local lists, yet the Commonwealth will pay the Town as much as the 
tax on an equal amount at the rate of the year 1915: and the re- 
ceipts from that source, the amount of which will be known on or 
before the first of August, can be included as "estimated income." 
During the past year the Board has met the novel contention 
that a person is not "above the age of twenty years" until he is 
fully twenty-one: and that because he cannot vote until he is 
twenty-one, he is therefore not liable to a poll tax. It may be 
pertinent to state that there is no necessary connection between the 
privilege of voting and the liability to taxation. There was a time 
when youths of sixteen were liable to pay a poll tax, and thai liabili- 
ty continued for five years before they could vote. About seventy- 
five years ago a change was made from sixteen to twenty, but the 
voting age is still one year ahead. 

JOHN W. NOURSE, ) 

WILLIAM B. RICHARDS, [ Assessors. 
RICHARD R. GLASIER, ) 



66 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



REPORT OF THE SELECTMEN. 

The past year has been a very trying one for the various 
Town departments as it has been in all lines of business. The esti- 
mates for the year were based upon the conditions as they existed 
a year ago. The increased cost of labor and materials made it ex- 
tremely difficult, and in some cases impossible, to obtain the results 
desired on the appropriations made. 

In the highway department it was found early in the year, at 
the time roads should be gravelled and resurfaced, impossible to 
obtain teams at the price set by the Town. To meet this difficulty 
a special Town meeting had to be called to get the authority to pay 
the current prices for teams and labor. We wish to congratulate 
the citizens of the Town that we were able to retain the services of 
the Superintendent of Streets, Mr. J. A. Huckins, who has kept 
our highways in a condition that compares favorably with other 
cities and towns in the Commonwealth under very trying conditions 
and with an appropriation entirely inadequate. We are disappoint- 
ed in not having accomplished something definite on the Essex 
Road but a survey has been completed and plans made that will be 
put in operation in the early spring. A new pair of horses should 
be purchased the coming year for this department for use and 
safety in the fire department service. 

To the engineers and men of the fire department we extend 
our congratulations. To the Engineers for the excellent manner in 
which they have conducted the department and kept within their 
appropriation ; to the men for their prompt and faithful attendance 
at fires and meetings of the companies. 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 67 

We wish to thank the officers of the Police depertment for 
the efforts they have made to enforce the laws this year and while 
all that we hoped for has not been accomplished, we feel that a 
great improvement has been made over past no-license years. The 
force has worked together haimoniously and considering the high 
cost of living their pay has been quite inadequate for the hours and 
service rendered and deserve the thanks of our citizens. 

In the sickness and untimely death of our Town Treasurer 
and Collector, Mr, Chester W. Bamford, the Town has met with a 
serious loss. A conscientious and painstaking official who always 
had the interests of the Town in mind, always courteous and kind, 
his genial greeting to all will be missed. Great credit should be 
given to his assistant Mr, Wm. J. Riley and Mr. Frederick S, With- 
am, Town Accountant, for their efforts to get these departments 
straightened out in season to get out the town reports on time. 
They have worked days, nights and Sundays for the past two months 
and we extend to them our heartfelt thanks. 

If results are to be obtained the coming year increased ap- 
propriations must be made. Labor and materials of all kinds are 
higher and work for the Town cannot be done any cheaper than it 
can for the individual. If our roads are to be kept up under the 
increasing hard usage and requirements of auto travel money must 
be spent. The cost of repairs per mile today is much beyond that 
of twenty-five years ago. 

We wish to thank the Town officials and all others who have 
aided us in performing the duties of our office the past year. 

FRANK W. KYES, ) Selectmen 

JOHN A. BROWN, [ of 

GEORGE E. HODGKINS, ) Ipswich. 



68 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



POLICE REPORT. 

Board of Selectmen, 
Gentlemen : — 

I submit to you the following report of the Police Depart- 
ment for the year ending December 30, 1916. 

Total number of arrests, 252 
Arrests by months — January 18, February 21, March 15, April 
25, May 17, June 26. July 11, August 19, September 28, October 24, 
November 28, December 20. Total 252. Males 247. Females 5. 

CLASSIFICATION OF CRIME. 

Assault and battery, 30 

Adultery, 2 

Assault, 6 

Assault with dangerous weapon, 4 

Assault on officer, 2 

Breach of peace, • 4 

Carrying dangerous weapon, 1 

Drunkenness, 102 

Gaming nuisance, 10 

Larceny, 10 

Liquor nuisance, 6 

Non-support, 4 

Illegal communication with prisoner. 1 

Violating cigarette law, • 1 

Violating clam law, 1 

Illegal transportation of liquor. 4 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 69 



Manslaughter, 


2 


Contempt of Court, 


1 


Vagrants, 


28 


Violating milk law, 


1 


Violating Fish and game law, 


3 


Violating motor law, 


2 


Violating school law, 


1 


Poisoning horse, 


1 


Violating highway rules, 


1 


Violating liquor law, 


2 


Gaming, 


20 


Selling mixed oil and gasoline, 


1 


Keeping unlicensed dog, 


1 



252 



Crimes against persons, 32 

Crimes against property, 10 

Crimes against public order, 210 



Total, 252 



DISPOSITION OF CASES. 




Appealed, 


12 


Committed, 


41 


Discharged, 


26 


Filed, 


34 


Fined, 


91 


Probated, 


18 


Released, 


11 


Suspended, 


17 


Held for Grand Jury, 


2 



Total, 252 



70 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS. 
Accidents reported, 17 

Buildings found open and secured, 16 

Complaints investigated, 120 

Dogs killed, 12 

Insane persons committed, 6 

Injured and sick persons assisted, 7 

Lost children restored, 4 

Dangerous dogs reported, 2 

Horses killed, 1 

Dead bodies cared for, 9 

Arrests for out of town officers, 1 

Electric lights reported out, 74 

Amount of fines received from Third District Court, $840 08. 

I wish to extend my sincere thanks to the Board of Selectmen, 
Judge Geo. H. W. Hayes and other officials of the Third District 
Court, Town Counsel Albert F. Welsh, and to the officers and all 
others who have assisted me in my official duties. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN F. DUPRAY, 

Chief of Police. 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 71 



ENGINEERS' REPORT. 

To the Selectmen of Ipswich: * 

Following- is the report of the Board of Engineers of the Fire 
Department for the year ending Dec. 31, 1916: 

Number of men in the Department, 40 

" " box alarms, 16 

" still alarms, 34 

Total number of alarms, 50 

Value of department equipment, $15500 00 

" buildings occupied by department, 20000 00 

" fire alarm equipment 3500 00 

Number of feet of hose laid. 5250 feet 

Property threatened by fire, $47450 00 

Property damaged by fire, 11025 00 

Insurance on same, 30250 00 

Insurance paid, 5772 00 

DEPARTMENT EQUIPMENT. 

Steamer, 1 

Hook & Ladder, 4 1 

Auto-Combination Chemical and Hose, 1 

Hose Wagons, 2 

Reels, 6 

Fire Alarm Boxes, 19 

Number feet of hose 6000 

We wish to report that we have installed a storage battery 
system "Gamewell type" for our Fire Alarm, in place of our old 
gravity system, which is giving the best of results. 



72 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

By selling the Torrent Engine house in the Candlewood district, 
by vote of the town, it has left us without a place to house our 
jumper in that district, we would recommend the moving the house 
at Lathrop Bro's stables to some place in that district to house the 
same. 

We would recommend the purchasing of new hose to replace 

some of our old, the amount not to exceed $300, 

ARTHUR H. WALTON, / 

EDWIN M. POOLE, [ Engineers. 

WALTER G. BROWN, ) 



REPORT OF 

SUPERINTENDENT of STREETS 

Board of Selectmen, . 
Gentlemen, 

I herewith present a report of the work done by the teams 
during the year ending December 31, 1916, also an itemized list of 
the property in the Highway Department : 
Team No 1 worked 963 hours @ $0.62 1-2 

" " " " 1197 " @ .75 
Team No 2 " 951 " @ .62 1-2 

" " " " 1193 " @ .75 
Spare horse " 890 " @ .17 

986 " @ .23 1-2 

$3371 77 

Number of horses in department, 7, (including two owned by 
F. L. Burke & Son.) 

Cost of hay, grain and water, $1416 77 

Average cost per week for each horse, 3 89 



$ 601 


88 


897 75 


594 


38 


894 75 


151 30 


231 


71 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



73 





INVENTORY. 




Five horses, 




$1200 00 


3 pair double harness, 




125 00 


2 pair street blankets, 




25 00 


2 pair stable blankets, 




7 50 


3 two-horse carts, 




375 00 


2 two-horse sleds, 




100 00 


1 two-horse barge, 




100 00 


1 two-horse sleigh barge 


> 


50 00 


1 two -horse sweeper, 




225 00 


2 road machines, 




200 00 


3 road plows, 




20 00 


10 gravel screens, 




40 00 


2 two-horse shovels, 




10 00 


1 stone drag, 




y 5 00 


3 road drags, 




40 00 


1 two-horse stone roller, 




40 00 


1 steam roller, 




1500 00 


1 scarifier, 




400 00 


2 watering carts, 




375 00 


7 snow plows, 




100 00 


1 one-horse wagon, 




60 00 


1 oil wagon, 




600 00 


1 Ford truck, 




400 00 


Snow fences, 


, 


120 00 


All other tools, etc., 




600 00 




ip\J 1 J. 1 0\J 


Respectfully submitted, 






JOSEPH A, HUCKINS, 




Super 


intendent of Streets. 



74 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



REPORT OF THE 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND 

MEASURES. 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, 
Gentlemen : 

I have the honor to present to you the annual report of the 
Sealer of Weights and Measures of the Town of Ipswich for the 
year ending December 31, 1915, 

Within the last few years many changes in the laws pertaining 
to weights and measures have been made, and all weighing and 
measuring devices used in a commercial way must be sealed when 
accurate. Any person who uses an inaccurate weight, scale or 
measure is liable to prosecution. State inspectors and local Sealers 
are empowered to enforce these laws and the result has shown a 
great improvement in all methods of merchandising. Officials can- 
not supervise each sale, and we must ask the honest dealer and 
purchasing public to cooperate with us in that we may eliminate 
the very small percentage of ignorant and dishonest dealers. 

HAWKERS, PEDLERS AND ITINERATE VENDORS. 

The enforcement of this license law is now vested in the Com - 
missioner of Weights and Measures. Heretofore some of these 
traveling vendors have paid neither rent nor taxes and in many 
instances not even a license fee ; making an unfair competition from 
which many local merchants mast suffer. 

All food for sale in package form must be plainly marked with 
the net contents. The careful purchaser should examine each 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



75 



package, and observe the net contents, this gives the consumer the 
advantage of comparing packages put up by different dealers with 
the same goods sold in bulk form. If these precautions are neglect- 
ed one of the great advantages of this net weight law is lost. 

Respectfully, 

WILLIAM A. STONE, 



- 


Sealed 


Platform Scales over 5000 lbs. 


6 


" under " " 


43 


Counter " 


18 


Beam 


12 


Spring Balance Scales 


v 51 


Computing Scales 


23 


Slot Weighing Scales 


5 


Prescription Scales 


4 


Weights, Avoirdupois 


397 


Apothecary 


74 


Metric 


03 


Troy 


8 


Dry Measures 


20 


Liquid Measures 


138 


Oil Measuring Pumps 


13 


Molasses Measuring Pumps 


3 


Linear Measures 


21 


Steel Tapes 


1 



Non-Sealed Condemned 



Fees collected and paid to Town Treasurer 



$64 58 



76 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT. 



To the Selectmen of Ipswich, 
Gentlemen : 
I submit the following report of vital statistics of Ipswich as 
recorded by the Clerk. 

BIRTHS. 
Births in Ipswich for the year 1916. Whole number of births, 
168. 



Fathers born 


in 


Ipswich 


19 Mothers 15 




n * 




i 


Mass 


18 


17 




«< < 




t 


U S 


3 


7 




a i 




• 


Brit Prov 


26 


26 




a i 




( i 


England 


1 


1 




a t 




[< 


Ireland 





1 




it < 




< 


Scotland 


1 






«« i 




< 


Russia ) 








tt i 




< 


Austria \ 


62 


62 




»< < 




t 


Poland ) 








<• t 




t 


Greece 


32 


32 




tt t 




i 


Italy 


4 


4 




tt t 




t 


Portugal 


1 


1 




tt t 




a 


Denmark 





• 1 




tt t 




t 


Sweden 





1 




n < 




t 


Unknown 


1 


- 




Totals, 








168 


168 





IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 77 

Births by months — January 9, February 10, March 10, April 12, 
May 17, June 9, July 15, August 25, September 16, October 16, 
November 16, December 13. =168. 

Occupation of Fathers —Laborers 23, Mill Operatives 67, Farm- 
ers 7, Coachman L, Chauffeur 1, Machinists 7, Superintendents 3, 
Teamsters 11, Bank Clerk 1, Carpenters 2, Mail Carriers 2, Dentist 
1, Plumber 1, Painter 1, Heel factory workers 5, Fish Dealers 3, 
Foreman 2, Eatinghouse proprietors 2, Clerks 3, Grocers 4, Real 
Estate 1, Fruit Dealers 3, Granite Cutter 1, Insurance 1, Mason 1, 
Tool Maker 1, Meat Cutter 1, Merchant 4, Tailor 1 Manager 1, Milk 
man 1, Fisherman 1, Engineer 1, Gardener 1, Unknown 2, =168. 





MARRIAGES 






Whole number 108. 










Birthplace of Grooms. 




Birthplace 


s of Brides 


Russia, Austria, Poland, 


29 




29 


Greece 




23 




23 


British Provinces 




11 




15 


Ipswich 




11 




15 


Massachusetts 




21 




19 


United States 




7 




3 


England 




3 




2 


Ireland 




1 







Scotland 




1 







Sweden 




1 




1 


France 






108 




1 
108 


79 Grooms, 


residence 


in Ipswich. 




29 


tt 


" other places. 





108 

84 Brides, residence in Ipswich. 
24 " " "other places. 

108 



78 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

By months — January 10, February 7, March 4, April 4, May 11, 
June 9, July 15, August 6, September 8, October 11, November 18, 
December 5. Total, 108. 



By whom married : 




Roman Catholic Clergymen 


51 


Greek Clergymen 


21 


Congregational Clergymen 


18 


Methodist Episcopal Clergymen 


6 


Protestant Episcopal Clergymen 


3 


Baptist Clergymen 


2 


Denomination not given, (Clergymen) 


5 


Justice of the Peace 


2 



108 



DEATHS. 
Deaths in Ipswich, 110, 

Residing in Ipswich, 105 

" other places 3 

Unknown 2 



110 



Buried in Ipswich 87. In other places 
Under one year of age 
One year and under twenty 
Twenty years and under forty 
Forty years and under sixty 
Sixty years and under seventy 
Seventy years and under eighty 
Eighty years and under ninety 
Ninety years and over 
Unknown 



Males, 


53 


Females 


57 




110 


$ 23. 


Total 110 




28 




11 




15 




18 




10 




19 




6 




2 




1 



110 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



79 



Deaths By months — January 7, February 5, March 13, April 7, 
May 11, June 12, July 12, August 6, September 11, October 12, 
November 7, December 7. =110, 



Birthplace of deceased parents : 



Ipswich, 


Fathers 


5 14 


Mass 


< < 


20 


US 


<< 


9 


British Provinces 


<< 


23 


Eng., Ire. and Scot, 


« < 


11 


Russia j 






Austria r 
Poland ) 


<( 


16 






Greece 


a 


8 


Italy 


a 


1 


Denmark 


<< 


1 


Germany 


i < 


1 


Unknown 


<< 


6 



Mothers 



25 
13 

7 
17 
10 

16 

3 
1 

1 
12 



110 



110 



LICENSES. 
Whole number of dogs licensed. 168 males, 27 females. 
1 Kennel license, 5 dogs. 
Total number of dogs, 200. 

Billiard and Pool licenses 10, Bowling Alley 1, Victuallers 
licenses 5, Inholders licenses 3, Junk Dealers 4, Auctioneers 2, Ex- 
press Liquor license 1, and Certificate from Standard Oil Company 
to continue business. 

I have under the direction of the State Fish and Game Commis- 
sion issued 221 Hunters' Certificates. 

CHARLES W. BAMFORD, 

Town Clerk. 



80 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



OVERSEERS' REPORT. 

OUTSIDE POOR. 

The Overseers have had this year in the Outside Poor Depart- 
ment the same general problem to solve that they have every year. 
More properly speaking, it is two problems in one, being divisable 
as follows : (1) How to take proper care of the Town's depend- 
dents ; and (2) How to conserve the Town's finances. The law 
makes it obligatory for the town to provide for its poor, and the 
town in turn demands that the Overseers perform this important 
work with due regard to economy. It is only fair to the Overseers 
to state that the application of this double principle has character- 
ized their labors during the past twelve months. No dependent 
has been made to suffer through the practice of too rigid economy, 
and at the same time the town has met with no unnecessary losses 
by means of extreme generosity on the part of the Overseers, The 
work has been done to the best of their ability, and it is their hope 
and belief that the results will prove generally satisfactory. If 
others could have done better, it would have been because of su- 
perior wisdom and not truer desire or more sincere purpose. 

The following comparison of the expenditures of this and the 
preceding year is presented with no slight degree of pleasure : 
Total expense Outside Poor 1915 $10,733 05 

" 1916 9,127 15 



Showing a reduction this year of $1,605 90 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 81 

Three considerations are responsible for this gratifying result ■ 
(1) The careful and painstaking efforts on the part of the Board 
in the work of investigation, following up the cases with more than 
the usual degree of closeness, reducing allowances whenever and 
wherever circumstances would permit, and finding employment for 
those who reeded it without regard as (o whether they wanted it or 
not , (2) The coming into effect in the month of August of a law passed 
in 1911, by the provisions of which a person loses his or her settlement 
in a city or town by a five years' voluntary absence ; and, in die 
event of inability to gain settlement elsewhere, becoming a state 
case, the responsibility for whose care in event of need falling upon 
the Commonwealth. As the result of the operation of this law, we 
have been relieved of the burden of providing for a number of de- 
pendents who had had Ipswich settlements but were actually resid- 
ing in other places. (3) The greatly improved business conditions, 
making work plentiful, with a considerable advance in wages. 
There has been no need this year for any person, man or woman, 
who was mentally and physically able to work, to be out of employ- 
ment. 

We have shown in the foregoing that the total expense of the 
Outside Poor Department for 11^16 was $9,127. L5, The town was 
not that amount out of pocket, however, as will be seen by the fol- 
fowing figures : 

Tota 1 , expense Outside Poor 1916 $9,127 15 

Reimbursement from State, Cities and Towns, 1,346 84 



Balance being net cost to Ipswich $7,780 31 

This is a very moderate amount considering the high cost of 
commodities. Three dollars today will not go as far towards pro- 
viding for the necessities of the poor as two dollars did one year 
ago. 

It should be stated that $3,286,64, one-third of the gross 
amount, has been expended for Mothers' Aid undei Chap. 763, 
Acts of 1913. This law is a good thing, a great boon to mothers 
thrown upon their own resources with a family of small children to 
provide for. No taxpayer, with a heart of sympathy for the 



82 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



unforunate, will complain because of the increase in his tax bill 
occasioned by the operation of a law so just and humane. 

In conclusion the Overseers wish to say that it is their hope, if 
business and other conditions remain stationary, to effect a still 
further reduction in the expense of the Outside Poor Department 
in 1917. Yet it must be remembered that, beyond the fact that 
"the poor you have always with you," very little can be predicted in 
regard to future calls for aid. No prophet can state with certainty 
the number of dependents or the extent of their needs in coming- 
time. Present indications may be entirely at variance with future 
developments, 

TOWN FARM. 

After August 1st, 1912, when our new and large barn was 
destroyed by fire, it was necessary to transform the old hay barn 
into a habitation for the cattle. At that time we installed our hogs 
in a pen situated on the easterly side of that barn ; but as this did 
not meet with the approval of the inspectors, it was necessary to 
remove the hogs to their former place in the cellar of the barn 
which had been burned. As these two locations are in the neigh- 
bood of four hundred feet apart, we had been working, up to the 
middle of 1916, at considerable inconvenience, as many extra steps 
had to be taken in the performance of labor. Besides this, the 
manure from the cattle had to be thrown out at the side of the 
barn, where it lay in the burning sun with the liquid soaking into 
the ground, thus occasioning no small loss. 

This condition had to be endured until last year, when it was 
found that the barn had fallen into such a state of decay that it 
was necessary to put in an entirely new bottom. When the barn 
was built the rear sill was set close to the ground, the front sill was 
elevated less than a foot, and the air space was far less than it 
should have been. The result was exactly what might have been 
expected — the too early decay of sills and floor timbers, 

In addition, the barn had heen built without a cellar and locat- 
ed at the foot of a hill where water poured under it. This, togeth- 
er with the impossibility of preventing the liquid from the cattle 
inside and the manure outside from flowing beneath the barn, made 



• IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 83 

a condition unsuitable to the production and sale of milk. 

Such a state could not be longer tolerated, and the inspectors 
were rapidly coming to the place where patience would cease to be 
a virtue. Consequently, as the barn had to be jacked up in order 
to get the floor timbers set, the Overseers decided to slip the skids 
under and move the building to the cellar of the barn which was 
burned. This was done at a very moderate expense. The advan- 
tages gained may be stated as follows : 

[1] The conditions, so far as we know and believe, now meet 
all reasonable requirements of the inspectors. 

[2] The barn is situated so that decay from the former sources 
is impossible. The frame is strong and the appearance of the 
structure shapely. With the new weather boards and re-shingling 
on the sides, it will be in all essential respects as good as a new 
barn. 

[3] W T ith the horses, hogs and cattle brought together, many 
needless steps are avoided, and the work can be done with much 
saving of time. 

[4] The cow tie-ups are directly over the pen, so that the ma- 
nure can be thrown into it from above, giving the hogs a chance to 
root it over and improve it for spring use. The hog pen has a 
cement bottom, which will save loss of liquid. By thowing in some 
mulch occasionally, we shall make with the same number of cattle a 
much larger amount of manure and of a far better quality. This 
will give us the opportunity to do more planting and to top dress a 
portion of the hay land. 

[5] In the cellar in front of the hog pen there is room for the 
storage of most of our carts, tools, etc, so they no longer stand out 
in the weather. 

[6] We now have for the cattle in the winter season a natural 
cow-yard, sheltered from northerly winds by the hill and the barn 
itself. 

[7] We are saved a distance of about one-sixth of a mile in 
driving the cows to the pasture in the morning and back to the 
barn at night, and they do not pass directly in front of the house to 
leave their droppings in the carriages way. 



84 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

A member of the Finance Committee, and other gentlemen 
who have visited the Farm since the barn was moved, speak highly 
of the change and call it the best piece of work that has been done 
for many years. The old barn now covers half of the unsightly 
hole left by the burning of the new barn, and it will be a good 
stroke of policy for the town at some time when the finances will 
warrant it to cover the other half with an addition to the present 
structure. 

As propositions for the future, the Overseers offer the follow- 
ing; 

(1) To remove the building used during the past four years as 
a stable to the site of the carriage shed which disappeared in the 
flames of 1912, This will shield the barn doorway from northerly 
drafts. It will give housing for light carriages and afford room 
for a proper dairy. The cellar beneath it will give storage for 
vegetables. 

(2) To remove the ice house, hennery and corn crib to loca- 
tions near the barn on the southerly side of the road leading to the 
pasture. 

(3) To stack our wood and do all work where it will be hidden 
by the barn, thus removing from view all unsightly clutter. 

(4) To widen the road beyond the causeway, border it with 
quick-growing ornamental trees, and leave nothing but a clean 
sward on either side of the approach to the house. Ivy, or creeper 
same sort, will hide the bare walls and improve the appearance of 
the house. 

These plans have been approved by practical men, and it is 
proposed to carry them out without asking for the increase of a 
single dollar in the appropriation. Give us time, gentlemen, and 
the results will be satisfactory to the most exacting. 

Our sales of produce in 1915 amounted to $706.89. In 1916 the 
amount was increased to $814.10, with only $57.95 remaining 
uncollected. 

The inventory, Jan. 1, 1916, showed $3923.00. On Jan. 1, 1917, 
it had risen to $4905.00, an increase in property of $982.00. In 
addition to seven milking cows, we have of our own raising one bull 
and six heifers, three of which are coming-in this year. 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 85 

The increase in the cost per inmate is attributable to three 
facts. (1.) A decrease in the number of inmates, (2.) The cost 
of repairing, moving 1 , and equipping the barn, (3.) The advanced 
cost of groceries and clothing. 

A glance at the inventory will silence idle rumors regarding 
hay and potatoes. On Jan. 1, 1917, we had on hand forty tons of 
English hay, thirty tons of salt hay, and forty bushels of potatoes. 

Taken as a whole, we are much pleased with the year's work. 
We are deeply indebted to the Superintendent and assistant for 
what they have done, especially in the repair and moving of the 
barn, without whose efforts at no increase of wages the work could 
not have been accomplished. Honorable mention should also be 
made of Frank Thompson for his general usefulness, Herbert 
Witham for his care of the gardens, and Albert Peatfield for mason 
work and many odd jobs. The work of Mrs. Gidney and Miss 
Powell in the home has been of the usual good character, with Mrs. 
Julia Gallagher rendering efficient aid. 

Four of the members of our household during the year have 
passed into the Great Beyond. They are: Lizzie Dickinson, Florence 
Finlayson, Elbridge Sweet and Warren Robinson. Life is sweet to 
those in fortunate circumstance, but to others death often bring 
merciful release. May there be light in the Valley when they are 
called to pass through! 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANK T. GOODHUE, j Overseers 
WALTER F. GOULD, of 

CHARLES G. HULL, ) Ipswich 



86 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Rep o*t for the Year One Thousand Nine Hundred 

and Sixteen. 

The year of 1916 was a year of good health conditions for our 
town. There were about the same number of cases reported to the 
Board as usual, of diseases dangerous to the public health. 

General sanitary conditions were carefully looked after and we 
believe they will compare favorably with those found in other large 
towns and cities. We have adhered to the policy adopted several 
years ago and the general work of the Board has been along the 
line of that policy. 

The special work of the past year has been child welfare. We 
believe we have made a good beginning in this important consruc- 
tive work. For the period from July to January we had a welfare 
nurse on service whose duty it was to follow up all new born infants 
and to look after such cases of sickness among young children as 
the Board might require. A detailed account of this work will be 
found elsewhere in this report. 

Child welfare and tuberculosis are the two most important 
problems with which we have to deal ; and we desire to concentrate 
special efforts upon these problems during the coming year. 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 87 

Diseases dangerous to the Public Health were reported to the 
Board of Health as follows : 

Chicken Pox 7 

Diphtheria 10 

Rabies (dog bite) 1 

Measles 26 

Scarlet Fever 9 

Pulmonary Tuberculosis- 15 

Typhoid Fever 2 

Whooping Cough 31 

Anterior Polio-Myelitis 2 

Cerebro Spinal Meningitis 1 



Total 102 

Below are given the reports of the Agent, Milk Inspector, and 
Clerk's Report on the Farley Brook Account. 

AGENT'S REPORT. 
In submitting my report for the year 1916, I can only add what 
I have stated in previous reports that the sanitary conditions of the 
town has been in all respects equal to any past year. Complaints 
have been about the same as last year but in every case investi- 
gated prompt action was taken and no trouble was had in abating 
said complaints. 

Number of complaints received and investigated 43 

General repairs ordered in tenement houses 7 

Contagious disease cards posted 41 

Dead animals buried or otherwise cared for 12 

Cats . 1 

Dogs 6 

Hens • 5 



12 

Respectfully submitted, 

AARON LORD. Agent. 
Ipswich, Jan. 15, 1917. 



88 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

REPORT OF MILK INSPECTOR. 

In submitting my report for the year 1916 I hardly know what 
to say. In fact there is not much I can say as regards the milk 
situation except it is to repeat what I have already said in previous 
reports. In my inspections of the barns, milk rooms, etc., of the 
milk producers I found them in' a good clean and sanitary condition, 
showing that the rules and regulations as adopted by the Board of 
Health for the sale and handling of milk have been cheerfully and 
willingly complied with. 

There has been no contagion during the year where the ori- 
gin has been traced to the milk supply, which is in itself, satisfac- 
tory proof that we are blessed with good, pure wholesome milk, 
and as long as milk producers live up to their present standard, I 
can see where we shall have nothing to fear as regards our milk 
supply. 

To bear me out in my statements in regard to our milk supply, 
I herewith submit copy of letter received from the Dairy Board of 
State Board of Agriculture ; 



Boston, Mass., Jan. 15, 1917. 
Mr. Geo. W. Smith, 

Inspector of Milk, 

Ipswich, Mass.: 
Dear Sir : 

I am enclosing check for $10.00 which according to 
the propaganda which we put out in the spring, you are 
entitled to as winner of the third prize as Milk Inspector 
in the clean milk contest. I congratulate you upon having 
in your town such producers of clean milk. 
Very truly yours, 

P. M. HARWOOD, General Agent. 

Now as regards the ice cream situation, will say that I have 
made a careful inspection of all places where the same is on sale 
and found them in good, clean sanitary condition, and no complaint 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 89 

has been made in the manner in which they have been conducted. 

Number of milk licenses issued 29 

" icecream " " 17 

Oleomargerine dealers registered 2 

Amount received from all license fees $21 50 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE W. SMITH, 

Milk Inspector, 
Ipswich, January 15, 1917. 

FARLEY BROOK ACCOUNT. 
Paid to 
Joseph Johnson, collecting $10 80 

Edward Bodwell, labor 15 41 

W J Riley, cash paid out 4 50 

$30 71 

Collected by Joseph Johnson $108 00 

$108 00 

Balance on hand $77 29 

FREDERICK S. WITHAM, Clerk. 
Ipswich, Jan. 22, 1917. 

In the financial report printed elsewhere it will be seen that 
the Department closed its books with a balance of $276.97. After 
that date bills to the amount of $133.50 came in which were classed 
as unpaid bills. The Department tried to get in all bills before the 
books were closed. The net balance which the treasury will receive 
is therefore $143.47. 

THE HEALTH DILPENSARY AND CHILD WELFARE. 

Through the co-operation of the Ipswich Mills, the Day Nur- 
sery Association and the Federation of Churches, we were able to 
begin Child Welfare work under very promising auspices. The Mill 
gave the use of the house at 24 Estes Street, formerly occupied by 
the Day Nursery. They also furnished a large tent in the yard, 



90 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



which we found very useful during the hot days in August and 
early September. The day Nursery Association gave the use of its 
equipment which was supplemented by the equipment belonging to 
the Department, This made a well furnished and equipped place 
from which to carry on the work. The Federation of Churches 
paid for the extra nursing which was required while the Dispensary 
was receiving house patients, from August 15 to October 1. They 
also rendered valuable assistance in other ways. The Department 
paid for the services of the Welfare Nurse during the six months 
she was on duty, and for many other things necessary to carry on 
the work. 

Miss Edna Macafee, R. N., took charge of the work on July 10 
The balance of July was devoted to survey of conditions, and the 
Dispensary and Milk Depot were opened on August 1 and continued 
until November 1. The Welfare work was carried on until Jan- 
uary 15, 1917. 

The report of the Welfare Nurse shows that there were 205 
families in which there were children under two years of age. 
Sixty-seven children were born in the last six months of the year. 
These children were under constant observation until January 15. 
The calls made by the Welfare Nurse by months were as follows : 

July 157 

August 176 

September 197 

October 205 

November 192 

December 220 



Total 1147 

From August 1 to November 1, 750 quarts of pure milk were 
distributed by the Dispensary. This was paid for by the takers and 
was a boon to many infants during the hot period, 

From August 15 to October 1, ten house patients were treated 
at the Dispensary. Four was the greatest number at any one time. 
One day was the shortest period, and 24 days the longest period 
that any one patient was in the Dispensary. Three of these 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 91 

patients paid something toward board and care. The medical at- 
tendance was furnished by the several physicians in town. Clinics 
were held five days a week, one hour a day from August 15 to No- 
vember 1, by several physicians.' Eighty-four examinations were 
made and treatment prescribed, Of surgical cases there were 
treated one fracture of the forearm, one abcess of the breast, one 
abcess of the reck, one operation for removal of tonsils. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Received from the sale of milk 

*' patients in Dispensary 

Paid to 

H P Hood & Sons 
William A Banfill 
Louise G Cannon 
Hiller & Company 
Measures Company 
H A Russell 
Tougas & Tougas 
Total 

Balance $21 84 

We extend our most sincere thanks to all agencies and persons 
who assisted in carrying along the work. It is a work which the 
Community needs, but it is still in its formative stage and must be 
built up. Experience has already shown where some changes may 
be made for its betterment. The Dispensary building forms an ex- 
cellent centre from which welfare work and a closer study of tuber- 
culosis may be carried on. 

We ask that an appropriation of $133.. 50 be made for unpaid 
bills, and that $3500.00 be appropriated for the use of the Depart- 
ment for the ensuing year. 

Respectfully submitted. 

GEORGE E. MAC ARTHUR ) Board 

AARON LORD [ of 

GEORGE W SMITH ) Health, 
February 1, 1917. 



$74 92 




38 00 






$112 92 




$73 18 




2 25 




2 00 




29 




75 




6 80 




6 01 






$91 28 





92 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 





TA^K. 


COLEECTOR'S 


REPORT. 






Uncollected 


Collected 




Uncollected 


Year 


Jan. 1916 


1916 


Abated 


Jan. 1917 


1911 


S 130 78 


$ 107 38 




$ 23 40 


1912 


221 46 


130 22 




91 24 


1913 


3451 55 


1374 00 




2077 55 


1914 


8509 97 


3398 33 


S 4 50 


5107 14 


1915 


23633 61 


12141 10 


7 61 


11484 90 


1916 


135956 93 


109962 42 


278 31 


25716 20 


Totals 


$171904 30 


$127113 45 


$290 42 


$44500 43 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 93 
PERPETUAL CARE 

CEMETERY FUNDS. 

Amount ' Balance 

Name of Fund. Jan. 1916 Income Expense Jan, 1917 

Cogswell $376 74 $15 06 $391 80 

Andrews 259 64 10 38 4 00 266 02 

Giddings 163 55 6 54 3 00 167 09 

Potter 128 98 5 16 3 00 131 14 

Kinsman 69 90 2 80 1 50 71 20 

Samuel Blood 68 17 2 73 6 50 64 40 

Staniford 115 50 4 62 1 50 118 62 

Trow 392 45 15 70 3 00 405 15 

Dawson 143 86 5 75 2 00 147 61 

Birch 52 87 2 11 1 50 53 48 

Aaron Kinsman 56 22 2 25 1 50 56 97 

Varrell 349 11 13 96 2 00 361 07 

Eben Kimball 176 72 7 07 2 00 181 79 

Willcbmb 77 19 3 09 1 50 78 78 

Clarke 128 81 5 15 2 00 131 96 

Rogers and Johnson 107 02 4 28 3 00 108 30 

Hannah L Kimball 139 05 5 56 2 00 142 61 

George Kinsman 138 97 5 ,56 2 00 142 53 

Martha Lakeman 66 66 2 67 1 00 68 33 

Caldwell 1L5 16 4 61 119 77 

Pingree 97 67 . 3 91 1 50 100 08 

Young 25 42 1 02 1 00 25 44 

Coburn 305 65 12 23 5 00 312 88 

Mary Haskell 54 94 2 20 1 50 55 64 

Hovey 130 38 5 22 3 50 132 10 

Plouff 56 89 2 28 1 50 57 67 

Farley 139 52 5 58 2 00 L43 10 

John B Lamson 66 75 2 67 1 00 68 42 

Joseph Spiller 56 86 2 27 1 50 57 63 

Locust Grove 36 43 1 46 37 89 



M 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 





Amount 






Balance 


Name of Fund. 


Jan. 1916 


Income 


Expense Jan. 1917 


Mary E Peatfield 


111 


33 


4 45 


2 00 


113 78 


Lucy F Spiller 


61 


02 


2 44 


1 50 


61 96 


Josiah and Lydia H Lo: 


rd 140 


08 


5 60 


3 50 


142 18 


Eben Caldwell 


122 


19 


4 89 


3 l 


124 08 


M E Barber 


57 


56 


2 30 


1 50 


58 36 


Sarah E Durgin 


103 


S2 


4 15 


2 00 


105 97 


Joanna Kinsman 


119 


85 


4 79 


2 50 


122 14 


Charles W Giddings 


109 


60 


4 38 




113 98 


John Allen Brown 


121 


83 


4 87 


4 00 


122 70 


Millett and Kimball 


218 


31 


8 73 


7 00 


220 04 


Samuel Blake 


127 


15 


5 09 


2 00 


130 24 


William G Brown 


135 


43 


5 42 


2 50 


138 35 


Catherine W Clarke 


131 


33 


5 25 


2 00 


134 58 


Charles Palmer 


10S 


53 


4 34 


2 00 


110 S7 


Sally Roberts 


142 


22 


5 69 


2 00 


145 91 


Eugene Spinney 


129 


U 


5 19 


2 


133 03 


Mary M Fields 


63 


10 


2 52 


1 00 


64 62 


Luther Lord 


123 49 


4 94 


3 50 


124 93 


Ezra Lord 


12S 


20 


5 13 


1 50 


131 83 


Lucy H Brown 


129 


21 


5 17 


3 00 


131 38 


Patience H Bray 


115 


10 


4 60 


3 00 


116 70 


Richard T Dodge 


127 


94 


5 12 


2 00 


131 06 


Henry F Russell 


104 


16 


4 17 


2 50 


5 83 


George Haskell 


304 46 


12 18 


2 50 


314 14 


Theodore C Howe 


125 


63 


5 03 


2 00 


128 m 


Nathaniel Shatswell 


123 


30 


4 93 


2 00 


126 23 


George H Gilmore 


62 


21 


2 49 




64 70 


W A and I M Stackpol< 


? 155 67 


6 23 


2 00 


159 90 


Hannah H Pearson 


61 


08 


2 44 


1 50 


62 02 


Harry K Dodge 


123 64 


4 95 


2 CO 


126 59 


Henry S Holmes 




60 


4 26 


1 50 


109 36 


Caroline E Hodgkins 


54 93 


2 20 


1 50 


55 63 


Aaron F Brown 


63 45 


2 54 




6c, 


J Farley Kinsman 


115 


69 


4 63 


2 00 


118 32 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT, 



95 





Amount 






Balance 


Name of Fund, 


Jan. 1916 


Income 


Expense Jan, 1917 


Thomas Brown 


108 94 


4 36 


2 50 


110 80 


W P and A W Gould 


122 49 


4 90 


2 00 


125 39 


Lucy C Coburn 


242 34 


9 69 




252 03 


William H Kinsman 


114 24 


3 57* 


2 50 


115 31 


Caroline E Bomer 


. 109 20 


4 37 


2 00 


111 57 


Elizabeth H Bailey 


58 15 


2 33 


1 50 


58 98 


John Lane 


53 64 


2 15 


2 00 


53 79 


Hannah Parsons 


61 15 


2 45 


1 50 


62 10 


E and T F Cogswell 


111 27 


4 45 


3 00 


112 72 


Moses and Ezekiel Peabody 114 57 


4 58 


2 00 


117 15 


Charles H Cutter 


119 22 


4 77 


2 00 


121 99 


William & Abagail Haskell 53 84 


2 15 


1 50 


54 49 


Willis and Stacy 


118 08 


4 72 


2 00 


120 80 


George E Lord 


116 50 


4 66- 


2 00 


119 16 


Nora Frazier 


54 86 


2 19 


1 50 


55 55 


Franklin G Morris 


118 11 


4 72 


2 00 


120 83 


Robert Stone 


52 25 


2 09 


2 00 


52 34 


Emerson Howe 


118 34 


4 73 


4 20 


118 87 


Caroline E Lord 


101 43 


4 06 


4 50 


100 99 


Robert Gilmore 


229 74 


9 19 


3 00 


235 93 


John D Cilley 


116 81 


4 67 


2 00 


119 48 


James Griffin 


113 86 


4 55 


1 50 


116 91 


Eunice Caldwell Cowles 


115 88 


4 64 




120 52 


Ward F Kenny 


55 41 


2 22 


1 50 


56 13 


Josiah Dudley 


106 15 


4 25 


5 00 


105 40 


John C Kimball 


343 72 


13 75 


4 00 


353 47 


J F Caldwell 


178 52 


7 14 




185 66 


Rebecca C Hayes 


52 10 


2 08 


1 50 


52 68 


John Galbraith 


104 02 


4 16 


3 50 


104 68 


Thomas Holland 


111 94 


4 48 


2 00 


114 42 


John Choate 


77 16 


3 09 


2 00 


78 25 


Lucy Slade Lord 


115 59 


4 62 




120 21 


Walter E Lord 


107 09 


4 28 


2 00 


109 37 


John A Johnson 


109 78 


4 39 


2 00 


112 17 


Charles H Noyes 


53 74 


2 15 


1 50 


54 39 



96 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 





Amount 






Balance 


Name of Fund. 


Jan. 1916 


Income 


Expense ■ 


Jan. 1917 


Edwin H Damon 


53 74 


2 15 


1 50 


54 39 


Lemuel Smith 


51 67 


2 07 


1 50 


52 24 


Samuel J Goodhue 


54 24 


2 17 


1 50 


54 91 


Benjamin Newman 


108 72 


4 35 


1 50 


111 57 


Nathaniel Archer 


108 66 


4 35 


2 00 


111 01 


Abby J Purington 


109 15 


4 37 


2 00 


111 52 


Sarah A Seward 


107 90 


4 32 


2 00 


110 22 


Francis P Weeks 


54 16 


2 17 


1 50 


54 83 


George A Lord 


51 56 


2 06 




53 62 


William Heard 


104 16 


4 17 


2 50 


105 83 


Martha E Hanson 


213 27 


8 53 


3 00 


218 80 


Charlotte M Kimball 


105 10 


4 20 




109 30 


Mary J Patterson 


105 30 


4 21 


2 00 


107 51 


William L Rust 


50 54 


2 02 


1 50 


51 06 


E Maria Stone 


77 56 


3 10 


2 00 


78 66 


L S and E B Jewett 


254 10 


10 16 


4 50 


259 76 


John Cook 


50 50 


2 02 


1 00 


51 52 


Jonathan L Choate 


153 00 


6 12 


3 00 


156 12 


Sarah E Twombley 


102 00 


4 08 


3 00 


103 08 


N S and Eben Kimball 


101 00 


4 04 




105 04 


Gen Jas W Appleton 


252 50 


10 10 


10 00 


252 60 


Etta L Wentworth 


50 50 


- 2 02 


1 00 


51 52 


Baker and Dixon 


40 00 


1 60 




41 60 


Charles H Baker 


75 00 


3 00 


1 50 


76 50 


Jeremiah Brockelbank 


50 00 


1 50 


1 50 


50 00 


William H Russell 


50 00 


1 50 


1 50 


50 00 


Winthrop Low 


50 00 


1 50 


1 50 


50 00 


Edward Morrill 


50 00 


1 50 


1 50 


50 00 


Jerry Spiller 


100 00 






100 00 


Abbie M Fellows 


50 00 






50 00 


Nathaniel R Farley 


100 00 






100 00 


Eunice & Elizabeth Farley 50 00 






50 00 


Elizabeth L Chapman 


150 00 






150 00 


Clara B Dobson 


50 00 






50 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



97 



Name of Fund. 

Charles D Weeks 
Charles S Willcomb 


Amount 
Jan, 1916 

75 00 
100 00 


Income 


Balance 

Expense Jan. 1917 

75 00 
100 00 


Income undivided 


$15,374 49 


$584 98 


$261 20 $15,698 27 
15 06 


Total Fund 


$15,713 33 



"Income credited $1.00 too much in 1915, 



98 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

RECEIPTS. 
Amount of Fund, January, 1916 $14509 75 

New Funds during the year $875 00 

Income from investments 589 78 



EXPENDITURES. 
Paid care of lots $261 20 



$1464 78 

$15974 53 

$261 20 

Balance January, 1917 . $15713 33 



INVESTMENT ACCOUNT. 
Town of Ipswich, Electric Light, 4s 

" " " Water, 4s 

City of Fitchburg, School, 4s 
Water Front Improvement Loan, 4s 
Ipswich Savings Bank 

Total 



$2000 00 


7500 00 


3000 00 


2100 00 


1113 33 


$15,713 33 



INCOME ACCOUNT. 






Balance undivided January, 1916 




$ 10 26 


Town of Ipswich, Electric Light Loan 


$ 80 00 




V " " Water 


300 00 




City of Fitchburg, School Loan 


120 00 




Ipswich Savings Bank 


89 78 


$589 78 








$600 04 


CREDIT. 






Cemetery Funds 


$584 98 




Income undivided, January, 1917 


15 06 


$600 04 







IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 99 

ELIZABETH M. BROWN FUND. 

Town of Ipswich, in trust, the income to be used under the di- 
rection of the Selectmen, by the Agent of the Society for the Pre- 
vention of Cruelty to Animals. 

Balance, January, 1916 $765 20 

Income 46 82 

$812 02 

Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank, January, 1917 $812 02 



JOHN C. KIMBALL FUND. 
Town of Ipswich, Trustee, under will of John C. Kimball, in- 
come to be used for the purchase of books for the Ipswich Public 
Library, 

Balance, January, 1916 $553 52 

Income 33 84 

$587 36 

Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank, January, 1917 $587 36 



100 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



TREASURERS DEPARTMENT. 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



RECEIPTS. 



Balance, January, 1916 
Taxes, 1911 
1912 



$ 107 38 
130 22 

1913 1374 00 

1914 3398 33 

1915 12141 10 

1916 109962 42 
Moth, 1912 5 01 

1913 10 00 

1914 50 35 

1915 131 76 

1916 1057 54 
Street Sprinkling, 1913 13 20 
Department Bills, (1914-1915) 1110 02 
Commonwealth or Massachusetts, State Aid 2412 00 

Estimated Revenue : 
Corporation Tax $4912 08 

National Bank Tax 1271 20 

Miscellaneous license fees 379 50 

Criminal fines 840 08 

Essex County, dog licenses 308 65 

-•" " rent Court Rooms 325 00 

Various cities and towns, Poor % 197 33 
Com, of Mass,, Poor <fr f 1916 277 00 

" " " Mothers' Aid 675 51 

Town of Rowley, tuition 2925 00 

Com, of Mass,, Soldiers' Exemption 137 83 
All other estimated revenue receipts 3537 37 

$15786 55 

Temporary Loans $100000 00 

Trust Fund income 670 44 

Com. of Mass., Highway Refund 162 36 

" " " Street Railway Tax 1040 40 

Bay State St Ry Co., Excise Tax 1604 52 

" " " " Snow Refund 138 58 



$19,974 43 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT, 



101 



Health Dept., board of patient at Farm $ 240 

Various parties, refunds to School Dept 23 

BurleyFund, " " " " 150 

Boston Bridge Works, refund to Scales Dept 27 



Water Front Improvement Loan 
Electric Light Dept., light, power, etc 

note issue 
Water Dept., rates, supplies, etc 

note issue 
Interest on taxes 

" " deposits 
C D Parker & Co., interest refund 
Cemetery Trust Funds, new accounts 
C W Bamford, Treasurer Trust Funds 
Brown School Fund, Transportation °{c 



Total 



3000 

19747 

2000 

14824 

5000 

1263 

587 

40 

875 

261 

90 



00 
50 
00 
57 
00 
02 
00 
03 
00 
45 
87 
00 
00 
20 
00 



$299,435 82 
$319,410 25 



EXPENDITURES. 



Accountant's Warrants : 






Department orders 


$148691 48 




State Tax 


9280 00 




County Tax 


8055 25 




National Bank Tax 


520 11 




State Highway Tax 


1894 01 




Temporary Loans 


90000 00 


_ 


C W Bamford, Treasurer Trust Funds 


670 -44 




Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Refunc 


I 14 87 




Interest on Temporary Loans 


1866 90 




" " Debt 


13084 50 




C W Bamford, Treasurer Trust Funds — 






Perpetual Care 


875 00 




Brown Fund, Transportation °fc 


108 00 




Maturing Notes 


12350 00 




Averoff Wharf Property 


3250 00 




Winthrop School Addition 


8610 55 




Building Committee 


32 00 




Miscellaneous Accounts — to offset void checks" 517 36 








$299,820 47 


. 




Balance 




19,589 78 


Total 


$319,410 25 



102 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



BALANCE SHEET. 




DR. 




Cash on hand, 




$19589 78 


C W Bamford, Coll. 


tax 1911, 


23 40 




tax 1912, 


91 24 




tax 1913, 


2077 55 




tax 1914, 


5107 14 


• 


tax 1915, 


11484 90 




tax 1916, 


25716 20 




moth 1908- , 09, 


38 71 




moth 1911, 


2 76 




moth 1912, 


19 88 




moth 1913, 


68 07 




moth 1914, . 


35 44 




moth 1915, 


77 69 




moth 1916, 


259 99 




street sprinkling 1911, 


5 49 




street sprinkling 1912, 


11 59 




street sprinkling 1913, 


40 26 




Electric Light, 


2587 55 




Water, 


6994 91 




Department bills, 


1832 59 


Revenue 1917, 




2419 40 


Sinking Fund, 




95129 18 


Net Bonded Debt, 




223720 82 


Trust Funds, 




17052 71 

< P°04707 AH 




<pov'±ivl t±l 


Total, 


$414,387 25 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



103 



BALANCE SHEET. 



CR. 



Overlay 1912 

" 1913 

" 1914 

" 1915 

" 1916 
Insurance, Fire Loss 
Timporary Loans 
Electric Light Revenue 
Water Revenue 
Moth Suppression 
Central Street Macadam 
Market Street 
Essex Road 
Education 
Independence Day 
Electric Light Department 
Water Department 
Refunding Loan 
Central Street Macadam Loan 
Ceneral Fire Station Loan 
Burley Schoolhouse Loan 
Electric Light Loan 
Water Loan 

Winthrop Schoolhouse Loan 
Heating Plant Loan 
Water Front Improvement Loan 
Cemetery Funds 
Kimball Library Fund 
Brown Animal Fund 

Excess and Deficiency 

Total 



$ 389 38 


8U4 15 


1 97 


1052 10 


1218 99 


2104 80 


40000 00 


2587 55 


6994 91 


2116 26 


53 49 


2 36 


1500 00 


5 84 


4L 42 


1337 77 


957 26 


7700 00 


1000 00 - 


11000 00 


3000 00 


60300 00 


202350 00 


23000 00 


7500 00 


3000 00 


15653 33 


587 36 


812 02 


«pOi/ l,UlU tjXJ 


17,316 29 


$414,387 25 



104 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

AUDITOR'S STATEMENT. 

I certify that I have examined the accounts of the Treasurer 
and find them correct, and find the balance in the hands of Treasur- 
er to agree with the report submitted. 

I have approved vouchers for all bills paid and find them to 
agree with the warrants to the Treasurer. 

ARTHUR H. WALTON, Auditor. 



NOTES MATURING 1917. 



Central Fire Station Loan 


$1000 00 


Burley Schoolhouse " 


1000 00 


Central Street Macadam Loan 


1000 00 


Refunding Loan 


700 00 


Winthrop Schoolhouse Loan 


2000 00 


Heating Plant Loan 


500 00 


Water Front Improvement Loan 


300 00 


Electric Light Loan 


3350 00 


Water Loan 


2150 00 




$12,000 00 



INTEREST ON DEBT, 1917. 

Central Fire Station Loan $ 485 00 

Burley Schoolhouse " 112 50 

Central Street Macadam Loan 40 00 

Refunding Loan 308 00 

Winthrop Schoolhouse Loan 920 00 

Heating Plant Loan 300 00 

Water Front Improvement Loan • 120 00 

Electric Light Loan 2400 00 

Temporary Loans (Estimated) 2100 00 



$6,785 50 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



105 



BONDED DEBT. 


TITLE OF LOAN 


AMOUNT. 




PAYABLE. 


Refunding 


$ 7700 00 


Serially 1917-1927 


Central Street Macadam 


1000 00 


i 


" 1917 


Central Fire Station 


11000 00 




" 1917-1927 


Burley Schoolhouse 


3000 00 




" 1917-1919 


Winthrop Schoolhouse 


23G00 00 




" 1917-1935 


Heating Plant 


7500 00 




" 1917-1931 


Water Front Improvement 


3000 00 




" 1917-1926 


Electric Light 


60300 00 




" 1917-1937 


Water Notes 


42350 00 




" 1017-1936 


Water Bonds 


130000 00 




1924 


Water Bonds 


30000 00 




1927 



Total Bonded Debt $318,850 00 
Sinking Fund (Water Dept) 95,129 18 

Net Bonded Debt $223,720 82 

TEMPORARY LOANS. 

First National Bank, Ipswich $20,000 00 
First National Bank, Ipswich 10,000 00 

Sinking Fund, Water Dept. 10,000 00 



April 3, 1917 
June 20, 1917 
Sept. 29," 1917 



106 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



LIST OF UNPAID 1916 BILLS. 

SELECTMEN. 
Ipswich Chronicle, printing 
Albert F Welsh, legal services 
City of Beverly, wire inspection 
John E Dodge, ringing bell 
John W Goodhue baling press 
John F Wippich, clock repairs 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR. 
Wm J Rile*, salary $23 33 



$ 4 40 


51 24 


62 00 


8 32 


33 00 


25 00 



TOWN CLERK. 
Chas W Bamford, cash paid out $3 25 



ELECTION AND REGISTRATION. 
H A Russell, meals $9 35 





TOWN HALL. 




W N Prescott, supplies 




$ 2 68 


A I Savory, supplies 




4 63 


Lathrop Bros., fuel 




54 00 


J J Merrill, wiring 




24 18 



$183 96 



$23 33 



$3 25 



$9 35 



$85 49 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 10 r 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 




Albert F Welsh, balance of salary 


$16 67 


" " legal services 


10 00 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

W E Tucker, M. D., medical attendance 

W N Prescott, supplies 

Geo G Dexter, photos 

John W Goodhue, supplies 

C C Caldwell's Garage, auto hire 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Electric Light Dept., care fire alarm 

J J Merrill, " " 

Ipswich Gas Light Co., gas 

C S Tyler, supplies 

C F Chapman & Son ; supplies 

Western Union Tel Co., time service 

E Newton Brown, rent 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

W N Prescott, supplies 

John W Goodhue, supplies 

E J M Scahill, fumigation 

American Express Co., express 

H H Roper, milk 

G G Bailey, M. D. medical attendance 



$ 2 00 


60 


5 00 


3 50 


21 75 



$ 25 00 


16 66 


3 80 


2 19 


1 50 


1 25 


140 GO 



$42 31 


75 


48 50 


1 05 


12 20 


28 75 



$26 67 



$32 85 



$190 40 



$133 56 



108 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

John W Goodhue, supplies $ 4 00 

CS Tyler, " 7 82 

A I Savory, " 91 02 

W N Prescott, " 2 90 

Canney Lumber Co., lumber 6 70 



— $112 44 



TOWN FARM. 

C C Caldwell's Garage, repairs 

A C Damon, supplies 

Lathrop Bros., fuel 

C F Chapman & Son, supplies 

B J Conley, supplies 

Geo B Brown grain 



$ 1 40 


2 


40 


17 


84 


3 


15 


8 


30 


39 25 



OUT POOR DEPARTMENT. 



F L Collins, M. D., medical attendance 


$ 12 00 


M C McGinley, M. D„ " 


15 00 


E J M Scahill, use of ambulance 


46 50 


N Burnham, rent 


11 08 


Beverly Hospital, board and care 


10 50 


Tougas & Tougas, groceries 


9 25 


Town of Danvers, aid 


34 00 


Town of Ashland, 


167 34 


City of Revere, " 


85 89 



SOLDIERS' RELIEF. 
G G Bailey, M. D., medical attendance $11 25 



$72 34 



$391 56 



$11 25 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 109 



PUBLIC SCALES. 

C A Hatch, carpentry 
A D Mallard, trucking 
Manzer & Damon, carpentry 
A J Barton & Son, labor 
American Express Co., express 
Edward Perkins Lumber Co., lumber 



$12 75 


5 87 


18 17 


17 85 


1 10 


6 45 



$62 19 



EDUCATION. 

Water Dept., water $ 77 88 

D A Grady, team 3 50 

J F Wippich, repairs 75 

Hiller & Co., supplies 10 03 

Manzer & Damon, carpentry 58 71 

A I Savory, supplies 11 50 

New England Tel & Tel Co., telephone 6 51 

C F Chapman & Son, supplies 2 55 

E J M Scahill, fumigation 21 00 

Canney Lumber Co., lumber 27 74 

George FaU, fuel 10 00 

E E Babb & Co., supplies 109 11 . 

J L Hammatt Co., " ' 43 48 

Ipswich Gas Light Co., gas 35 60 

W N Prescott, supplies 26 66 

$445 02 

Total $1,783 66 



110 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



LIST OF TOWN PBOPERTY. 

School Houses 

Public Buildings 

Public Grounds 

Town Farm 

Cemeteries 

Heard Wharf 

Averoff Wharf 

■ Turkey Shore Pasture 

Woodland, Lineboook 

Woodland, Common Fields 

Thatch Bank, Great Flats 

Thatch Bank, Third Creek 

Two Gravel Pits Washington Street 

Gravel Pit, Essex Road 

Fire Apparatus 

Highway Department 
In addition to the property enumerated above, there is the 
shore, beach and other property given to the Town by the Com- 
moners, value of which is not estimated. The valuation of Water 
Works and Electric Lighting Plant will be found in the Water and 
Light Report. 



20,000 00 


40,000 00 


10,000 00 


30,000 00 


5,000 00 


100 00 


3,250 00 


1,000 00 


200 00 


75 00 


1,500 00 


300 00 


15,000 00 


6,717 50 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 113 



SUPPLEMENTARY UNPAID BILLS. 

The following bills were received after the preceding list of 
unpaid bills had been printed. 

LAW DEPARTMENT. 

Horace I. Bartlett, legal services and expenses 
Jeffries' Neck case, Feb. 10, 1903 to March 
21, 1916, $2265 63 

Geo H W Hayes, legal services and expenses 
Jeffries' Neck case, May 5, 1903 to Dec, 
28, 1916, 516 30 

Hayes & Schofield, legal services and expenses 
Jeffries Neck case, Dec, 1, 1913 to March 
8, 1916, 568 00 
Total, $3,349 93 



TOWN OF IPSWICH. 



T W ENTY-THIRD 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



W A T E R 



AND 



MUNICIPAL LIGHTING 
COMMISSIONERS 




FOR THE YEAR 1916. 



IPSWICH, MASS.: 
GEO. A. SCHOF1ELD 8c SON. PRINTERS. 

eS^^HS. 686 

1917 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



OFFICERS OF 

WATER AND MUNICIPAL LIGHTING 

COMMISSION. 



COMMISSIONERS. 

Geo. A. Schofield, Chairman, Term expires 1918 

Geo, H. W. Hayes, " " 1919 

William H. Rand, " " 1917 

CLERK. 

Geo. A. Schofield, Office, Room 5, Town House 

Office hours from 1 P. M. to 5 P. M. every week day 

except Saturday. Telephone 92-R, 

TREASURER. 
William J. Riley, Office at Town House 

Manager Electric Eight, Geo. A. Schofield 

Chief Engineer, Edmund A. Russell 

Line Superintendent, Electric Light, C. J. Dupray 

Foreman, Water Department, William P. Gould 

Office of Commissioners, Room 5, Town House 

Meetings held every Friday at 8 P. M. 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



CONSTRUCTION DEPT. 

PIPE LINE. 

1. LIST OF BILLS AND AMOUNTS PAID FOR THE YEAR 
ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1916. 



PAID TO 



FOR WHAT 



AMOUNT 


$433 40 


39 37 


49 63 


S 65 


2 53 


17 50 


11 25 


30 38 


2 25 


35 86 


28 96 


9 71 


56 82 


23 21 


23 77 


17 44 


48 80 


32 48 


2 67 


24 48 


11 68 


11 68 


2 63 


70 


11 45 


69 73 


20 78 


12 75 



William P Gould, labor, 

Charles H Parsons, 

George Burbridge, 

David Hinckley, 

John Cronin, 

C Patch, 

Jos Robishaw, 

Harry Sheppard, 

S Comeau, 

William Lane, 

George Johnson, 

Samuel Lavoic, 

Fred Bodwell, 

William Garrette, 

John Evart, 

F A Dow, 

Frank Perkins, 

Edward Nutter, 

Harry Ward, 

John Douglass, 

James Gallant, 

Stephen Lamoth, 

A J Brennan supplies, 

C F Chapman & Son, 

B. & M. R, R, Co., freight, 

Chad wick Boston Lead Co., lead, 

Crane Co,, pipe, 

Edmund Wile, - teaming, 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT, 



PAID TO 


FOR WfiAT 




AMOUNT 


John W Goodhue, 


supplies, 


■ 


$50 10 


Am, Ex. Co., 


express, 




3 89 


Jos A King, 


labor and supplies, 


9 80 


Lathrop Bros., 


labor and supplies, 


12 75 


W P Reilly, 


supplies, 




7 20 


W H Rand, 


labor and supplies 


191 23 


Joseph Ross, 


a n 


i t 


73 00 


Lumsden & Van Stone, 


a it 


< . 


80 90 


Peoples Express Co., 


express, 




3 25 


D A Grady, 


teams, 




64 50 


Canney Lumber Co., 


lumber, 




2 25 


A D Mallard, 


express, 




5 53 


Braman Dow Co., 


pipe, 




75 21 


C H Brooks, 


supplies, 




15 


F McKenney, 


use of boat, 




21 00 


Walworth Mfg. Co., 


pipe, 




348 93 


H E Poor, 


use of boat, 




6 00 



Total, 



$1,991 25 





SERVICE PIPE. 


William P Gould, 


labor 


George Burbidge, 


<< 


C Patch, 


<< 


C H Parsons, 


«« 


J Robeshaw, 


a 


W Edgerly, 


«< 


J Gaudette, 


< < 


S Lavoic, 


<« 


Peter Italian, 


«« 


Crane Co., 


pipe 


J W Goodhue, 


supplies 


C H Brooks, 


<« 


National Meter Co., 


meters 


A D Mallard, 


express 


Chad wick Lead Co', 


lead pipe 



$195 00 
26 73 
17 50 
24 48 
7 03 
11 82 

4 78 
2 25 
2 25 

103 20 

5 78 
1 29 

313-60 

6 14 
128 53 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



RAID TO 



FOR WHAT 



AMOUNT 



D A Grady, 


teams 


B&MRRCo., 


freight 


H E Poor, 


boat 


C F Chapman & Son, 


supplies 


Mueller Mfg Co., 


<< 


Hersey Meter Co., 


meter 


C W Barton, 


boat 


American Ex Co., 


express 


Walworth Mfg Co., 


supplies 



Total, 



$12 50 


1 29 


2 00 


3 10 


122 51 


22 32 


75 


26 


93 21 



$1,108 32 



MAINTENANCE. 



William P Gould, 

W T Edgerly, 

C Patch, 

J Cronin, 

Prince Smith, 

John Gaudett, 

Jos Robeshaw, 

S S Bayley, 

Ipswich Chronicle, 

C F Chapman & Son, 

A D Mallard, 

H B McArdle, 

J H Lakeman, 

Cotton & Woolen Mfg Co., 

Knowlton Rubber Co., 

Revere Rubber Co., 

Chester W Bamford, 

W N Prescott, 

Hart Packing Co., 

A C Damon, 

C L Lovell, 

D A Grady, 

Thos Groom, 



labor 



use of boat 

printing 

supplies 

express 

supplies 

stamped envelopes 

insurance 

supplies 
<< 

salary treasurer 
supplies 



cement 
teams 
plan book 



$393 00 

112 92 

87 50 

2 10 
1 96 

3 65 
3 65 

12 50 

58 30 

3 10 

12 05 
50 

63 72 
50 00 
20 02 

13 10 
91 66 

1 25 

3 28 
43 69 

9 55 

4 00 
6 00 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



PAID TO 



FOR- WHAT 


AMOUNT 


painting hydrants 


$20 88 


supplies 


61 41 


< « 


45 


labor and supplies 


26 15 


supplies 


9 00 


typewriting, 


2 60 


Commissioner, 


100 00 


a 


100 00 


< ( 


100 00 


bookkeeper, 


130 00 


collector, 


58 34 


clerk and manager, 


40C 00 


Bond, 


40 00 


Insurance, 


44 29 


n 


18 75 


telephone, 


33 73 


deposit box, 


5 00 


supplies, 


9 27 


express, 


87 


fire brick, 


2 60 


pumping contract, 


2000 00 


repairs, 


1 00 


insurance, 


40 00 


supplies, 


55 


labor and supplies, 


13 44 



Frank H Girard, 
G P Anderson, 
F L Burke & Son, 
John E Greene, 
Hobbs & Warren, • 

Amelia Clarke, 
Geo A Schofield, 
William H Rand, 
Geo H W Hayes, 
Annie Atherley, 
W J Riley, 
George A Schofield, 
American Surety Co., 
G A Barker, 
Westchester Ins. Co., 
N, E.Tel. & Tel. Co., 
First National Bank, 
Garlock Packing Co., 
American Ex. Co., 
Waldo Bros., 
Electric Light Dept., 
Ipswich Mills, 
Mutual Boiler Ins. Co,, 
Thorp & Martin, 
Austin L Lord, 

Total, 

SINKING FUND. 
Sinking Fund Commission, annual contribution, 

NOTE PAYMENT. 
No^es Paid by Treasurer, 

INTEREST, 
Interest paid Various parties by Treasurer, 



$4215 83 
$4410 42 
$1900 00 
$8070 00 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



II. RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR THE YEAR 
ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1916. 



Receipts. 


Disbursements. 


Balance, Dec. 31, 1915,$ 929 05 


Maintenance, 


$ 


4215 83 


Water Rates, 14630 97 


Services, 




1108 32 


Services, 105 87 


Pipe Line, 




1991 25 


Appro. Note Payment, 1900 00 


Sinking Fund, 




4410 42 


Note Issue, 5000 00 


Interest, 




8070 00 


Miscellaneous receipts, 87 19 


Note Payment, 




1900 00 




By Cash Balance, 
Total 


$5 


957 26 


Total, $22,653 08 


52,653 08 



III. BALANCE SHEET FOR YEAR ENDING DEC. 31, 1916 



Bonds issued, $160000 00 

Notes, outstanding, 42350 00 
Premiums on bonds, 10412 58 
" notes, 60 75 

Appropriations, 33224 20 

Miscellaneous receipts, 165 43 
Water rates, 234 L02 47 

Filter appropriation, 143 28 

Appro, notes payable, 7589 25 



Total, 



$488,047 96 



$ 3350 00 



Engineering, 
Land damages and 

rights of way, 3599 

Pumping station, 14246 
Pumps and machinery, 19452 

Storage basin, 27693 

Bull Brook Supply, 1778 

Distributing reservoir, 17827 

Pipe line construction, 124469 

Service pipe " 21075 

Store house, 178 

Miscellaneous, 2834 



Cost of construction, 236506 
Interest on bonds, 141572 

Maintenance, 76353 

Material and supplies, 1121 
Water rates due and 

unpaid, 6723 
Services due and unpaid, 271 

Sinking fund payment, 24541 

Cash balance, 957 



12 
94 
65 
59 
60 
56 
90 
63 
70 
20 

89 
20 

57 
44 

12 

79 
69 
26 



Total, 



$488,047 96 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



IV. SUMMARY OF COST OF CONSTRUCTION TO DEC. 31, 1916 



Construction Account. 


Dec. 31, 1915 
$ 3350 00 


Year 1916. 


Dec. 31, 1916 


Engineering, 




$ 3350 00 


Land damage & rights of way 


3599 12 




3599 12 


Pumping Station, 


14246 94 




14246 94 


Pumps & pumping machinery 


19452 65 




19452 65 


Storage Basin, 


276'J3 59 




27693 59 


Bull Brook supply, 


1778 60 




1778 60 


Distributing Reservoir, 


17827 56 




17827 56 


Pipe line construction. 


122302 60 


$2167 30 


124469 90 


Service pine construction 


20102 61 


973 02 


21075 63 


Store House, 


178 70 




178 70 


Miscellaneous, 


2834 20 




2834 20 




$233,366 57 


$3,140 32 


$236,506 89 



V. 




SINKING FUND. 


Receipts. 


Investments. 


Appropriation 


1895, 


$ 1700 U0 


Ipswich Savings Bank, $ 87 48 


< ( 


1896, 


1759 50 


Ipswich Water Loan, 48350 00 


a 


1897, 


1899 08 


Ipswich Elec. Lt. notes, 21500 00 


t i 


1898, 


1965 55 


Ipswich Town notes, 17500 00 


a 


1899. 


2032 00 


111. Cent'l R. R. 3 l-2s. 3000 00 


a 


1900, 


2138 65 


First National Bank, 4691 70 


(i 


1901, 


2363 50 




< < 


1902, 


2446 22 




tt 


1903, 


2531 84 




< i 


1904, 


2680 32 




a 


1905, 


2890 91 




i i 


1906, 


2986 47 




i < 


1907, 


3084 00 




a 


1908, 


3418 34 




i i 


1909, 


3656 61 




a 


1910, 


3671 99 




From profits 


1911, 


3784 73 




i « 


1912, 


3901 40 




« < 


1913, 


4022 17 




< < 


1914, 


4146 45 




a 


1915, 


4276 52 




« i 


1916, 


4410 42 




Interest, 




29362 50 






$95,129 18 


$95,129 18 



10 WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Water Commissioners : 

Gentlemen : Following is the report for the year ending 
December 31, 1916. 

MAIN PIPES. 
During the year the following extensions of mains have been 
laid (6 inch pipe). 

Kimball Ave. 760 feet 

The number of feet of mains laid to date and sizes are as 
follows: 

14 inch, 1,505 

12 inch. 10,963 

10 inch, 8,830 

8 inch, 17,897 

6 inch, 81,746 

4 inch, 3,708 

2 inch, 9,920 

1 inch, 2,070 

Total. 136,659=25 miles, 4659 feet. 

STREET GATES. 
Total number now set is, 157 

HYDRANTS. 

They are in good working order, the total now set is as 
follows : 

Town, 178 

Private, 15 

Total, 193 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 11 

SERVICE PIPES. 

Nineteen services have been added this year. Total number 
services connected with the works to date, 1042, 

Following is an account of the number of services added, also 
the number of feet of service pipe laid (by years) since the works 
were put in. 

Total 





No. ser- 


Town 


Private 


Year 


vices added 


Ft. In. 


Ft. 


In. 


1894 


181 


4,470 


4 


2,771 


2 


1895 


218 


5,312 


3 


6,051 


5 


1896 


110 


2,391 


9 


2,516 


5 


1897 


32 


896 


6 


1,991 


6 


1898 


42 


1,112 


7 


1,318 


3 


1899 


34 


841 


2 


1,335 


10 


1900 


30 


641 


2 


2,741 


4 


1901 


25 


517 


4 


1,209 


5 


1902 


25 


580 


1 


3,657 


2 


1903 


19 


800 


1 


1,589 


1 


1904 


17 


367 


5 


263 


2 


1905 


30 


1,172 


7 


443 


1 


1906 


22 


454 




233 


5 


1907 


49 


986 


9 


625 


8 


1908 


38 


715 


3 


464 


8 


1909 


31 


653 


5 


336 


9 


1910 


35 


765 




819 




1911 


15 


345 


5 


271 


11 


1912 


13 


328 


8 


188 


10 


1913 


16 


526 




350 




1914 


15 


262 


5 


146 


2 


1915 


25 


451 


9 


145 


10 


1916 


19 


374 


3 


254 


2 



Ft. 


In. 


7,241 


6 


11,363 


8 


5,008 


2 


2,288 




2,430 


10 


2,177 




3,382 


6 


1,726 


9 


4,237 


3 


2,389 


2 


630 


7 


1,615 


8 


687 


5 


1,612 


5 


1,179 


11 


990 


2 


1,584 




617 


4 


517 


6 


876 




408 


7 


597 


7 


628 


5 



23 1042 24,257 2 29,824 5 54,130 7 

Total, 54,130 feet=10 miles, 1380 feet. 

The service pipes are cast iron, lead and galvanized iron from 
3-4 inch to 4 inches. 



12 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



SYNOPSIS OF THE PUMPING RECORD FOR THE YEAR 
ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1916. 



1916 


Total pumping: 
time per month 


| Average num- 
Total number gallons i^ er ga i s> wa ter 
of water pumped per I p Ump ed per 
month. d a y. 


Month 


Hrs. Min. 


Gallons. 


Gallons. 


J anuary 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 


190 
195 
201 
149 
212 
193 
208 
238 
217 
212 
179 
154 


15 

45 
30 
30 
45 
30 
15 
30 
45 
30 


9,824,550 

9,928,425 
10,364,475 

7,598,100 
10,971,225 

9,979,800 
10,862,775 
12,337,425 
30,986,525 
11,105,775 

9,166,125 . 

7,879,350 


316,921 
342,359 
334,338 
253,270 
353,910 
332,660 
350,412 
399,143 
366,218 
358,251 
305,537 
254,173 


Total for year 


2353 


15 


121,040,550 




Daily average for year 






330,712 



Estimated amount of coal consumed during the year, 174 tons, 
693 pounds. 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



13 



METERS. 

Eleven meters have been added this year, the total number now 
in use is as follows : 



NAME. 


Sizes. 


Total. 




3 in, 


2 in. 


1 l-2in 1 in. 3-4 in, 5-8 in 




Crown 

Empire 

Hersey 

Lambert 

Niagara 

Nash 

Union 

Worthington 

Columbia 

Elevator 


4 


10 

1 

2 

• 


4 
1 


5 
1 
3 
3 

5 

2 


59 


47 
56 
37 
30 
15 
261 

1 
17 

2 


70 

57 

41 

35 

75 

266 

1 

19 

2 

2 




4 


13 5 19 


59 


466 


568 



14 WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 

EXTENSIONS. 

KIMBALL AVENUE. 

760 feet 6 inch pipe, 

1 six inch gate Valve and Box, 

2 six inch Sleeves, 
2 six inch Plugs, 
2 six inch elbows, 
800 pounds pig lead, 
Labor and miscellaneous, 

Average cost per foot, $1.39 



$494 00 


16 00 


5 00 


50 


20 00 


64 00 


459 25 



$1058 75 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 15 



TREASURERS STATEMENT. 

WATER DEPARTMENT, TOWN OF IPSWICH. 
WILLIAM J. RILEY, TREASURER. 

DR. 

To cash on hand January, 1916, , $929 05 

To amounts received : 

Fixture rates, $ 5441 18 

Meter rates, 8884 79 

Miscellaneous water, 305 00 

Service pipe supplies, 105 87 

Note appropriation, 1900 00 

Note issue, 5000 00 

Insurance dividend, 59 19 

Hay at Station, 27 00 

Miscellaneous, 1 00 

$22653 08 





CR. 




By paid : 






Commissioners' orders, 




$11725 82 


Notes, 




1900 00 


Interest, 




8070 00 




$21695 82 


Balance, January, 1917, 




957 26 



$22653 08 



The Treasurer has the following bills for collection : 
Fixture rates, $2200 22 

Meter rates, 3843 50 

Little Neck, 605 40 

Treadwell's Island, 74 00 

Service pipe supplies, 271 79 

$6,994 91 



16 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 





m 




70 <-j 


f' w O CO 






# a> 


i-l tH ~ ~ C3 


1 CT3 


1 ctf *^i crj ~. 






"-P 


O LO O 0> 


t- <d C- 0) r— On 








CO CM -^ 


1— 1 


J~^ f -J T— I 






3 




5o 


^OOjOOj 








^O 


'— ' O T-l O T-l 






•+J 


>— 1 T— 1 -4-> +-> +J • 










o5 


O 


rl O 


rH O Jh O JL| 






• s 


>s • C— C- O LO 

"_: C HH(M(M 


03 LO 


ajo cfiio as 






flj C\I 


a> ^ cu C^l a) 








P c3 as a- as<v3 

t-3 1-3 t— 1 r- 1 t— 1 


>>ee >,€«- >,€«- >, 






COCDOOt- CO <X> OS 












O CO CO CO ^J< LO LO LO _ 








• 




t— It-Hi— 1 rH H y— 1 r— 1 t— 1 O 








3D 




ii i OlOCO 

HHHt-OJOOOiO^OOOOiMH' _ 




O CO 




,£2 


OCOCOCO^^LOLOLOLOOti o lo 


00 


1— 1 <M 




A 

L 


s 

C ■ 


t— It— It— It— It— It— Ir-'r- It— It— It— 1 C- L— t— 1 tJ< 


so 


T— 1 T— 1 




\F 


fc 


OOtCKNOJHH^COHINHThOJlOH 


1— 1 


— ' T—l 




<H 


O CO T— 1 T— 1 













T— 1 








CD 


^Wt>C5OC0M^t-t-t-(X)OOOC0 


^ 


LO CD 




A 


C 


asaiosaioooooooor— it— i— ii— i 


T— I 


T—l T— 1 




CQ 


oo x)OOGoasasasasasasasasasasasas 


as 


as as 




1— ( 


t-HtHt— It— It— It— It— It—It— It— It— It— It— It— It— It— 1 


T— 1 


T— T—l 




A 


<4H 

o 


t-Ht-It-ItHt-|t-It-ICO(M t-I CO (:Y3 t _| t HtHt-I 










T-T 


T-T t-T 




£ 


-t-> 


.b e c i:- JS? & s> s> '+» ^ > +j +s +5 43 









< 


OS 

Q 




Q 




o> 


^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ "^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ "^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ 


rt< 


^ Tj< 






h-j 










+j 


0000000000000000 








O 


C 


OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOLO 








1 LO 


H 


£ 


oooooooooo<ooololqcvj 


LO 


<x> 


CO 












o 


OOCDtMOJHHTfOOHtMHD-^t-^ 


Tf 


as lo 


<M 





s 
< 


O CO 

— -t 






O 
CXI 
















-4-> -+-> -*-» ' 4-> 












. a . a , a .a 










. Q Q Q" .Q 


"• 


- * 
















O 
H 


ch Wat 
ch Wat 
ch Wat 

ank, Ly 
5wich 
ch Wat< 








5 


Q 


| % • 5^ E= = = = = ^S 


"• 


^ ^ 




^ 


O 


9i O <« <« m « mm 








r 


•f- . a a-rj a be M - a 










^^ M g^ ,sl H 

m •g'Bo'f S'g §§'§ 

^ fl ;£ gog * g* - -•- - wfo g 


^ 


N* ^ 








^^ w bc M U)CbJ0 5 bo 












Uj , , firrj c CO C .£ a> 2 


- 


- - 
















1 


j pq £ go <Ho r5 w fcow 









MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 



17 



ELECTRIC LIGHT DEPT. 



CON STRUCTION EXPENSES. 

The following bills have been paid for construction during the 
year 1916, and are in addition to the amounts paid to Jan. 1, 1916. 



PAID TO 


FOR WHAT 


AMOUNT 


C J Dupray, 


labor, 


$528 00 


Gordon Player, 


« « 


81 00 


Lester Wood, 


a 


2 25 


Chester Scahill, 


< < 


41 59 


Joseph King, 


it 


3 75 


Orrin Leno, 


< ( 


246 18 


Frank H Girard, 


tt 


78 61 


Wilfred Wile, 


a 


11 00 


Peter Italian, 


tt 


5 06 


Joseph Leet, 


tt 


4 50 


Henry Lavoie, 


a 


6 75 


John Ready, 


i« 


9 00 


Thomas Smith, 


it 


49 50 


Edward Norman, 


tt 


9 84 


Samuel Lavoie, 


tt 


5 06 


Wilfred Atherley, 


a 


94 50 


J N Crowe, 


ladder. 


6 00 


Geo E Daniels, 


labor and supplies, 


65 00 


Hayes Bros., 


labor and supplies, 


60 


Canney Lumber Co., 


lumber, 


3 96 


American Ex. Co., 


express, 


3 82 


Peoples Ex. Co., 


< < 


4 20 


D A Grady, 


teams, 


4 00 



18 



ELECTRIC LIGHT REPORT. 



PAID TO 



FOR WHAT 



AMOUNT 



Edison Co., 
Ipswich Mills, 
Wetmore Savage Co., 
W H Rand, 
J Merrill, 
A I Savory, 
Allen Bros., 
A D Mallard, 
J W Goodhue, 
Pettingill Andrews Co., 
C F Chapman & Son, 
B. & M. R. R. Co., 
General Electric Co., 
N.E.Tel. & Tel. Co., 
Mayer & Porter, 
Richard Davis, 
D A Grady, 



supplies, 


18 00 


n 


8 80 


<< 


138 74 


supplies and labor, 


36 64 


« < < i « < 


502 18 


supplies, 


1 50 


it 


1 00 


trucking, 


23 56 


supplies, 


24 60 


electrical supplies, 


1461 65 


«« << 


10 15 


freight, 


66 26 


electrical supplies, 


726 48 


poles, 


95 59 


labor and supplies, 


300 12 


(t it a 


94 65 


a a tt 


67 15 



Total, 



$4841 24 



ELECTRIC LIGHT REPORT. 



19 



DR. 



CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT, 1916. 



CR. 



To balance 1915, 

To depreciation appro. 

To sale of note, 



$1567 33 
2040 00 
2000 00 

$5,607 33 



By bills paid 1916, 
By balance on hand, 



$4841 24 
766 09 



$5,607 33 



COST OF CONSTRUCTION. 



Cost of Real Estate, 
Cost of Steam Plant, 
Cost of Electric Lines, 
Cost of Electric Plant, 



Dec. 31, 1915 


$ 8117 


19 


16431 


18 


63622 


17 


9981 


90 



$y8,152 44 



Year 1916 


Total 


$4841 24 


$ 8117 19 

16431 18 

68463 41 

9981 90 


$4,841 24 


$102,993 68 



NOTES AND INTEREST. 



Interest paid 1916 by treasurer, 
Notes " " " 





$2492 00 


from appropriation, 


1250 00 


" earnings, 


2000 00 



DR. 



NOTE INDEBTEDNESS. 



CR. 



To outstanding notes 

Jan, 1, 1916, $61550 00 

To note authorized 

in 1916 2000 00 



$63,550 00 



By notes paid 1916, $ 
By bal, outstanding 
Jan. 1, 1917, 



3250 00 
60300 00 

$63,550 00 




20 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 



MANAGERS REPORT. 



To the Water and Municipal Lighting Commission. 
Gentlemen ; 
I submit the following report of the receipts and expenses of 
the Lighting Plant for the year 1916. 

MAINTENANCE. 



PAID TO 



FOR WHAT 



AMOUNT 



Edmund Russell, 
Wm D Dame, 
Edw B Perry, 
Geo L Fall, 
Enoch Olmstead, 
Ralph B Pickard, 
Fred C Rust, 
Wm P Edgerly, 
Chester Patch, 
L D Nourse, 
Geo E Brown, 
J F Roberts, 
Clarence J Dupray, 
Gordon Player, 
Wilfred Atherley, 
Orrin Leno, 



LABOR. 

engineer, 



fireman, 



engineer, 



electrician, 



$1248 00 
381 50 
136 50 
955 23 
840 04 
840 37 
840 03 
269 70 
472 50 
213 50 
680 75 
689 50 
465 25 
108 00 
66 38- 
174 47 



Total, 


FUEL. 


$8,381 72 


The Skeele Coal Co., 


coal, 


$2555 64 


N. E. Coal & Coke Co., 


<< 


325 81 


Ipswich Mills, 


(• 


147 19 


B&MRRCo., 


freight on coal, 


4211 01 


Edmund Wile, 


teaming coal, 


409 80 


Rees Jenkins, 


a << 


268 32 



Total, 



$7,917 77 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 



21 



PAID TO 



FOR WHAT 



AMOUNT 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



J H Lakeman, 


stamped envelopes, 


$ 63 90 


U S Fidelity, 


insurance, 


68 00 


A G Osborne, 


oil and waste, 


566 96 


C S Tyler, 


supplies, 


9 09 


Frank H Girard, 


labor, 


88 59 


Thos Smith, 


«< 


37 11 


Ipswich Chronicle. 


printing, 


78 50 


N E Tel & Tel Co., 


telephone, 


30 55 


G A Barker, 


insurance, 


891 23 


A D Mallard, 


trucking, 


8 87 


C F Chapman & Son, 


supplies, 


7 65 


General Electric Co., 


supplies, 


11 80 


Chester W Bamford, 


salary, 


91 66 


William J Riley, 


salary, 


158 34 


G W-Knowlton Rubber Co., 


supplies, 


13 87 


Miley Soap Co., 


soap, 


17 50 


American Express Co., 


express, 


12 95 


Howard Clock Co,, 


supplies, 


10 00 


John Ready, 


labor, 


4 50 


Geo A Schofield, 


commissioner, 


100 00 


Geo H W Hayes, 


tt 


100 00 


William H Rand, 


a 


100 00 


Annie Atherley, 


bookkeeper, 


130 00 


Geo A Schofield, 


manager and clerk, 


400 00 


A C Damon, 


supplies, 


14 25 


Hayes & Schofield, 


Oliver Typewriter, 


15 00 


Edw Bailey, 


, supplies, 


15 


H K Barnes, 


repair belts, 


23 48 


Geo A Schofield, 


cash paid out, 


10 85 


Hobbs Warren Co., 


books, 


4 33 


G G Dexter, 


photograph, 


12 50 


Bert Sheppard, 


labor, 


2 53 


Chester Scahill, 


< < 


36 27 


Mass. Lighting Asso., 


annual dues, 


10 00 


John W Goodhue, 


supplies, 


11 13 


Geo E Marsh & Co,, 


« < 


4 25 


J A Huckins, 


labor, 


34 00 


General Electric Co., 


supplies, 


58 59 


A M Clarke, 


typewriting, t 


4 40 



22 



ELECTRIC LIGHT REPORT. 



PAID TO 


FOR WHAT 


AMOUNT 


Hayes Bros,, 


supplies, 


35 


E E Currier. 


<< 


89 08 


Walter Henderson, 


« « 


29 90 


Wetmore Savage Co., 


(< 


23 70 


C J Dupray. 


cash paid out, 


5 50 


J W McGuire, 


repairs and supplies, 


226 70 


C C Caldwell, 


supplies, 


69 52 


Cotton & Woolen Ins. Co., 


insurance, 


100 00 


Total, 


$3787 55 


DR. MAINTENANCE, 1916. 


CR. 


To bal. Jan. !, 1916, $8248 12 By bills paid 1916, 


$20087 04 


To cash sale of light, 17073 26 \ Less old bills due 




To cash sale of power, 2000 00 | Jan. 1, 1916, 


1742 20 


To Ins. dividend, 135 


00 Bv bal. in favor Dept. 




To miscellaneous", 151 


22 1 to Jan. 1, 1917, 


8129 63 


To amt. due for light, 2166 27 






To amt. due rent poles, 185 


00 






$29,958 87 


$29,958 87 


JOBBING DEPARTMENT. 


PAID TO 


FOR WHAT 


AMOUNT 


Simplex Electric Heating Co 


supplies, . 


$ 47 94 


Pettingell-Andrews Co 


« c 


228 58 


Peoples Express Co 


express 


2 75 


General Electric Co 


supplies 


138 38 


C J Dupray 


labor 


21 00 


Orrin Leno 


< < 


13 50 


Total, 


$452 15 


DR. JOBBING 


DEPARTMENT. 


CR. 


To bal. profits to 




By bills paid 1916, 


$ 452 15 


Jan. 1, 1916, $3431 83 


By old bills due 




To cash for labor and 




Jan. 1, 1916, 


227 50 


material, 387 


54 


Bv bal. in favor Dept. 




To bills due, 236 


28 


Jan. 1, 1917, 


3376 00 


$4,055 65 


$4,055 65 



ELECTRIC LIGHT REPORT. 23 



TREASURER'S STATEMENT. 

ELECTRIC LIGHT DEPARTMENT, TOWN OF IPSWICH. 
WILLIAM J. RILEY, TREASURER. 



DR. 




To cash on hand, January 1916, 


$4,939 18 


To amounts received : 




Commercial light, 


$16458 29 


Town buildings, 


614 97 


Jobbing, 


387 54 


Power, 


2000 00 


Insurance dividend, 


135 00 


Miscellaneous, 


151 22 


Depreciation appropriation, 


2040 00 


Note appropriation, 


1250 00 


Interest appropriation, 


2484 00 


Note issue. 


2000 00 




$32,460 20 


CR. 




By paid : 


• 


Commissioners' orders, 


$25380 43 


Notes. 


3250 00 


Interest, 


2492 00 




$31122 43 


Balance, January 1917, 


1337 77 




$32,460 20 



The Treasurer has the following bills for collection : 
Commercial light, $2166 27 

Jobbing, 236 28 

Miscellaneous, 185 00 

$2,587 55 



24 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 






V Z) SJ o 

fl fl fl fl 



o o 



Sh t-< U Sh Jh *h 

C! C C fl 



o3 o3 c3 o3 
<D CD CD 0) 



COOOr-iOJHlOOi-iOOLCit-'^cOC'* 
(NIC^ICO»-H(MC<1C<1COCOCOCOCOC\1COCO 
<75<JiOiC50iC5CiOiiJ50iOiaiOi(J3C5000000 

»— ' t— lr- (i— I i— It— Ir- I — t— It— It— iHHr- 1 • — OOOOOO 

-<iN(NH(N(MCgcOCO(XlMMH(N^OOOOOO 

a^aiaiaidcjiaiasaio'iascsaicrs:?'}'— ihh — > *— i t— i 

— H t-H t— I i— I i— IHHr- It-Ht— I r- It— It-Hi— It— I 1^5- €^- €^- g/5- 68- <V9- 



• 



so 
<D 
+-> 
O 

d 



wtccotoMwtfltDnitQtoiaaiaia! 
cdcdcdcdcdcdcdcdcdcddcdcdcdcdcdcdcdcdcdcd 

ooocooooooooooooooooc 

O(M£0C0(M^^(M0qcqiMTjt>t>00HHHHHH 





H 
W 

H 
M 

H 


B 
H 



CD 

CO 

I— I 

*4H 

o 

a» 
+-> 

cS 

Q 



C0WP0M'^'^iOCriI>0005COOO(MC0C0^iOO 

OOC'OOOOOOOOi— ItHt— It— It-Ht— It— It— It— It— I 



„lO HO IC 



„Ld^ o lo o 



r- TCi O O O O O 

: co (M co co ^ oo co 



a) a> cd 
C S c 



CD CD 



0)0) Q),C0 CDi-ti-jr-jr-iOOCDr-tr-ii-ir-if-ir-i 






^^ "^* ^^ "^< ^< "*^ ^^ ""^ "^^ ^^ ^* "^^ *^* "^^ ^^ ^v}^ "^^ ^^ "^^ ""n^ T^T 



-4J 

g 

G 

o 



ooooooooooooooooooo oo 
ooooooooooooooooooooo 

OOOOOOOOOOOO10WIOCDD-00 0005O 



OOOCOCOC<lrJ<^C\lC<lC<l(M(MCOCO^ 

OS- 



CM 



I o 
1 o 

CO 

o 

<cO 



PQ 

Q 

►J 



a 

CD 

Q 

0) 



a 

CD 

Q 

0> 



03 
'l*..r 



a 

CD 

Q 

CD 



^ j^ c 



.2 03 

£P3 

CO 



G G "-< G 
o3 o3 ^ o3 

pqcq copq 

CO COM CQm 

^G'G.CtS 

'►^ *rr -G b» G 

03 5**0^ 

wm^Ji^ g 

« QJ C CD C m 

CO rj-( •!— rr-( •!— .f— CD 



CO 

■+J 

CD 
CO 

&■= 

*-, CO 

5 c3 



rG 

o 

•f— I *N 

w 5 

a o3 

co 



a 

CD 

.Q 



. a 

CD 

Q 



, a 

CD 

Q 



a 
cd: 

Q 



' CD 
03 



,G 02 

O T3 

fa 

r— I -H-> 
CO 

G H 
fa >> 



s g 

r* 03 



?-i G ?-i 

CD C CD 

03 ,_] o3 

O o3 o-s cj 

£P3 ^^ ^^ ^. 

co co cc PQ co cd to 

a be a r . ate a 

—I ^^ k_ 



u 

CD 

-m ; 
o 






y g G M J3 03 1= . J3 
.^ C C*0) bCnG bfl CD bfl 



03 

-<H> 

o 

H 



be CD 



^ o3 G o3 C O 



03 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 25 



MANAGER'S REPORT. 

The following table will show the income receipts and the 
outgo payment of the Department for the year ending December 
31, 1915, as they apply to the method of ascertaining the cost of 
street lighting for the year, 

EXPENDED. 
Maintenance, bills paid, 
Interest on debt paid, 
Depreciation appropriation, 
Total, 

RECEIVED. 
Sale of light and power, 
Miscellaneous receipts, 
Due rent of poles, 
Increase in Jobbing, inventory, 
Total, 

$4,432 49 

This excess of expenditures over earnings represents the 
amount which by the State law is charged against street lighting, 
and includes, as will be noticed, both the interest and depreciation 
appropriations of the Town which together are larger than the 
balance. This balance divided among the street lights gives the 
following cost of each street light for the year 1916. 

790 lamps each burning 40 watts, one year, $ 4 78 each 
19 " " " 250 " " " 36 92 each 

While the above figures show a very low price as compared 
with the prices charged for similar service in most other places, as 
I have repeatedly shown in previous reports, there has been quite a 
substantial increase this year over last, when the price was at the 



$20087 04 
2492 00 
2040 00 


$19497 33 
286 22 
185 00 
218 00 

<P°0 19fi ^ 


«p^U,±ou oo 



26 MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 



very low figure of $2.62 for every 40 watt lamp. This increase is 
due to two causes, first, we have reduced the price for commercial 
electricity from twelve cents per K. W. hour with 10% discount to 
eleven cents per K, W, hour with one cent per hour discount. Under 
the old price the net rate was ten and eight-tenths cents. This re- 
duction then was equal to 8-10 of one cent each hour, and on the 
sales of light for the last year, which amounted to $17,497,48, this 
saving to our customers was approximately $1,400.00. In other 
words we gave our customers collectively $1,400.00 by the reduction 
in price. This of course reduced our earnings the same amount 
and this i eduction helped increase the cost of each street lamp over 
what it would have cost if we had continued to charge the higher 
price to private customers. It is my opinion, and I am pleased to 
state, the opinion of all of the members of the Commission that 
reductions to the consumers should be made, for we believe it to be 
unfair to continue to charge such persons as may use electricity for 
lighting, a price large enough to make our profits pay for street 
lighting. If everyone used electricity that might be proper but all 
of our people do not use electricity and there does not seem to me 
to be any sound reason for making part of the people pay for light- 
ing the streets for the benefit of all the people. The fact that our 
street lights cost us so little as compared with what private com- 
panies charge for similar service supports this contention, and I 
unhesitatingly recommend still further reductions in the price for 
commercial lighting, to the end that we may make it possible for 
all of our people to use electricity for lighting purposes. 

Another factor which helped increase our expenses this year 
was the increased cost of about everything which we were obliged 
to purchase. This was particularly true about coal, and on this 
item alone our increased expense was about $1,579.00 over last year 
for approximately the same quantity of coal, 

I am pleased to report, however, that in spiie of the loss of 
income on account of reduced price for what we sell and the in- 
creased expenses for what we purchased, that we have had a 
wonderfully successful year and that the coming year promises 
even greater success. An arrangement covering a period of years 
has been made with Mr. Charles G. Rice, and we are now lighting 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT, 27 



his large estate on the Topsfield Road, and in a short time we will 
be supplying him with electricity for power purposes. The terms 
of the agreement are alike fair and just to Mr. Rice and to the 
Town, and the power load, coming in the daytime, will be especially 
appreciated as it does not necessitate any increase at the station. 

The following table shows the increase in the number of 
services and also the amount of sales each year since the start. 

Sale of Current 
Year No. Services and Power 

1904 69 $ 3605 53 

19C5 105 7076 77 

1906 131 8330 68 

1907 170 7462 43 

1908 195 9010 34 

1909 218 9178 64 

1910 269 10594 48 

1911 323 12159 42 

1912 362 14557 45 

1913 435 16131 80 
1614 477 17380 33 

1915 521 19559 41 

1916 591 19497 04 

Those who have watched the growth and success of the Elec- 
tric Lighting Department for the past thirteen years, as shown by 
the various reports must, I believe, be convinced that it is possible 
for a community like Ipswich to own and operate its own plant with 
benefit not only to the Town in its corporate capacity but also with 
distinct benefit to the individuals who use the current for private 
purposes. It is quite true that we have gone ahead conservatively 
and carefully, and it is also true that perhaps a private concern 
might have taken more chances and perhaps had more success, if by 
success we mean the making of profits from the consumers. I have 
always taken the ground that the purpose of a Municipal Plant is 
not, and should not, be the making of profits, and I have also be- 
lieve that "care" and not "rush" should be the watchword in ex- 
pending the taxpayers money. A slow, steady growth is better 
than speculation with the possibilities not only for success, but for 
failure as well. To give the people the lowest possible price and at 
the same time to do justice to the taxpayers as a whole has been 



28 MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 

my purpose and I am pleased to state that both my colleagues, Geo. 
H. W, Hayes and William H. Rand have at all times not only backed 
up my position but have each of them given of their best efforts to 
bring" success along these lines. We have been fortunate in the fact 
that for the entire thirteen years during which the plant has been 
in operation, the citizens have unfailingly given us their support. 
Year after year, no matter how strongly the political fight has 
waged around the other Town officials, our board has been undis- 
turbed in its membership. I have repeatedly pointed out that a 
business proposition should not be made a political proposition nor 
should the management of such a business be determined on a polit- 
cal basis. Being a believer in the principle of Municipal Ownership, 
I sought the chance fourteen years ago to try it out. I believe I can 
truthfully say that it has proven to be a success, I can truthfully 
add that the true reason why it has been a success is that Ipswich 
citizens have been wise enough to keep politics out of this depart- 
ment. I believe that it is the part of wisdom to continue to "keep 
politics out'' and I also have faith that our citizens will continue to 
recognize that fact as they have recognized it for the past thirteen 
years. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE A. SCHOFIELD, Manager. 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 29 



COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 

To the citizens of Ipswich, 
Gentlemen: — 
The Water and Municipal Lighting Commissioners submit 
their annual report for the year ending December 31, 1916. 

WATER DEPARTMENT. 

On pages four to sixteen inclusive will be found a detailed 
account of the receipts and expenditures of the department for the 
year 1916. 

The only extension of the main pipe made this year was on 
Kimball Avenue where the main has been extended from Linebrook 
Road 760 feet to the house of William Maden. As soon as the 
frost is out the extension will be carried through Kimball Avenue 
to High Street. 

We anticipated being called on to make an extension on 
Argilla Road but the residents along that road did not complete 
their plans for the necessary guarantee and the matter will proba- 
bly come up again this year. 

The expenditures for the year 1917 are estimated to be as 
follows: 



30 MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 

For Interest Payment $8089 00 

" Sinking Fund Payment 4549 00 

" General Expenses 4500 00 



$17,138 00 



We feel that the receipts of the department will be sufficient 
to pay this amount and we do not ask for any appropriation from 
the town. We call your attention to the excellent financial show- 
ing made by this department and to the fact that the town is 
getting its hydrant service free of expense. Not only is this true 
but this department has actually paid from its earnings during the 
past six years $24541.69 into the sinking fund to help pay the bonds 
when they are due. Your attention is also directed to the report 
of the Sinking Fund on page nine. It is in a strong and 
healthy condition and has now reached close to the $100,000 mark. 



ELECTRIC LIGHT DEPARTMENT. 

Pages seventeen to twenty-four inclusive of this report give a 
full account of the receipts and disbursements of this department 
as submitted by the manager. We take what we believe is a just 
pride in the showing of this department as well as in the water 
department. 

Acting after a careful investigation and along what we 
believe to be the lines of justice and equity we have decided to 
make a further reduction in the price of electricity for commercial 
lighting and we have established as the price, dating from Feb. 1st 
1917, ten cents per K. W. hour for commercial light with a dis- 
count of one cent per hour on all bills paid on or before the 20th 
day of the month. This gives a net price of 9 cents per K. W. hour 
to all who desire to take advantage of the discount and make a 
total reduction from the original price, of 6 cents per K. W. Hour. 
We believe that it would be unjust to put the burden of paying 
for lighting the streets as the duty of the people who use electricity 
when all of the people share in the benefits. 

During the past year, parties connected with a Newburyport 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 31 

Electric Co., have been interested in the question of supplying a 
very large amount of electricity to the Ipswich Mills, the plan 
being to have that company substitute electricity for steam power. 
They have also taken up the question of supplying the Town with 
electric current, not with the idea of having the town give up the 
plan of managing its own lighting system, but to have the town 
purchase its electric current, instead of generating it at our station. 
Their claim is, that they are putting in a very large electric plant, 
and that they can sell electricity to the town at wholesale cheaper 
than the town can generate it at a small station. 

While we feel that it is our duty to carefully consider this or 
any other proposition which might possibly be of advantage to the 
Town, we do not feel that a hasty decision should be made. It is a 
question which should be carefully studied from every possible 
angle. We have had thirteen years of extraordinary success under 
the present plan, and we are today in a better condition to continue 
the work than at any time during those thirteen years. We have 
gradually grown, adding man after man to our station, as the busi- 
ne ss warranted it, until today we have reached the limit and our 
expense account so far as station labor is concerned, is now practi- 
cally fixed. New business in the future means increased profits. 
We have a well established system, adapted to the needs of our 
people, and a substantial annual income, and we should hesitate be- 
fore taking any step which will change these conditions, unless it is 
clearly and positively shown that such change will not only be to 
the advantage of the people, but that such advantage shall be per- 
manent. 

Your commissioners are giving this question careful consid- 
eration, and, if definite plans and prices are presented to us, we 
will lay the whole matter before the voters at a Town meeting for 
their consideration and decision. 

The following amounts are called for by this department for 
1917. Depreciation $2450. Interest $2400. Note Payment $3350. 

We extend to the voters and to the employees of our depart- 
ment our sincere thanks for their kindness and co-operation in help- 
ing make our work successful, and we trust that our management 



32 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 



of these two important business departments has merited and will 



receive the approval of the citizens of Ipswich. 
Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE A. SCHOFIELD, 
GEORGE H. W. HAYES, 
WILLIAM H. RAND, 
Ipswich, January, 1917. 



Water and 

Municipal Light 

Commissioners. 



AUDITOR'S STATEMENT. 

I have examined the books and accounts of the Water and 
Electric Light Department, and of the Treasurer of the Sinking 
Fund and find them correct. 

ARTHUR H. WALTON, Auditor. 
Ipswich, February 19, 1917. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 




FOR THE YEAR 1916. 



CHARLES G. HULL, PRINTER. 
8 COGSWELL STREET. IPSWICH, MASS. 
1917. 



ORGANIZATION OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



Chairman — Herbert W. Mason. 

Secretary and Purchasing Agent — Howard N. Doughty. 

Finance and Budget — H. W. Mason, W. J. Riley. 

Text-Books and Teachers— H. W. Mason, Dr. G. E. MacArthur. 

Buildings and Grounds — Luther Wait, Joseph W. Ross. 

Improvements and Insurance — Luther Wait, Joseph W. Ross. 

School Physician — Dr. G. E. MacArthur. 



Attendance Officer — George W. Tozer. 



Superintendent — Joseph I. Horton. 
Office Hours — School Days, from 3:30 to 5:30. 
Manning School Building. 



EDUCATION. 



General Expenses. 

Frederic B. Knight, superintendent $1227 72 

Joseph I. Horton, " 680 00 

Mary Otis Quinn, clerk 3 1 3 00 

J. P. Marston, cash paid out 7 1 1 

Ipswich Chronicle, printing 79 80 

The Gale-Sawyer Co., supplies 1 90 

Charles G. Hull, printing reports 131 00 

Boston Index Card Co., supplies 1 75 

J. H. Lakeman, postmaster, postage 46 93 

U. S. Mailing Case Co., supplies 2 08 

Leslie Millard, typewriting 75 

C. J. Peters & Son Co., engraving 2 28 
G. A.. Henneberry, supplies 1 6 35 
H. N. Doughty, cash paid out 16 54 
New England T. & T. Co., telephone 72 68 

1915 4 51 

F. B. Knight, carfares and expenses 29 27 

D. A. Grady, teams 8 50 
George Tibbetts, team 1 50 
Charles W. Barton, boat 2 00 
S. S. Bayley, " 4 50 
James M. Burke, expense 58 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



James Everlyn, interpreter 
Morris Sushelsky, 

D. A. Grady, team 

Dr. George E. MacArthur, school physician 
Wm. B. Plummer, fire protection report 
Dorothy Rand, cash paid cut 
F. B. Knight, " " " 

American Express Co., express 

" " " 1915 

F. W. Barry, Beale & Co., supplies 
Neostyle Co., 
A. D. Mallard, trucking 
Rumford Supply Co., supplies 
Brown-Howland Co., 

E. F. Southwick, lunch 
H. B. McArdle, supplies 
People's Express, Inc., express 

F. B. Mitchell, engraving 
Joseph Adleman, trucking 

The General Fireproofmg Co., supplies 

Joseph I. Horton, cash paid out 

A. D. Mallard, trucking 

Boston Index Card Co., supplies 



4 


24 


4 24 


6 


50 


212 


50 


10 


00 


7 


42 


4 


40 


5 


50 


2 


68 


21 


01 


7 


35 


24 42 


4 


09 


39 


96 




75 


2 


00 




65 


15 


00 


2 


50 


11 


07 


3 


54 


6 64 


3 


77 



$3050 98 



Teachers' Salaries. 



John P. Marston 
Emma G. Gardner 
Dorothy Rand 
Amy B. Lindsey 



$940 00 
480 00 
312 50 
719 00 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Mildred Emerson 

Charles A. Goodwin 

Gladys MacLay 

Dorothy Richardson 

Marion Farrar 

Dorothea Whitney 

Gwendolyn Taggart 

Mary A. Preble 

Adele Mathey 

Cora Jewett 

Lucy A. Kimball 

Ellinore Soutter 

W. W. Lunt 

Elizabeth Nutter 

Arthur H. Tozer 

Franklin B. Mitchell 

S. Isabel Arthur 

Bertha I. Porter 

Alice Maguire 

Katherine F. Sullivan 

Nellie T. Sullivan 

Ruth Carens 

Lydia S. Harris 

Augusta N. Appleton 

Martina E. O'Neil 

Winifred M. Fleming 

Anna R. Hartford 297 00 

Eva A Willcomb 535 00 

Elsie C Green 535 00 

Annie P. Wade 535 00 

Kathleen Broderick 535 00 

Carrie Bowman 535 00 

Hilda M. Schofield 356 25 



760 


50 


910 


00 


580 


00 


300 


00 


312 


50 


390 


00 


280 


00 


200 


00 


240 


00 


304 


00 


560 


00 


300 


00 


1200 


00 


620 


00 


500 


00 


972 


75 


724 


00 


390 


00 


535 


00 


724 00 


582 


20 


351 


50 


535 


00 


464 


50 


535 


00 


535 


00 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Esther L. Tenney 

Ralph W. Westcott 

Walter R. Brooks 

Claudia McDuff 

Mrs. John P. Marston 

Agnes Eberling 

Edna Pinkest 

Eva Russell 

M. Evelyn Turner 

Leslie Millard 

Mrs. Fred Ross 

Vera Ross 

Kate Baker 

Caroline Mays 

Maxwell Lakeman 

Herbert W. Pickup 

Gertrude Sheppard 

Francis G. Ross 

Marjorie Stone 

Ethel Sanford 

Grace Moulton 

Alice K. Dinneen 

Elizabeth Stolba 

Grace Higgins 

Hazel M. Weare 

William Murphy 

Tucker Teacher's Agency 

Susie Bowen 



420 


00 


1186 49 


280 


00 


295 


00 


15 


00 


10 


00 


60 


50 


11 


00 


5 


00 


92 


50 


10 


00 


12 


50 


4 


00 


4 


00 


8 


75 


460 


00 


8 


00 


27 


00 


1 


25 


6 


00 


200 


00 


200 


00 


231 


00 


183 


75 


157 


50 


170 


00 


25 


00 


16 


00 




$23685 94 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Text Books and Supplies. 

S. A. Courtis $ 

Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 

The Macmillan Co. 

Scott, Foresman & Co. 

Jnirvey Associates, Inc. 

Edward E. Babb & Co. 



915 



D. C. Heath & Co. 
<< «« 

Ginn & Co. 

Oliver Ditson & Co. 



1915 



915 



The Outlook Co. 

Little, Brown & Co. 

Milton, Bradley Co. 

Park Publishing Co. 

C. E. Doner 

A. J. Nystrom 

American Book Co. 

Eleanor K. Peterson 

John J. IVJahoney 

Bruce Publishing Co. 

Allyn & Bacon 

L. E. Knott Apparatus Co. 

Silver, Burdett & Co. 

Neostyle Co. 

J. L. Hammatt Co. 

The Prang Co. 

Wadsworth, Howland Co. 

A. J. Wilkinson 

J. A. Blake 



1 


55 


36 


18 


159 


56 


1 


96 


. 3 


00 


1269 


47 


39 


95 


14 91 


58 


75 


87 


81 


22 


28 


6 


39 


1 


80 


10 


40 


8 


21 


1 


80 


5 


00 


3 


20 


29 


13 


5 


00 


7 


50 


1 


50 


49 


92 


43 


39 


12 


35 


5 


38 


26 


14 


12 


52 


24 


46 


6 


35 


1 


83 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



J.A.Blake, 1915 5 46 

A. I. Savory 

John W. Goodhue 

Canney Lumber Co. 

Boston & Maine R. R. 

American Rattan & Reed Co. 

Chandler & Barber Co. 



New England Reed Co. 
Wm. H. Field Co. 
Frederick A. Cheney 
Karl Andren Co. 
Palmer & Parker Cc. 
J. F. Pope & Son 
Albert Griffiths Saw Co. 
Ipswich Mills 
George H. Lord 
T. H. Woodworth 
Farley, Harvey & Co. 
Hiller & Co. 

« 1915 
N. J. Bolles 

1915 
J. J. Merrill 
Mitchell & Co. 
Measures Co., Inc. 
Titcomb & Co. 
E. E. Gray Co. 
American Express Co. 

" 1915 
People's Express Co., Inc. 
Royal Typewriter Co. 
W.N. Prescott, 1915 
Hobbs & Warren 



13 


73 


161 


13 


239 


30 


5 


97 


9 


40 


61 


62 


4 


70 


204 


23 


190 


00 


154 


10 


10 


60 


11 


82 


14 


94 


50 


90 


1 


20 


3 


90 


23 


21 


9 


64 


3 


55 


69 


00 


8 


48 


6 


27 


8 


96 


3 


82 




74 




80 


11 


28 


2 


68 


1 


85 


200 


00 


28 


95 


6 


12 



10 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



C. S. Tyler 

H. B. McArdle 

Central Scientific Co. 

Eastern Talking Machine Co. 

Stuart, Howland Co. 

Underwood Typewriter Co. 

C. W. Thompson & Co. 

Measures Co., Inc. 

A. H. Goodwin 

Oliver Ditson & Co. 

Boston Music Co. 

C. F. Chapman & Co. 

A. D. Mallard 

F. W. Barry, Beale & Co. 

Neostyle Co. 

A. J. Nystrom & Co. 

Partridge & Co. 



Transportation. 



Wm. H. Fessenden 

D. A. Grady 

Bay State St. Ry. Co. 

W. K. Chapman 



1915 



3 


50 


16 


69 


120 


72 


2 


50 


26 22 


412 


50 


30 


35 


2 


22 


3 


30 


7 


93 


2 


77 


1 


00 


3 


44 


1 


33 


5 


39 


6 


32 


1 


59 



$4133 8 



360 


00 


907 


00 


559 00 


41 


00 


71 


00 



$1938 0( 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



11 



Janitor Service. 



Wm. H. Goditt 
George W. Tozer 
F. B. Saunders 
J. J. Ryan 

1915 
Mrs. M. Ryan 
George Haskell 
Smith E. Hayes 
Thomas A. Howe 
Horace Barker 
Cora Jewett 
H. S. Bowen, Jr. 
Mrs. Thomas Whitehead 



$651 


75 


627 


62 


312 


00 


19 


00 


12 


50 


25 


00 


75 


45 


32 


00 


182 


68 


41 


61 


18 


00 




90 


3 


50 



$2002 



Fuel and Light. 



Charles L. Lovell 

1915 

Lathrop Bros. 
George Fall 
D. S. Perley 
James Small 
Electric Light Dept. 
Ipswich Gas Light Co. 



$ 730 


21 


12 


00 


1866 92 


517 49 


5 


00 


2 


00 


105 


77 


99 


20 



$3338 59 



12 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Buildings and Grounds. 

Bridgeport Wood Finishing Co., supplies $ 

A. H. Walton, painting 

Justin E. Hull, supplies 

Dustbane Mfg. Co. 

Wm. A. Mitchell, cleaning vaults 

J. J. Merrill, labor -wiring 

Charles L. Lovell, cement 

H. W. Phillips, supplies 

George Tibbetts, teaming 

1915 

George G. Dexter, frames, 1915 

George B. Robbins Disinfectant Co., 

Susan M. Harris, sand 

Water Dept, water 

John W. Goodhue 

George Hills, painting 

George Hayes, supplies 

Hayes Bros., plumbing 

Wm. H. Rand. " 

Canney Lumber Co., lumber 

L. E. Willcomb, supplies 

C. F. Chapman Co., supplies 

Cleghorn Co., 

A. I. Savory, 

Electric Light Dept, 

C. W. Corey, 

Ipswich Mills, 

C. H. Brooks, plumbing 

L. A. Fewkes, repairs 

Chandler & Farquhar Co., supplies 

H. & L. Chase, 



4 


21 


53 


81 


12 


00 


18 


00 


68 


00 


264 29 


29 


00 


137 


80 


35 


50 


4 


75 


1 


00 


104 


55 


1 


05 


225 


57 


388 


45 


10 


84 




50 


189 


89 


93 


76 


116 


37 




45 


54 


13 


6 


39 


13 


32 


61 


68 


24 


06 




50 


7 95 


2 


50 


2 


03 


2 


38 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



F. R. Schaller, piano tuning 

J. A. King, repairs 

Wm. H. Goditt, carpentry 

Lathrop Bros., te 

A. G. Lauer, 

George H. Brocklebank, masonry 

N. Duval, labor 

Edmund Wile, grading 

M. H. Chapman, painting flag pole 

Ipswich Gas Light Co., supplies 

C. S. Tyler, supplies 

N. J. Bolles 

J. R. Small, labor 

A. j. Brennan, supplies 

R. L. Purinton, plumbing 

Dana A. Dow, services 

Rees Jenkins, grading 

E. J. M. Scab ill, -fumigation 

George Haskell, 

George A. Whipple, labor 

Austin L. Lord. 



6 


00 


3 


50 


49 


50 


13 


03 


1 


00 


62 


50 


18 


06 


32 


35 




00 




50 


1 


91 


4 


47 


1 


00 


£* 


63 


6 


00 


62 




>49 


73 


6 


00 


15 


00 


5 


00 


8 


46 




$3013 66 



Furniture and Furnishings. 

Standard Elec. Time Co., clock and supplies 
Edward E. Babb & Co., desks 
A. C. Damon, furnishings 

1915 
H. J. Harwood's Sons, desks 
Clarence Cheever, clock repairs 



$221 


70 


87 


95 


105 


11 


13 


45 


325 


00 


10 


50 



14 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Rent. 

C F. Chapman $10 00 

H. W. Phillips 5 00 



$15 00 



Diplomas and Graduation Exercises. 

Nason's Orchestra, music $16 50 

F. W. Martin Co., diplomas 59 05 

First Department Store Co., ribbon 3 64 

C. S. Tyler, ribbon 2 75 

Hiller&Co., " 1 35 

Ipswich Chronicle, printing 49 00 



Insurance. 



$132 29 



G. A. Barker $989 60 

Cogswell & Safford 1 34 00 



$1123 60 



Other Expenses. 

Maynard C. Jewett, coach and expenses $58 40 

Leslie Millard, " " " 58 26 

William Read & Sons, athletic supplies 1 00 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



15 



Mass. High School Athletic Asso., membership 

Salem Rubber Co., .supplies 

Measures Co., Inc., 

Albert Elwell, 

H. H. Roper, 

William G. Horton, 

Albert F. Welsh, legal services 

Roland Jean, labor 



Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



2 


00 






4 


37 






11 


00 






14 


50 






18 


00 






5 


98 






5 


00 






3 


00 


190 






$ 


51 




43388 


76 






5 


84 




43394 60 



Appropriation $42274 00 

Appropriation, unpaid 1915 bills 369 14 

Appropriation, balances of building committee 577 96 
Burley School Fund 150 00 

Refunds 23 50 



$43394 60 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



EVENING SCHOOL. 



Teachers' Salaries. 

Bertha I. Porter $26 00 

Claudia McDuff 2 00 

Katherine F. Sullivan 38 00 

Alice Maguire 28 00 

Dorothy Rand 2 00 

Chalres A. Goodwin 25 00 

lie Millard 43 50 

Amy B. Lindsey 28 80 

Walter R. Brooks 24 00 

Franklin B. Mitchell 28 00 

Ralph W. Westcott 48 26 

Mrs. J. P. Marston 8 00 

Everett Parks 42 00 

Eldredge Grover 1 2 00 

Ellinore Soutter 2 00 

S. Isabel Arthur 1 3 00 

Nellie T. Sullivan 29 00 

Mildred Emerson 13 35 

Lillian Logan 28 00 

Mary S. Endicott 2 00 

Elliot Tozer 23 00 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 17 



Charles E. Goodhue, Jr. 1 00 

Gwendolyn Taggart 4 00 



$479 9 



Janitor Service. 

George W. Tozer $27 00 

William H. Goditt 1 8 00 



$45 00 



Other Expenses. 

Electric Light Dept., light $15 62 

Ipswich Chronicle, printing 2 50 



$18 12 



Total expenditures $543 03 

Balance from 1915 $543 03 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



January 24th, 1917. 
To the Citizens of the Town of Ipswich: — 

The School Committee 
in presenting its annual report of the condition and progress of 
our schools, points with no small degree of pride to the comple- 
tion of our school plant. With but two exceptions, which may 
be easily removed during the current year, we have a thorough- 
ly up-to-date system of school buildings of ample capacity, with 
appointments and conveniences of the most modern type. Of 
course it is to be understood that improvements could be made 
along some particular lines. In some cases we could suggest 

changes were we to start with new buildings; but on the whole, 
and considering that we had to deal with a remodelling propo- 
sition, our town is well furnished with school accommodations 
that are satisfactory in nearly every respect, and well adapted 
to our needs, both present and prospective. 

In this respect ours is far above the average of country 
school plants, and will compare very favorably with those of 
not a few cities. 

During the year the grading of the Manning and Winthrop 
School lots has been nearly completed. Some of the maple 
trees that were shading the building and shutting off the sunlight 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 19 

from the school rooms, have been removed. When a good 
grass sod becomes established and a few flowering shrubs and 
ornamental trees are planted, due regard being given to their 
grouping and arrangement, we shall have a setting for our 
schools which will be an ornament to the town, and to which 
our citizens may point with pride. 

With a good school plant well established, our next duty 
requires a closer attention to the real function of the schools 
themselves. From this time on efficiency must be our watch- 
word. Everything must be done to secure the largest educa- 
tional return for the money invested, and to make our schools 
rank with those of the state and nation. We have the equip- 
ment mental as well as physical, and now it remains to give our 
school children the largest and fullest opportunity for self-help 
along all cultural and practical lines. It is our task to see that 
everything necessary for a well-rounded, systematical develop- 
ment of our youth is furnished to the full limit of their de- 
mands; and we have a right to expect that they will give back 
to this community and to the whole country as well, the help- 
fulness and the inspiration which is the fruit of an enlightened, 
high-minded citizenship. 

To accomplish this and to secure the realization of our 
hopes, it is necessary that we adopt and proceed along the lines 
of a policy that is dictated by sound judgment, large experience 
and practical common sense. 

We must secure the best teachers possible; our courses of 
study must be adapted to the needs of the pupils and the re- 
quirements of the times; our supervision must be strict and 
painstaking, and our training must be of the practical and effi- 
cient type. With this policy faithfully carried out through all 
the grades, we may reasonably expect and demand that our 
pupils shall rank well in scholarship and in character. 

Your Committee is very desirous that more of our graduates 



20 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



should prepare for college. In other towns and cities the num- 
ber so doing is increasing rapidly each year. We are at a loss 
to understand why more of our young men and young women 
are not preparing to do so here. Certainly it is realized that 
the demand for college-trained men is greater than ever be- 
fore. In many cases positions are awaiting those who are to 
graduate. Other things being equal, the college boy is promo- 
ted more rapidly and secures better positions than those not so 
trained. The acquaintance of men gained in college is of the 
greatest value, and many a business man can attribute his suc- 
cess to the friendships formed while in college. The training 
and the discipline received in the higher schools make for 
higher efficiency and give larger returns in service of every 
kind. 

Times are changing rapidly. Occupations that called for 
little or no special training a generation ago, now depend upon 
it for their very existence. The revolutionary changes in our 

manufacturing industries, as evidenced bv the demands of the 
European war, have been brought about by educated men well- 
trained in these highly sDecia^'zed branches; and the demand is 
increasing every day. When the old world industrial progress 
is resumed and we are brought into open competition with it, 
our prosperity and our place among the nations will depend 
more upon the number and the ability of our specially educated 
classes than upon any other single factor. Our larp-est banking 
institutions and industrial enterprises are aware of this fact, and 
are giving special training to college graduates along their sev- 
eral lines. 

Our consular service is open to men of college training. In 
civil service, too, the educated man has the advantage as he 
does in everything else. "Knowledge is power." We should 
have from twelve to fifteen young men and young women pre- 
paring for college each year. If our young people have any 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 21 



aspirations for something higher and better than the common- 
place and the ordinary, they must have the education and train- 
ing which the times so insistently demand. 

Our superintendent informs us that nearly every week our 
schools are visited by representatives of teachers' agencies, 
school principals and superintendents in search of teachers. 
From this it is very evident that there is no such thing as pro- 
fessional courtesy among superintendents. The best teachers 
of course are the ones selected, and if we cannot meet this 
competitive bidding by offering an equal advance, we lose the 
teacher. This is discouraging and demoralizing, and the school 
loses in efficience. We cannot fi^ht them with their own weap- 
ons, for we have no reserve fund upon which to draw. So far, 
however, we have been fortunate; but provision should be made 
whereby this practice may be checked, or the upbuilding of our 
schools cannot be accomplished. A good teacher is worthy of 
her hire, and the law of supply and demand will keep her near 
the maximum value. If we wish to retain our best teachers, we 
must pay the market price. If this cannot be done, we must 

submit to the inevitable in school matters, and lose both rank 
and influence. 

Your Committee is unanimous in recommending a larger 
appropriation for salaries, and reductions in other items have 
been made in order that this may be granted. We cannot af- 
ford in view of our large investment in plant and other heavy 
expense charges to have this, the most vital organ in the whole 
school system, endangered or made to suffer by any such pirat- 
ical methods. An enlightened sentiment alone would seem to 
dictate the better policj'. When we consider the education of 
our children, which is the true function of our schools — what it 
means to them and to the community, both now and in the fu- 
ture — what more need be said? Here is the condition! Shall 
we meet it, or shall we fail? 



22 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



The subject of the education of our non-English speaking 
population is rapidly forging to the front. Both the federal and 
the state governments are urging better provisions for the in- 
struction of these people, with the ultimate view to citizenship. 
Attendance is compulsory up to the age of 2 1 years for both 
sexes, and the duties and responsibilities of the attendance offi- 
cer have been greatly increased thereby. The law also compels 
him to have an up-to-the-minute census of all school children 
and minors. 

An effort also is being made to secure the passage of a law 
which will compel cities and towns to maintain a continuation, 
or part-time school during the summer months for those be- 
tween the ages of fourteen and sixteen years, who are obliged 
to work in our mills and factories. Should this bill become a 
law, our school operations must be considerably extended in 
order to meet its requirements. As yet, however, this is but a 
contingency, and no provision has been made thus far to meet 
the emergency should it actually arise. 

Other proposed legislation may require your careful atten- 
tion, and sanction or objection, as the merits of such bills may 
demand. 

Just before the opening of the fall term of school, Mr. Fred- 
eric B. Knight, our school superintendent, received a call froi 
the School Committee of the neighboring town of Danvers, at a 
considerable advance in salary. The good work which he ac- 
complished here will always remain a conclusive proof of his 
energy and ability along the lines of his profession. He left be- 
hind him many warm friends who wish him continued success 
and usefulness in his new field of work, and who confidently 
expect to hear of still greater advancement. 

After considering a large number of applicants to fill the 
vacancy caused by the resignation of Mr. Knight, the School 
Committee sought out Mr. Joseph I. Horton, of the Somerville 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 23 



High School, and formerly a teacher in this town. We were 

unanimous in the choice, and we felt that the School Commit- 
tee, as well as the citizens of the Town of Ipswich, were most 
fortunate in securing him. He has our unanimous support, and 
we are sure that the town, as well as the committee, has a 
strong feeling of confidence in his judgment and ability. 

The full statement of receipts and expenditures of this de- 
partment for the year just closed forms a part of this report, and 
your careful inspection of the same is earnestly solicited, The 
budget for the current year has been made up and gone over 
with a great deal of care. To this, also, your careful attention is 
desired. 

The appropriation asked for is $43,000. The School De- 
partment has an income from Rowley pupils and other minor 
sources of approximately $3,500. Therefore, it will be neces- 
sary to raise by taxation about $39,500. 

The School Committee acknowledge with feelings of grat- 
itude the fine spirit of co-operation and real helpfulness and in- 
terest which our citizens have shown to them in the discharge 
of the duties of this department. The custom has been estab- 
tablished, commencing this past fall, of having all the School 
Committee meetings open to the public, and tt is hoped that 
any citizens who are interested in school matters will come to 
these meetings, where they will have an opportunity to see how 
the work is conducted and to express their views on any mat- 
ters they may desire. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HERBERT W. MASON, Chairman 
HOWARD N. DOUGHTY, Secretary 
GEORGE E. MacARTHUR 
WILLIAM J. RILEY 
JOSEPH W. ROSS 

School Committee of Ipswich. 



24 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 

Distribution of Pupils In the Ipswich Schools 
By Grades and Ages. 



Ages 



Grades 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Total, 

I 31 61 31 21 4 1 1 150 

II 13 51 3 1 117 3 1 117 

III 1 21 44 33 13 7 2 1 1 123 

IV 6 44 15 15 2 I 1 3 87 

V 2 12 3J 16 10 5 4 1 81 

VI 8 16 23 10 6 1 1 65 

VII 16 29 21 8 2 1 77 

VIII 1 6 12 2 3 12 11 1 66 

IX 4 17 31 20 7 I 80 

X 2 15 19 16 4 2 58 

XI 1 1 20 5 1 37 

XII 2 1 26 3 2 34 



975 

Pupils making rapid progress 1 8 1 

Pupils making normal progress 62 1 

Pupils making slow progress 1 73 

975 

The numbers underscored show normal progress; those be- 
fore them, rapid progress; those following, slow progress. The 
number in this last class is altogether too large. This may be 
due to causes noted in another part of this report. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the School Committee of Ipswich, Massachusetts, 

Gentlemen: — 

I herewith submit for your consideration the 
following report of the conditions of our schools. This is the 
1 5th annual report issued by our superintendents, and covers 
less than four months' time of my own incumbency. 

Little attempt has been made thus far to alter or revise 
courses of study. But one change of text-book has taken place. 
A few new methods of instruction have been suggested and, so 
far as conditions would allow, definite limits to be covered in 
the different subjects have been fixed. Conditions of promo- 
tion and graduation have been restated and other more radical 
changes are ready for installation when the same may be made 
with the least disturbance to the school work. 

Generally speaking, however, the progress of the schools 
has not been interrupted. I have devoted myself chiefly tow- 
ards strengthening the work of the teaching and building upon 
the lines already laid down by my predecessor. This, I am 
constrained to believe, is the only rational course to pursue, as 
confusion and loss would inevitably follow any material dis- 
turbance of the settled work of the schools. 

To announce at this time, after so short an acquaintance, 



26 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



any broad outline or policy for the further development of our 
school system would be presumptuous on my part. So far as 
the clerical work of the office will permit, I feel that all the aid 
I can render should be given to making our schools more effi- 
cient. To bring up the grades to a higher level, to strengthen 
the discipline, to promote the scholarship, and to inculcate loft- 
ier ideals of life and service — these above everything else have 
first claim upon my attention and demand the full measure of 
my time and strength. With these things well started towards 
their proper goals; with a fuller knowledge of our school and 
community needs; I shall feel more confident in submitting 
plans and policies for future effort. But this can be postponed 
for awhile; the other must be undertaken at once. 

I shall deal particularly with the work of the six lower 
grades, as these are the foundation not only of the school sys- 
tem but of life itself. The great majority of pupils never go be- 
yond this limit, and too many of them leave before it is reached. 
To not a few of them it is the last opportunity to come within 
the reach and influence of anything that will make for useful 
living, of anything that will uplift and inspire to loftier ideals of 
life and service. 

The foundation here should be laid broad and deep. No 
imperfect building should be permitted nor tolerated. Teachers 
entrusted to this work, far and above all others, should be ma- 
ture. They should possess a broad type of practical knowl- 
edge, scholarship and character. They should have wide ex- 
perience; be thoroughly up-to-date as to methods and practices 
of imparting knowledge; be able to govern, teach and guide 
these little ones in right ways of thought and action. They 

should have a strong motherly affection for all children; a clear 
and unshaken faith in the possibilities of every child. And 
then they should be paid according to their work and worth. 

The last six grades included in the Junior and Senior High 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 27 



Schools will be treated in a more general manner. Further de- 
tailed information concerning these schools may be obtained 
from the reports of their respective principals. 

For this reason my report may seem partial and fragment- 
ary. Some portions of it the teachers will recognize as a repe- 
tition of topics discussed at teachers' meetings. It will not con- 
tain many comparative tables as we are lacking in available ma- 
terial for such comparisons. It is written for home consumption 
— a heart-tc-heart talk with parents and others interested in the 
welfare of our schools. I wish to make my attitude toward our 
schools clearly understood, that I may have the cordial support 
and co-operation of all concerned. 



Needs. 

A rew repairs will be necessary, but no additional school 
accommodations will be needed for some years to come. 

Salaries of teachers need considerable adjustment. Those 
or teachers in the grades should be increased to the level of a 
living wage, at least; and were it not for the fact that many of 
tnem are held by home-ties, the law of supply and demand 
would operate most decidedly in their favor were they to re- 
move to other places. 

We shall also need an emergency kit for the Winthrop 
SchooL Pupils are injured in various ways and prompt atten- 
tion must be given these cases. They are often overcome by 
temporary illness and a bed in the sick-room of this building 
would be a great improvement over the ordinary settee in a 
crowded room. This would serve a triple purpose, giving the 
material where bed-making could be taught as a branch of Do- 
mestic Science work, and also used by the School Nurse in 
demonstrating how to prepare and change the bed-clothing 



28 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



without subjecting a sick person to unnecessary suffering 
or danger. To be able to do this, especially at a critical stage 
of a sickness, when life and death are in the balance, I consider 
as first-class efficiency and nearly on a par with one year of 
French. 

The Domestic Science Department also needs a good-sized 
copper boiler. The fixtures are all in place, and the boiler can 
be connected up and put into use in a very short time. 

The Manual Training Department is in need of a band-saw 
and a turning lathe. With these additions a much larger va- 
riety and a much better class of work could be done. The pur- 
chase of these may be delayed until prices are more reasona- 
ble. 

Some changes of text-books will be necessary by the open- 
ing of the schools in September, if not before. But not much 
will be attempted while books and supplies remain at present 
price-levels. 

Some improvements and beautifying of the playground 
about the Burley, Cogswell, Payne and Dennison schools are 
sadly needed if we wish to overcome the barren aspect which 
these places present. The children's ideas of the beautiful and 
the harmonious can never be developed in such environment. 

Improvements in the sanitary arrangements at the Payne 
and Cogswell Schools should have immediate attention. These 
are the onlv large school buildings in town that lack in this par- 
ticular, and measures should be taken to do away with the 
present unsightly, inconvenient and dangerous outbuildings as 
soon as possible. 

Several cases of diphtheria have developed among the pu- 
pils of one of these schools, and the teacher herself has become 
a victim of this much-dreaded disease. The loss of her services 
at this time is a serious drawback to the progress of the school, 
and one that we can ill-afford. But this is as nothing in 



IPSWICH SCHOOL RERORT. 29 



comparison to the suffering and distress which these victims 
and their families have been made to bear. Fortunately, there 
has been no loss of life. In justice it should be said that all the 
cases of diphtheria were not confined to this school. As far as 
the health authorities were concerned, they have been unable 
to locate the source of infection in any of these cases. Build- 
ings without proper sanitary conveniences are more liable to be 
a saintary menace than those where proper sanitary arrange- 
ments exist. This only emphasizes the necessity of removing 
every possible cause of a recurrence of any such loss and dan- 
ger, and I hope that the matter may receive the prompt and 
careful attention which its importance requires. 

The heating plant at the Burley School, consisting of three 
hot-air furnaces, has failed to heat the rooms properly during 
cold, blustering weather. A further trial of their capacity is 

being made, and we are in hopes that some way may be found 
to overcome present difficulties and avoid the expense of a 
change. 

It is possible that transportation for the children of the 
Linebrook School will be required at the beginning of the next 
school year. Nearly one half of the school consists of seventh 
grade pupils, and these should enter the Junior High School 
next September. Just what the membership of this school will 
be when the upper grade is withdrawn is problematical, but it 
is certain that the seventh grade should make the change. If 

these should come, the school will be too small to carry on as 
an independent unit, and therefore all should be transported. 

Better provisions for filing space should be made. The 

cabinet now in use is inadequate, and nearly three-fourths of 
the entire room is occupied by the records of labor certificates, 
census cards, and the school physician's records. Much of the 
superintendent's time is wasted in searching for records and 
other data that should be systematically filed where it would be 



30 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT 



available whenever need. 

This office is convenient to both the High and Winthrop 
Schools and should contain all the school records of the town. 
If better facilities for this work were provided, more of his 
time could be given to supervising the work of the schools. 

The duties and powers of the Attendance Officer have 
been greatly enlarged, and his responsibilities measurably in- 
creased by the new law recently made effective. He is obliged 
to keep a continuous census of all children and minors; to re- 
turn them to the day and to the night schools whenever ab- 
sences are reported; to visit factories shops, stores and other 
places where pupils are employed, and to note that the kind of 
work is in accordance with the law. In a word, to see that all 
pupils are in school and that no minor person is employed to 
do any work or under conditions that are contrary to the school 
and labor laws of the state. For any failure on his part to see 
that all the provisions are carried out according to the spirit and 
the letter of the several laws, he is liable to a fine. 



Beginnings. 

Beginnings have been made along several lines, and many 
others are under consideration. Some improvement has been 
made in reducing the time schedules for opening our schools. 
(There should be but one for all the sehools.) 

Tardiness and absences have become less frequent under 
the pressure which the Attendance Officer has brought to bear 
in these matters. He informs me this morning that but three 

pupils are absent from the Winthrop School — about one per 
cent. This is a splendid showing, 

More attention and care have been given to ranking, and a 
better preparation for promotion as well as for a more careful 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 31 

grading have become matters of larger concern. 

Short trips were undertaken by the lower grades during the 
fall and much valuable knowledge has been gained in the rudi- 
ments of geography and nature studies. 

Complete lists of selections to be memorized by each of 
the six grades have been made and are in practical use at the 
present time. To many of these little folks the opportunities 
along this line will be extremely limited; but a good start has been 
made, and by the time the work of the grades is completed 
they will have quite a stock of good literature stored away for 
future needs. 

A High School Column has been started in our local paper 
and our pupils are making an effort to acquire some skill along 
this line of -work. 

At the beginning of the winter the fourth grade was trans- 
ferred from the Warren Street School to the Winthrop Building 
without the loss of a single recitation. Even with this addition 
the seating capacity has not been taxed in the least. The rooms 
are better lighted, better heated and more desirable in every 
way. The expense of running an extra building has also been 
saved. 

The issuing of book-tickets has been put upon a more bus- 
iness-like basis, and fewer losses by the children have been ex- 
perienced. 

Some of our farmers have availed themselves of our offer 
to test milk for butter-fat, and more have expressed a desire to 
have their cows tested in the same way. 

The Domestic Science Depnrtment has been busy along its 
own lines. Relishes, jellies, jams, grape juice, lard, sausage and 
many other articles that enter into the economy of the home, 
have been made by the pupils from material furnished by dif- 
ferent individuals. Practice and experience were thus gained 
by the pupils, and all without expense to the school. 



32 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



And so the community spirit has been developed to a de- 
gree that would be impossible -without these departments. And 
so may it continue to develope until all the activities that make 
for educational, social and moral uplift in this community, cen- 
ter in, and radiate from, our schools. 



Some General Observations. 

Educational views were never more at variance than at the 
present time. Subjects that were considered essential to a thor- 
ough grounding in the fundamentals a few years ago, are now- 
held in doubt and uncertainty both as to their place and value. 

In methods, too, the same degree of difference exists as is 
found in the subject matter; and what to teach and how to 
teach it have become serious questions -with many besides lay- 
men. Schoolmen as well as businessmen find little to commend 
in the work of our elementary schools. They claim that our 
work is too superficial and lacks that degree of thoroughness 
and accuracy which is so essential in all business transactions. 
Colleges and higher institutions of learning are offering very 
substantial money prizes as an inducement to better scholar- 
ship. 

The causes which underlie these irritating conditions are 
many and varied in character. No small share of them lies 

away beyond the authority of the school, and teachers am 
school officers should not be expected to carry the full respon- 
sibility that does not properly rest upon their shoulders alone. 

Times change and habits of life and methods change with 
them. Ideals and aspirations are subject to the same rules. 
Changes in the home life and in the schools take place with th< 
same degree of frequency and of variation. 

The school is peculiarly sensitive to outside influences. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 33 



These become strong educational factors, either for good or 
for evil, and we are compelled to reckon with them. Any de- 
terioration in the home influence, any lowering of ideals, any 
encouragement to disobedience or upholding of wrongdoing, is 
bound to be reflected in school conduct, and, most usually, in 
an intensified form. The boy who shirks his duties and respon- 
sibilities at home, will try the same plan and methods at school. 
The boy's conduct in school is a very fair guage of his training 
at home. 

The case is desperate, indeed; but it is by no means hope- 
less. My purpose in stating these facts is to show the very 
close and vital connection between the home and the school — 
the two greatest institutions in the whole world — and to point 
out the absolute necessity for each to supplement and assist the 
other in the task of developing a strong, sturdy type of man- 
hood and womanhood that shall be at once our pride and our 
strength. 

And so it would seem that our first duty is to restore confi- 
dence, to revive that feeling of conscious strength born of suc- 
cessful accomplishment, and to implant an unquestioning faith 
in the old admonition to "Prove all things," and to "hold fast 
that which is good." Common sense is a rare commodity, and 
never yet has it sold at a discount. 

As to method, the most successful method in teaching is 
the method by which you can teach most successfully. There 
is no one method adapted to all classes or teachers. 

As to co-operation between parents and teachers, nothing 
is impossible. With a clear understanding of purpose, a firm 
determination to achieve that end, and with a full, sympathetic 
spirit between parent and teacher working together for a com- 
mon result, I think success will be assured. 

More than this: The reaction in school affairs, so long 
overdue, is beginning to manifest itself in a way that means 



34 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



substantial improvement. Schoolmen are awakening to the fact 
of our present needs and are testing our efficiency by very 
practical and scientific methods. These tests have been ap- 
plied to tens of thousands of pupils, and educational standards 
have been raised wherever the tests have been made. 

Business organizations, boards of trade, and chambers of 
commerce, in the different cities throughout the country, are 
taking a very acrive interest in this matter; and much that is su- 
perficial or wasteful has been eliminated. Local pride will no 
longer permit the drifting policy of the past. 

It has been discovered that school progress and efficiency 
are measurable quantities, and that standards of measurement 
have been found and adopted. School affairs are being brought 
up to a business basis. A longer day for high schools, more in- 
tensive study, better work on fewer subjects, better discipline, 
better preparation for life— these are some of the subjects tow- 
ards which some of the best minds are turning their attention, 
and great good will assuredly result therefrom. 



Our Schools. 

From what has already been said of schools in general, it 
will be gathered that conditions in our own schools are not pe- 
culiar to them alone. They prevail too generally, and may be 
found in many places where local pride and reputation in edu- 
cational matters would seem to demand something infinitely 
better. Expenditure alone is no guaranty of efficiency. 

The one general criticism that I make of our schools is that 
the teacher is doing too much of the pupil's work. There is 
no royal road to education. The boy must be trained to work 
and discover things for himself, else there is no possibility of 
mental development. Things are made too easy for him, and 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 35 



he becomes helpless by the excessive aid which is given alto- 
gether too freely. Help should riot be given until the point of 
discouragement is reached; and it would be better, even here, 
to stimulate his efrorts rather than to respond to his first call. 
Tne mastery of one problem by his own unaided effort does 
more to establish his confidence in himself and to make him 
self-reliant and useful than any number of problems where the 
teacher's brain and hand did everything. 

It is much easier, I admit, for the teacher to show a pupil 
and even to do the work for him, but this is not teaching. It is 
simply following the line of least resistance. There is no effort 
and no commendable result. Let the boy draw upon his own stock 
of knowledge, help him to proceed from the known to the 
unknown, and he will soon discover not only the tools he pos- 
sesses, but he will learn how to use them. In this way alcne, 
through mastery, can development, initiative, and interest be se- 
cured. I dislike to see a teacher giving and reciting a lesson at 
one and the same time. But such occasions are not so rare as I 
could wish. 

In some rooms there is considerable waste of effort by 
reason of lax methods of discipline. Any failure to secure and 
hold the attention of the class results in poor work. Nothing 
can be accomplished where pupils are busy with something 
outside the work of the class. A noticeable improvement in 
this respect has been made, but there is room for more, and 
this must be insisted upon. 

In arithmetic too much attention has been given to the ab- 
stract features of the subject, and the mental side has been too 
much neglected. It is necessary that pupils have the tables and 
various combination of numbers ready on immediate call; but 
aside from the fact that speed and facility in other work are 
better secured thereby, this work possesses very little of real ed- 
ucational value. It is a means to an end, rather than an end in 



36 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



itself. It is one of the tools, and a very necessary one, with 
which the pupil is to do his work and obtain both knowledge 
and skill in the using. 

But the real value of arithmetic as a thought-developing, 
mind-building power lies in its problems. This fact, it would 
seem, has not been recognized sufficiently by some of our 
teachers, and more work has been started along this line. 

We have begun in the lowest grades. The children them- 
selves are taught to make problems, from single-type models 
furnished by the teacher. These are all within the limit of his 
abstract number work and are drawn from sources with which 
he is familiar. He is allowed to present these to the class in 

competition with others, and the interest and enthusiasm of the 
whole class is secured. The teacher guides and directs; the 

class does the work. 

The difficulty of the problems and the sources from which 
they are drawn are increased and varied as the grade of the 
pupils demands. Effort is made to keep the work a little in 

advance of the mental capacitjr, so that the trend may always be 
upward. 

With the fifth and sixth grades the pupils are taken to the 
lumber-yards, the wood and coal-yards, and, by the courtesy of 
the proprietors, are allowed to measure and weigh these differ- 
ent commodities and to compute their value by practical bus- 
iness methods. Only the best boys have this privilege, and 
they furnish the rest of the class with the problem material. 
New groups are taken from day to day, and fluctuations in price 
are noted. In this way interest is secured and some practical 
knowledge gained of business ways and methods. And so the 
work is advanced and extended to other lines of activity, until 
the subject is completed. 

Too much stress has been placed upon method. There is 
no method that will reach every pupil in a typical class in a 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 37 



single recitation. The lecture method will do for college stu- 
dents and for upper classes in high schools. But it is not per- 
fectly adapted to children in the grades. More individual work 
must be done here, or the class cannot be held together; more 
pains must be taken with the slow pupils. 

There are three important steps in all good teaching: Prep- 
aration, presentation and penetration. While I have no inclina- 
tion to minimize or belittle the first two, I do wish to emphasize 
the last. Roughly speaking, I have named them in the order of 
their value. No matter how thoroughly the teacher prepares 

herself, nor how fully she presents the subject, if she neglects to 
acquaint herself with the results of her efforts, she fails. This 

should receive her undivided attention. She should know just 
what portion of her class, what individuals in that group, failed 
to get a clear understanding of the lesson taught. Here is the 
weak point of the system. Just here, too, is the cause of serious 
waste of time and effort. We should have more individual 

oversight and work by the teacher, more checking up of results, 
a more frequent "stock-taking." 

This is the practice with the upper classes in high schools. 
Why should it not prevail to a reasonable extent in the grades? 
It is useless for a teacher to assign work that is above the heads 
of fifty per cent, of her class. Wherever this has been the prac- 
tice, it should be discontinued. ' 

Yet this is just what she too often does; and all unconsciously, 
too. From her last test she learns that the average per cent, of 
her class is 78, we will say; and the showing comforts her. But 
does she realize that in a class of 40, with 70 as the passing 
mark, that nearly three-fourths of the class might fail of promo- 
tion? 

Would it not have been better, and would not the inform- 
ation gained been in a more usable form, had she found what 
per cent, of her class had done all the work perfectly? To 



38 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



obtain the average in the example given, it would not be neces- 
sary for a single pupil to reach the 1 00 mark, and there is the 
possibility of but only eleven of her class- — a little over one- 
fourth — being promoted. 

Had this second method been employed, assignments of 
work would have better suited the ability of the class and more 
thorough work would have been done. Weak points would 

have been located and the specific remedy applied. 

This is a purely hypothetical proposition, I admit, and these 
same figures may be made to show very different results. But 
it answers the purpose and shows that in the assignment of work 
we must not place too much dependence upon general aver- 
ages. We need to rely upon a more selective process. 

More care should be devoted to the arrangement of the pu- 
pil s work. He should be taught to have all his material at hand 
and ready for use when his recitation is called; to arrange his 
work carefully and neatly upon the paper, and learn to use the 
same economically. In many ways the training so received will 
be of greatest value to him in after life. 

There is still another factor which must not be overlooked. 
A law without a penalty has no force. The boy, at the very 
outset, must be made to realize that he is to be held to a strict 
accountability for the work assigned him, and that there is no 
escape from this decree. Let him but understand that his work 
must be done at the time and in the manner prescribed, or his 
freedom is to be forfeited, and he will put forth some effort. In 
nine cases of ten there will be no occasion for the use of harsh 
measures. Firmness and persistence will do much better; and, 
after a little training, he will swing into line and become a wil- 
ling, cheerful, and dependable bov. His progress will become 
noticeable wherever the pressure of this firm, guiding hand is 
felt, and it should be and must be felt all along the line. I have 
seen so much real good accomplished by this method, and so 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 39 



many terrible failures from its opposite, that I am forced to be- 
lieve that training and discipline are not only the ultimate aim 
and purpose of all teaching, but they are also its greatest help. 

Just to summarize a little before leaving this subject, I 
would advise: 

More drill on the fundamentals. 

More emphasis on mental work. 

More work on problems. 

More training in the methods of attacking problems. 

More emphasis on the teaching of principles. 

More frequent application of these principles. 

More review work. 

More use of diagrams and graphs. , 

More drill in the methods of systematic work. 

More firmness in holding the pupils up to their work. 



Spelling. 

In spelling, the amount of the work has been doubled. The 
pupil has been allowed to make his own selection within given 
limits, and thus to assume the responsibility of right selection 
and failure as well. 

Spelling matches and tests are frequently given, and quite a 
little competition has arisen between the same grades in differ- 
ent schools and different grades in the same school. This pro- 
motes a lively interest in the subject and furnishes some very 
good team-work also. I am expecting to give the tests used by 
Dr. Leonard P. Ayres of the Russell Sage Foundation. This 

will enable us to make comparisons between the schools of 
other places with our own and to determine our average of 
standing. 



40 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Penmanship. 

We are extremely fortunate in having so large a number of 
really good penmen in the grades. Many of them hold certif- 
icates, and the others will be required to qualify within a reason- 
able time. 

In some of the grades the work is exceptionally good, and 
from all of them we should have most gratifying results before 
the end of the year. 

I have been tempted to have one or two of these teachers 
supervise the work of penmanship in the other rooms, but I 
have not come to a full decision as yet. The question needs to 
be thought out very carefully, as what 3'ou would gain in one 
direction might be more than offset in other ways. But if all 

written work done in school is conducted on the basis of a 
writing lesson, the improvement will be most satisfactory. In 

exercises outside of the regular writing lesson, the teacher is not 
apt to insist upon position and movement. If this were done, 
both position and the free arm movement would become habit- 
ual to the pupil, and his penmanship would show marked im- 
provement in a very short time. 

A few teachers still forget that position and movement come 
before form, and by reversing this order accomplish nothing 
towards correct training in this very essential branch of our ed 
ucation. 

Composition and other written exercises should be marke 
on the basis of good, clean work in penmanship as well as that 
of the subject under examination. 



: 



History. 

In history, the pupils have been urged to make larger use 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 41 



of books of reference found in our Public Library, and to draw 
their information from every reliable source. The work in this 
subject is to be supplemented by visits to our own Historical 
House, the Peabodv Institute at Salem, and if possible by visits 
to Lexington and Boston. We hope also to make use of the 

stereopticon, and to have the study become a source of enter- 
tainment to the parents and others who are interested in histor- 
ical work. We have arranged for several lectures to be given 
later in the season. 



Grammar and Language. 

It is well settled conviction among those qualified to speak 
that technical grammar should be eliminated from the grades. 
They openly declare that to begin the subject earlier than the 
freshman year in the high school is a sheer waste of time. 

The trouble is that we have taken this advice too literally, 
and so this subject makes the poorest showing of any in the 
whole list. To be sure, some portions of the subject may and 

should be eliminated; but, in a modified form, it still has a nec- 
cessary place in the grades. 

If we postpone this subject until the pupil enters the high 
school, what is to become of the great majority of pupils who 
never enter the high school? So far as these pupils are con- 
cerned, the subject may as well be postponed until the first year 
in college. 

They will derive no benefit from it, and they will be com- 
pelled to go through life conscious of the lack of something that 
might have been supplied. It seems to me that, if there be any 
value in the subject at all, these pupils whose educational ad- 
vantages are extremely limited, should have this benefit at the 
earliest possible moment. They should be taught how to 



42 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



correct errors in speech and be able to give a reason for so 
doing. 

And what about the boy who does enter the high school? 
Would this previous acquaintance with the subject be helpful to 
him? I have talked with a large number of high school teach- 
ers on this point — teachers of modern and ancient languages — 
and they invariably declare that it would be helpful. They 

point to this as the one great obstacle in the way of their pro- 
gress. 

There is another point of view to be considered in connec- 
tion with this subject: The modern trend and tendency have 
been to bring the high school subjects down to the grades. For 
example, algebra, geometry, bookkeeping, physiology, Latin and 
many others have been given a place in the upper grades of the 
grammar schools; while English grammar, which deals with th< 
structure and uses of the mother tongue, has been pushed for- 
ward, out of the reach of the majority, into the high school. The 
whole subject should not be so treated. 

The industrial and educational value of a pupil's time, with- 
in reasonable limits, depends upon the age and maturity of the 
pupil. This has been conclusively proven by numerous sur- 
veys, made in different parts of the country and covering mam 
varieties of industrial conditions. 

Other things being equal, the high school graduate far out- 
strips the graduate of the grammar school by reason of the dif- 
ference in ages alone, and he holds his job for a longer period 
of time for the same reason. Now, if there is to be any waste 
of time permitted, the earlier in the life of the pupil it is al- 
lowed, the smaller will be the resulting loss. 

I recently visited a class in the High School. It was one oi 
the largest we have. Ninety-nine per cent, of that class wouh 
never go beyond this school, and many of them would not 
complete the full course. Here was a class of boys and girls, 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 43 



the end of whose school life was in view, indulging in the bliss- 
ful occupation of selecting and naming the different parts of 
speech in the text before them. Needless to say I was deeply 

impressed with the sheer waste of time. 

As 1 have said before, a modified form of technical gram- 
mar may still serve some useful purpose in the grades, and I 
have some excellent authority to support this contention. At 

present I am formulating some simple outlines of this subject, to 
the end that a large majority of our pupils may get a little 
knowledge of the structure and usages of the English language. 

It should not be inferred from the foregoing that all the 
emphasis is to be placed upon the grammatical side of the sub- 
ject. Far from it. The greatest stress has been given to oral 
and written composition work. The pupil is constantly admon- 
ished to "say it in good English." He is required to look upon 
all his recitations as a feature of language work, and is encour- 
aged to speak easily, naturally, and correctly. 

In addition to this, much time is devoted to readings from 
the best authors, and not a few selections are committed to 
memory. We feel that all possible should be done to assist 

these young people to acquire a taste for good literature, and I 
think we are doing a good work in this direction. 



Reading. 

In reading, most of the work is good. The pupils are get- 
ting an amount of information from their reading books today 
that was not even dreamed of ten years ago. The only danger 
here is that the thought is engaged more in the accumulation of 
knowledge than in giving correct and pleasing expression in the 
rendering of the paragraph read. 

The spirit of commercialism with which all seem to be so 



44 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



thoroughly imbued has dictated too much, perhaps, the type of 
reading matter to be used. Some modification of this selection 
may result in an improvement in this direetion, so that reading 
aloud and good reading may not wholly become lost arts. 

With theexception of geography, which is begun in an in- 
ductive^way by the lowest grades, and carried along much in 
the same lines as is the study of history, I have taken up each 
subject taught in the grades. I feel that this is the place for a 

beginning, and consequently I have given more space and atten- 
tion to this part of our school system. As a last word on this 
part of my report, may I ask that the parents exercise the utmost 
diligence and care in keeping their children in school, and to 
give their fullest sympathy and support in co-operation with the 
efforts of the teacher. Nothing can repay you better, except, 
perhaps, a personal visit to the school. 



The High School. 

Our High School is working under a very severe handica] 
The school opens at 8:30 a.m. and closes nominally at 1:30 p.] 
Many of our pupils use the electric cars which arrive at the 
Square at the same time the school opens. Of course this makes 
it impossible for these pupils to get into the school and take 
part in the opening exercises, and much confusion and tardi- 
ness result from this cause. To add to these difficulties, some 
of the High School pupils are transported by barge along with 
others who attend the lower grades. The grades open at 9 

o'clock, and teachers are required to be in their rooms not later 
than 1 5 minutes before the time of opening. 

In order to have the pupils at the High School on time, the 
children of the grade schools are obliged to remain out of doors 
or to accept such shelter as they can find until the teacher 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 45 



arrives at 8:45. This means from twenty to thirty minutes ex- 
posure for little children who have already made the journey 
from Castle Hill Farm on the east, or the Topsfield line on the 
west. 

This is as shameful as it is cruel; and though I interested 
myself to have schoolroom doors opened in season for these 
little people, the privilege was so flagrantly abused by the chil- 
dren and others living nearby, that I Was forced to instruct the 
drivers of the barges to postpone their time of starting thirty- 
minutes. This aggravated still more the condition at the High 
School. But it was simply a choice of two evils, and I adopted 
the one that seemed to be the more humane. 

At present, pupils and teachers are scattered throughout the 
building during the first ten or fifteen minutes of the morning. 
Now this is all wrong and every teacher in the building deplores 
such a situation. Every pupil and every teacher should be in 

their proper places in the upper hall on the first signal, as a 
compact student body. What chance is there for developing a 
fine, strong school spirit? 

No wonder we fail to find material for athletic teams in 
such scattered groups! There can be no good school feeling 
under such conditions, and they should not be allowed to exist. 

At noon, too, the school is obliged to dismiss a few min- 
utes before the schedule time to allow the pupils to take the 
car in the Square at 1 :30. This is not conducive to a serious- 
ness of work, as the pupil's attention and effort are centered on 
catching the car." He feels aggrieved if he is asked to remain 
to complete his work and his plea is, "I shall lose my car." This, 
too, is all wrong. Such a tremendous waste of time in any bus- 
iness or manufacturing establishment would drive the concern 
into bankruptcy forthwith. The efficiency of our schools de- 
pends upon the same economic principles as does any business 
proposition, and we must be governed by them if we are to 



46 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



succeed. 

To bring this school under good working conditions and to 
give it a fighting chance to rank high with other schools, some 
changes should he made that at the present time will seem rad- 
ical. Mr. Marston, I understand, attempted a solution of this 
problem by putting the opening hour ahead to 8 o'clock. This 
he found was objected to by the parents as being too early, and 
the idea was given up. If you put it forward the domestic ar- 
rangements will be disturbed, and this must not be tolerated. 

It is rather humiliating to be forced to admit that the use- 
fulness of our schools and the high esteem in which they have 
invariably been held are to be jeopardized or endangered by 
such trifling matters as car-time and dinner-time. If the school 
is to have first place, as it should have, then let the school dom- 
inate, and let these others fall back into second place where 
they belong. This question is for the parents to decide. 

The only solution of this problem that promises anything 
that will be satisfactory and permanent, is to have the opening 
for all the schools fixed at one definite aod stated time, either at 
8:45 or 9 o'clock as may be found best adapted to local condi- 
tions. At noon the children should be allowed twenty or 
twenty-five minutes for lunch and to have something hot with it 
— either a cup of hot cocoa or a bowl of hot soup, or the like; 
or they should go home to their dinner. By the first method* 
our needs could be supplied by the Domestic Science Depart- 
ment at cost, and much of the time and effort of the pupil be 
saved. This plan would eliminate the supervision of the noon 
hour. Work could be resumed with slight interruption. Pupils 
could remain after school and complete their work. There 
would be no coming back to make up as at present, and teach- 
ers and pupils would be free to utilize their time to the best ad- 
vantage. Mr. Marston and some of his teachers return to the 
school every afternoon in the week but Friday, for make-up 






IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 47 



work. They have borne all this uncomplainingly for a long 

time, and I think that some relief should be afforded them. The 
second method would be a return to the two-session plan that 
was recommended by the State Board of education two years 
ago. (See School Report for 1915, page 64, 2nd paragraph.) 

In view of the fact that the question of a six-hour day for 
high schools is being so generally discussed, that it has been 
already adopted in many places and is likely to be fixed by 
legislative enactment, it would seem better to postpone for the 
present any change in schedule. But the remedy should be ap- 
plied soon. 

There is too much duplication of work in this school. 
Teachers are obliged to spend too much of their time in drilling 
upon fundamentals. This occurs mostly with commercial sub- 
jects; but, I am sorry to say, it is not confined to this group 
alone. These subjects should be taken here for the benefit of 
a hurried review of principles and to acquire a higher degree of 
speed and accuracy. A good foundation should have been 

laid before reaching the High School. When this is done, pro- 
gress in this school will be much more rapid. 

An unusually large number from the present senior class 
are preparing for higher schools. Five are to go to college, 
eight or nine to normal schools, and six or seven to commercial 
schools. This is setting an excellent example to the lower clas- 
ses, and we hope it may bear much fruit. 

The usual courses of lectures on physiology and hygiene 
for the freshman has been given by Dr. F. L. Collins, who has 
succeeded in holding the interest of the class from the very be- 
ginning. Much valuable information outside the technical re- 
quirements of the subject has been imparted; and the pupils 
have been given every encouragement to ask questions and to 
enter into discussions of subjects within their grasp. Some no- 
tions relative to old superstitions have been given a death blow, 



48 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



and a better knowledge, of "germs," infection and preventive 
measures has been gained. Emphasis has been placed upon 
the proper foods, exercise in the open air, the required amount 
of sleep for young people, and upon all those things which pro- 
mote growth. 

Sanitation, care of the teeth, and the rational treatment of 
the body as a whole have received a good share of attention. 
Proper clothing, bathing and many of those things that tend to 
give the body immunity from disease have been gone over very 
carefully. The value of a sound body to the individual and to 
community, the larger capacity for usefulness and happiness 
furnished by such, have been made topics of deepest concern. 
Finally, self-control — the holding in check of the appetite and 
the passions — the personal element that makes so largely for 
success in life, has been driven home with a good deal of force, 
and we feel that much benefit will be derived from the way in 
which the whole subject has been treated. 



Shall the High School Be a Preparatory School or Not ? 

I have requested Mr. Marston, Principal of our High School, 
to furnish me a list of pupils who, after graduating here, have 
attended some higher institution of learning, especially a col- 
lege of recognized standing. He willingly complied and here 
is the list: 

Ralph H. Grant Harvard 

Ralph A. Hatch 

Curtis E. Lakeman 

Henry Joyce 

Francis P. Ross 

Lamson Glover 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 49 



Alice E. Perkins Boston University 

Alice M. Brown " 

Fannie Goodhue 

Roscoe Vining 

Marion Morton 

Charles E. Goodhue 

Helen Blodgett " 

Arthur S. Lord University of Maine 

Charles Kelley, Jr 

Herbert Pickup 

Hermon Kyes 

Henry Spaulding Mass. Institute of Tech. 

Roland Willcomb 

George K. Perley*. 

Leander Hills 

E. Mark Sullivan Boston College 

Thomas Broderick 

Edith M. Daniels Mt. Holyoke 

Lucy Harris .■ . . . 

Marion P. Ross Wellesley 

Dorothy Hudgens Radcliff 

Harriet Robinson Simmons 

George Holmes Amherst Agricultural College 

Nearly a score and a half, and all during the principalship 
of one man. These are all known to us. We are acquainted 
•with the different callings in which they are engaged and with 
the substantial success which they have already won. 

But whv not others? Is it the fault of the school? These 
did not find it so. Six of them entered Harvard, the highest in- 
stitution of learning in the whole land, one of the very few col- 
leges that will not admit upon certificate, and, as I understand, 
nearly all passed without condition. 



50 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 






And what of the other colleges? There's not a school in 
the whole list that one need be ashamed to own as his Alma 
Mater. A diploma from any one of them is a guaranty of 

splendid effort and successful accomplishment. Furthermore, 
it is a passoort into the highest and best social and intellectual 
circles. Its possession is its holder's best asset. It gives him 
prestige in the most direct way and in the shortest time. It 

helps to greater and richer rewards. Next to character, it is the 
one thing needful for a full equipment. 

Whv do not more strive to secure these advantages? It is 
not the fault of the school, as has been already shown. It can- 
not be for financial reasons. There never was a time when 
financial aid for such a purpose could be more freely obtained 
than now. Men of means everywhere make the matter of pe- 
cuniary assistance to young men trying to complete a college 
course a considerable part of their benefactions. As the chair- 
man of our School Committee told us in his address to the 
school, he knew of one man who was assisting twenty-five 
young men through college each year, by loaning them money 
at a very low rate of interest. We commend his wisdom and 
his charity, and we rejoice to know that he is not alone in this 
good work. The Grange offers to finance four boys through 
college each vear. Not the Agricultural College alone, but any 
college in good standing. The pupil makes application for the 
loan, furnishes the required evidence of scholarship and char- 
acter, and, if these are satisfactory, gives his note for the amount 
loaned at two per cent, interest. 

Rierht here in our town, too, which always has had a splen- 
did surplus of good-will, there are funds available for just such 
purposes. If this be your reason, why not avail yourself or 

these offers. We have shown the way, and here our obligation 
ends. If you neglect, or refuse to walk therein, the responsibil- 
ity and the regret will always be yours. If our American boys 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 51 



neglect these opportunities, we know by whom they will be im- 
proved. 

What an educational uplift it would be to our good old 
town, if ten young men and young women were each year pre- 
paring for college! How it would delight the hearts of all who 
take a deep and kindly interest in the welfare of our youth, and 
how our schools would benefited and honored! This would be 
the consummation of our hopes. 

But we are nearing the parting of the ways. We must make 
decision soon. It is both unwise and unjust to continue our 
present course. If we cannot secure a college preparatory class 
of reasonable size, the grade of our High School will probably 
be changed and our whole educational prospect seriously 
dimmed. 

"It is a small school, but there are those who love it," as 
was well attested by the reception tendered the superintendent. 
No finer compliment could be given the school than was evi- 
denced on that occasion. In view of all these facts, — just as 
sentiment is increasing and home-ties and attachment for the 
school are becoming stronger, — to be obliged to change the 
grade of the school would be both a pity and a shame. 

This is no preachment; it is not a warning. It is an earnest 
appeal to the parents, and to the pupils of our schools. It comes 
from those who take a deep and vital interest in our educational 
welfare. I sincerely hope that these petitions may be favorably 
regarded and that you will make a wise decision now. 



The High School a Civic Center. 

The Friday afternoon assemblies in Manning Hall have 
been held as usual. These exercises have been varied from 

week to week. Lectures, speaking by the seniors, debates and 



52 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



chorus work, have contributed toward sustaining this work. 

Owing to the time of day at which these exercises have 
been held, the general public has not derived any benefit from 
them. This we hope to remedy soon, as the electric wiring is 
completed, by giving evening lectures and class exercises for 
parents and the general public as well. These, for the most 
past, are to be illustrated by means of a stereopticon. 

As the capacity of the hall is very limited, admission will be 
by ticket and, in most cases, free. During the early fall we 

communicated with the advertising departments of several of 
the largest enterprises as well as with private individuals. The 
State Board of Agriculture, the State Ornithologist, the State 
Forester, Massachusetts Agricultural College, and these we in- 
tend to supplement by others at different times, so that all our 
own local organizations may be given the same opportunity as 
the individual to eniov what we hope may prove to be one of 
our best educational agencies. Such is our general plan, the 

details of which are to be worked out and announcements made 
through the pupils of the school as well as by the public press. 

In this way we are in hopes to lay the foundation for the 
extension work of our schools, which will penetrate into every 
home in our community where each shall receive an impulse 
to gain fuller knowledge of what is taking place in the world 
about him. 

The Community Chorus has the use of the Manning Hall 
for its meeting. The Girls' Friendly Society classes occupy the 
rooms of the Domestic science department six times a month. 
Our farmers are urged to make use of our physical and chem- 
ical laboratories to the fullest possible extent. The head of 
these departments is competent, and will gladly give of his time 
and service where it does not interfere with his school duties. 
A few samples of milk have been tested for butter-fat, and more 
farmers might avail themselves of this privilege much to their 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 53 



advantage. 

Our drawing classes offer the same opportunities to those 
of artistic tendencies. The school chorus, held every Thursday 
morning from 8:30 to 9:10, is open to all who can attend at that 
hour. Our Cooking Department is at present too full to make 
similar offers, but we are in hopes to make arrangements 
whereby the young housekeepers of this community may have 
an opportunity to become acquainted with the latest methods in 
home-making. 

The Camp Fire Girls hold their meetings in one of the reci- 
tation rooms, and the Greek orchestra occupied another of the 
smaller rooms. Through some misunderstanding as to the 

length of time that this room could be secured, they removed to 
the Y.M.GA. building where they are meeting in increasing 
numbers twice each week. 

I heartily commend them for the enthusiasm which they 
have thrown into their work. This class started with five mem- 
bers; at present it numbers fifteen. They are an industrious, 
intelligent and courteous set of young men, and I am glad to 
know that our school was able to give them a start in this direc- 
tion. 

And so, in all departments, the school authorities desire to 
be of the largest possible service to the pupils of the schools 
and all the people of the town; to encourage and develope that 
get-together spirit, where all may co-operate and assist in 
making our schools stand for all that is helpful and uplifting. 



Ranks, Marks and Promotion. 

Ranks and marks at best are, by many, considered as nec- 
essary evils. In many cases they may be grossly misleading. 
They may often fail to represent a true and dependable standard 



54 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



and sometimes they may exhibit all the earmarks of premed- 
itated, deception. This is the burden of their cry. 

All this may be true, and in some exceptional cases it is 
true. But even these scathing denunciations cannot destroy the 
intrinsic value of the system as a convenient method of record- 
ing a pupil's work. There is no substitute and their use is well 
nigh universal. So long as the mark is fair and just to all the 

parties concerned, there will be no trouble; and let it be remem- 
bered that the standing of our schools depends upon the integ- 
rity of our marking. The school therefore becomes an interest- 
ed part and pupils and teachers should fully realize this fact. 
Every undeserved mark given injures both the boy and the good 
name of the school; and no school, any more than the individ- 
ual that indulges or tolerates any deceptive practices, can main- 
tain its character or standing. 

I have asked that our teachers use the utmost care in this 
matter and that the marks be fair and just, and based upon the 
evidence of good, honest work. By no other rational method 
can teachers and pupils be held to a strict accountability; by no 
other means can the responsibility be so definitely fixed. For the 
present, at least, this will be our method of measuring the work of 
the teacher and pupil alike, and I shall endeavor to see that a 
reasonable parity between marks and results is maintained. 
This we hope will furnish an equitable basis for grading. 

Before leaving this subject I wish to call attention to an ex- 
tension of the marking system as practiced in many other towns 
and cities: Any school pupil who takes outside work of recog- 
nized educational value under a competent instructor for one 
full year's time, may receive a certain number of credits towards 
his school work upon giving satisfactory evidence that such 
work has actually been done. 

So far, elocution, music— both vocal and instrumental — 
and drawing have been the only subjects that have been given 



IPSWICH* SCHOOL REPORT. 55 



recognition. I know of one instance, at least, where a fine 

school orchestra was built up largely by this encouragement, 
and other similar cases could be cited. 

At first sight this may seem extremely visionary, but when 
we consider that every community owes a great deal to these 
individuals for the unremunerative but no less indispensable 
service which they give, we may be willing to change our views 
upon the matter. I for one would like to see it tried here. 

Our schools need closer grading. In too many instances 

the brighter pupils are carrying the drones; and the drones are 
perfectly willing to be carried. This condition conduces to 

comfort, but it lacks certain stimulating qualities which are so 
needful to the making of first-class schools. 

Nothing short of the pupil's best efforts should be accepted 
and we should strive in every possible way to secure this result. 
To do this a closer classification is necessary within the grades, 
whereby the brighter pupils can be given more work, and the 
others can be given more of the teacher's time and held to a 
stricter accountability. This has been accomplished by dividing 
the grades into two divisions, — an A and a B. By this means 

the assignment of work can be adapted to the ability of each 
division and the interest and progress of both maintained. 

The old method of promotion by classes has many serious 
objections and the time is close at hand when this method will 
give way to promotion by subject. It works out in this manner: 
A pupil required to rank in four subjects may fail in one and 
thus, by the present method, be barred from promotion. In 

nine cases out of ten, he will become indifferent to his work, 
careless in his conduct, or leave school altogether. By the pro- 
posed system he would be promoted in those subjects in which 
he ranked and repeat the one he failed. This keeps liim in the 
school and the shame caused by being obliged to work off his 
condition acts as a spur to better work. There is no injustice 



56 IPSWICH 



done and he keeps both his courage and his character. This will 
be a forward step and will remove a very obvious cause of re- 
tardation and make for genuine scholarship. 

In order to put this idea into actual practice our schedules 
and programs will need to be readjusted. But no serious dif- 
ficulty is expected in making the change, and we are confident 
that much good will be accomplished thereby. 

More and more emphasis is being placed upon ranks as a 
necessary condition for graduation. As soon as a pupil falls 
below in his work, the parents are promptly notified of the fact 
aad their co-operation requested. Oftentimes this becomes the 
saving-grace to a near-senior and teaches a valuable lesson of 
responsibility. 

The teachers are trying to make our diplomas mean more 
than they ever did before and to have the honorable standing 
of our schools securely maintained. 



Transportation. 

This is becoming a serious problem in all our towns where 
centralization of schools has become effective. The cost of 

doing this work forms no small percentage of the total appro- 
priation, in some instances taking as high as 25 percent, or one- 
fourth, of all money raised for school purposes. 

This should not be so; and is bound to result' in a general 
impairment of the teaching force, and a consequent lowering of 
school standards. 

I find by discussing the matter with other superintendents 
that we have been fully as generous as most towns; and that in 
many cases high school pupils— boys especially — walk from one 
and one-half to two and one-half miles to and from school 
daily. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 57 



Our own limit has been one mile, and other conditions be- 
sides distance have received little or no consideration. The 
age, the weather, the physical condition of the child and of the 
roads, all have a direct bearing upon the matter, and each 
should be treated as a separate factor in any attempted re- 
adjustment of this troublesome question. 

Our school populatian is very scattered, and there is no 
possibility of combining routes: The distances are too great 

and the time consumed too much as it is; so that any modifica- 
tion of the system as a whole must be along other lines. 

I believe that the older children, boys especially, can walk 
longer distances, in good weather, than they are now doing and 
with positive benefit to themselves. During stormy weather, 

more should ride even if they live considerably within the mile 
limit. It is too far, also, for children of the primary grades. 

It is a difficult question at best, and one that calls for the 
most painstaking care in its final settlement. A good map of 
the town would be a great help. 

As to the present service, it is and has been uniformly 
good, but here again there needs to be an extension of some 
routes. I am informed that two or three small children are 

obliged to walk between two and three miles to reach the point 
where the barge meets them. 

In another part of this report a chart may be found which 
will throw more light upon the subject. 



School Garden. 

The school garden this year could not be considered an 
unqualified success. The season was very backward and wet. 
Water stood upon the plot to be planted as late as June 1 7th, 
and crops requiring a long season could not be brought to 



58 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



maturity before the frost destroyed them. 

These were not our only troubles in connection with this 
work. Attendance is not compulsory. As soon as the novelty 
wore away it became difficult to get the children to give their 
plots the proper amount of care during the summer vacation, 
especially those children living at a distance. And second, a 
more serious difficulty, was the inducement which such a gar- 
den offered to those with thieving propensities. 

It is discouraging to a little f ellow after he has given all his 
time and care to his crop, to find it has been stolen just as he 
was about to gather it. His disappointment is greater than he 
can bear, and he becomes disgusted with farming as an occu- 
pation and quits. 

These troubles are not peculiar to Ipswich alone, and com- 
plaints along the lines indicated have been very general. But 
we do not propose to abandon the project yet. To do so 

this point would be setting the worst of all bad examples an< 
nullifying every sound principle of good training. Our chil- 

dren must be taught to rise above their discouragements, to toil 
on patiently and persistently, and at last to bring success out of 
seeming failure. If we can accomplish this, our garden will 
yield a splendid harvest — of noble men and women, in the 
making. 

The land can be drained at slight expense. More than 

fifty thousand school children in this state alone are engaged in 
this kind of work. The, old promise of seedtime and harvest 
still holds good. Then why should we give it up? 

What we need is faithful, intelligent, persistent supervision, 
to follow some definite, carefully-made plan of work. The 

preparation of the seedbed should be thorough and complete. 
General and specific directions as to the depth and time of 
planting the seed should be given. The advantages of the cold- 
frame should be explained. Transplanting, cultivation, 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 59 



spraying, crop development and harvesting should each receive 
careful attention. Complete records should be kept and, to de- 
velop the spirit of emulation, prizes should be offered and 
awards made at a public exhibition. School credits should also 
be given for punctual attendance and good work. 

The main garden should be used as a demonstration plot," 
as a source of supply for young plants that are to be transplant- 
ed, and for individual plots for such pupils as have no ground 
suitable for garden purposes. In a word, it should be the test- 
ing ground and the feeder to the home garden. 

This would eliminate the difficulties already mentioned, 
and the interest of the child would in no wise suffer. In fact, it 
would increase, since his ownership in both garden and crop 
would be more real and secure. 

There would also be the possibility of securing the interest 
of one or both parents, which would make for greater advan- 
tage still. The child could give the proper care at the right 
time, and if he was inclined to be negligent a command from 
the parent would set things right. The first vegetable success- 
fully grown and given a place on the family table would estab- 
lish the value of the garden in the household economy, and 
then all outside supervision could be dispensed with. 

At home, too, a few flowering plants could be cared for at 
the same time, and this feature of the work should receive spec- 
ial emphasis. Nothing can be better for both boys and girls 
than to awaken an interest in the growing of flowers. It is a 
fruitful source of pleasure and profit and contributes not a little 
towards making the home more attractive and beautiful. These 
would exert a most desirable influence and bring about just 
such results as the school gardens were expected to produce. 

The expense incurred will be trifling, if any, as we are in 
hopes to persuade some of our good people to give the project 
tneir moral and financial! support. 



60 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



The Essex County Agricultural School will furnish us with 
lecturers who will instruct, not only the children but as many of 
the town's people as are interested, in the best methods and 
practices to be followed in this kind of gardening. 

But before the garden itself is started, we plan to have the 
children plant seeds in glass jars or tumblers in the school 
rooms where the processes of germination and development 
may be watched and studied. This will be of interest to them 
and add quite a little to their stock of knowledge of the things 
close about them. The mysterious springing into life of the 
vital principle held in each tiny seed has a fascination that 
claims the attention and the admiration of young and old alike. 

This work will also furnish the subjects for language lessons 
during a part of the spring term. 



Excursions. 

Visits to our large cities for the older pupils and short local 
trips for the younger ones have been planned and, in the few 
instances where the idea has been carried out, very satisfactory 
results have been obtained. We dwell within an area con- 

taining vast stores of material exceedingly rich in historic in- 
terest. In fact, it is an exclusive field, it is peculiarly our own. 
With few exceptions, no part of the country can boast of such 
historic ground as we possess. The men who were so largely 
instrumental in shaping the policies of the nation, the men in 
whose hands its destinies were held, lived here; and we point 
with pride and admiration to what they achieved. 

It is the birthplace of many of our largest industries and 
some of them remain with us still. The stream of commerce as 
it flows through the near-bv port of Boston is exceeded in size 
and volume only by that of New York. And so we find right 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 61 



here within easy reach the evidences of all the activities and in- 
fluences, both past and present, that have made, not only our 
own section, but nearly every part of the country what it is 
today. 

The schools of Germany, France and Switzerland give very 
much more attention to this feature in their scheme of education 
than do we. Our Western States nearly always include it in 

their courses. 

Historic spots they have to be sure, and they take great 
pride in recounting the heroic deeds, the struggle and the sacri- 
fices of the early explorers and pioneers. But our history was 
old before theirs began. Their heroes were born here. 

To neglect such a fruitful field of knowledge, to overlook 
or underestimate the value of such an influence upon our youth 
in the upbuilding of national pride and in the development of a 
truer and deeper spirit of patriotism would be nothing short of 
a crime. Therefore we wish to utilize these advantages to the 
fullest degree. As most of the trips are to be made on Satur- 
days there will be no interruption in the regular school work. 

These are to be no junketing affairs. Every visit is to be 

carefully planned, talked over in the class before starting, and 
the whole matter invested with a seriousness of purpose befitting 
any class exercise. Afterwards a full report is to be made and 
discussed by the pupils. 

And so it is hoped that the several classes, from the young- 
est to the oldest, under the guidance of their respective teach- 
ers may be enabled to visit those places that have special bear- 
ing upon the regular work of the school. With a well-formed 
plan, rigidly adhered to and systematically carried out through 
all the grades, our pupils should have upon the completion of 
the course a fund of knowledge and experience that will assist 
them greatly in choosing a vocation, and in setting up right 
standards of service and useful living. 



62 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Penny Savings. 

Nearly twenty-five years ago the habit of saving small sums 
or money by the pupils was so well established that every in- 
dividual in the grammar school was the proud possessor of a 
bank book standing in his own name. From that time and for 
many years afterwards this work of developing the thrift-form- 
ing habit among our children was successfully carried on by a 
well-known lady of the town and, under her management, 
reached to very creditable proportions. 

Unfortunately some legal requirements took the matter out 
or her hands and transferred the work to the superintendent of 
schools, where it still remains in a state of suspended anima- 
tion. 

I have been told that a small balance is still in the bank. 
But who are the real depositors of the several sums making up 
the amount is wholly unknown. If all those who hold eredit 

cards will bring them to the office of the superintendent, he will 
attempt to adjust the accounts so that the work may be re- 
sumed. 

This matter should receive the attention that its importance 
demands. Schools in all wide-awake towns and cities point 

with pride to their accumulation of savings. The habit of 

thrift especially among Ameriean children can be taught none 
too soon. 

We have the reputation of being the most extravagant and 
wasteful people upon the earth. The average American family 
is face to face with debt continually. When accident or sick- 

ness overtakes us we have nothing with which to meet its extra 
demands. 

We try to teach our children how to earn money. Why 

not teach them how to save? This is the one great and neces- 
sary factor that makes for success. Without it, earning-power 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 63 

means but little more than failure. 

The following was taken from a recent number of one of 
our most reliable magazines: 

"Out of 1 00 average healthy men at 25 years of age, at 65 
36 w 
1 w 

4 w 

5 w 
and 54 w 

ity." 



11 be dead. 

11 be rich. 

11 be wealthy. 

11 be supporting themselves. 

11 be dependent upon friends, relatives or char- 



The statement above quoted has been denied, I am told. 
But whether it be true or false, this fact remains: That the num- 
ber of persons in every thousand in America who save is as 1 
to 5 when compared with those in Switzerland where the earn- 
ing power is very much less than it is here. 

The foreigner brings these habits of thrift with him, and 
unless our native-born children can be taught the same habits 
of frugality, but one result will follow. 

This work has been resumed. 



Suggestions to Parents. 

Up to the present time few or no suggestions have been 
made to regulate school attendance during extreme cold weath- 
er, i! don't know as much can be dune, certainly not with no- 
school signals. But a recent experience has convinced me that 
some effort should be made to relieve the discomfort and to 
prevent the actual suffering occasioned by this oversight. 

Here, as in evervthing else, the greatest suffering falls uqon 
those least able to bear it. The children of well-to-do parents 



64 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



are clothed to withstand the extreme cold and these for the 
most part remain at home on such days. But it is inhuman and 
cruel to expect or allow children that are ill-fed and poorly 
clad to face a biting wind at zero temperature. 

The school rooms, too, are not properly warmed on such 
days and regular work, under conditions prevailing at such 
times, is impossible. I visited all the schools in town on the 
morning of January 1 2 — when the thermometers registered as 
low as four degrees below zero — and in only two of these out- 
lying schools, the Dennison and the Wainwright, was the usual 
daily work in progress. / 

It is well-nigh impossible to change some of these condi- 
tions. All zero temperatures do not produce the same degree 
of discomfort. A very cold morning may have the promise of 
a beautiful day. The barge brings pupils of all the grades; 

some should come and others ought not to be allowed to come. 
If the barge drivers sre notified to remain at home, children will 
gather at the farther end of the route and stand around in the 
freezing weather. If they are not notified, they may be obliged 
to return these same children to their homes, without first being 
properly warmed. Frequently, too, those living nearby are not 
so well prepared as those living at a distance, an so ad infinitum. 

The only rule that can govern here is one of good common 
sense on the part of the parent — a humane consideration for the 
comfort and well-being of his own children. 

Will parents and drivers work together to bring the best 
possible out of a complicated and ugly situation? 



Delinquents. 

Delinquents are made, not born; and if the process is not 
checked we may find an undesirable surplus of this class of 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 65 



pupils in our schools. These vary in mentality from simple 
causes of backward, through sickness or other misfortune, to the 
very border-line of defectiveness. 

To segregate these pupils and thus fasten the stigma of im- 
becility upon them would be unwarranted, unjust and — expen- 
sive. Happily for the majority of them, we feel that a way has 
been found whereby they may become good and useful mem- 
bers of society without forfeiting their birthright. 

These pupils deluded their former teachers to a certain ex- 
tent, and escaped the tasks set for them through a dullness that 
was partially feigned. From the start the gap between them 
and their companions has been constantly widening, until at 
last they have lost nearly all interest in their books, but they 
turn to some form of hand work with genuine relish. 

And right here in this single particular the manual training 
department puts a new power into our hands and fully justifies 
its existence, although this is, by no means, its proper function. 

By making the privilege of shopwork the condition of good 
work along academic lines, we are enabled in most cases to se- 
cure the maximum of application from these boys, and much 
useful knowledge is thereby gained, which otherwise could not 
be imparted. 

In some cases a simple change of teachers has shown good 
results, and the promise of a trip to Boston, on the evidence of 
good work, and a word of commendation from the teacher, has 
been very encouraging to them. Much credit is due to the in- 
dustrious and faithful teacher at the head of this department. 
He is building better than he realizes. 

To anyone interested in the uplift of the unfortunate, who 
realizes the possible emptiness of such lives, the prospect is in- 
deed very hopeful. I feel that, at last, we have a partial solution 
of this very serious problem and record this belief with a great 
deal of pleasure and gratitude. 



66 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Budget for 1917. 



General Expenses 


$ 3215. 


Teachers' Salaries 


26000. 


Text Books and Supplies 


2900. 


Transportation 


2000. 


Janitors' Service 


2250. 


Fuel and Light 


3500. 


Buildings and Grounds 


1960. 


Furniture and Furnishings 


525. 


Diplomas 


150. 


Insurance 


300. 


Other Expenses 


200. 



Total 



$43000. 



It is understood that the above total represents the gross 
amount asked for. The department will turn into the town 

treasurv about $3500., which when deducted from the gross 
will leave a balance of $39500. to be raised directly by taxa- 
tion. 



Gifts and Acknowledgments. 



We are pleased to acknowledge the receipt of a complete 
set of Ellis's Histories, from Mr. J. A. Huckins. This is a very 
fine set of books consisting of eight volumes, and is a very val- 
uable addition to our reference library. 

This acknowledgment comes quite late and Mr. Huckins is 
to be commended for his patience as well as for his very val- 
uable gift. 

In this connection, too, we acknowledge the gift of one 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 67 



thousand rulers and several beautiful calendars by Mr. John W. 
Goodhue. 

Mr. Arthur C. Glover has procured and presented a fine 
picture of one of the Cunard Steamship Company's largest 
ocean liners for the benefit of the class in commercial geogra- 
phy. 

Acknowledgments should also be made to the Woman's 
Club, not only for its substantial money gifts, but also for the in- 
tense interest which it has always manifested in the various ac- 
tivities of our schools. For some years the school garden has 
been cared for by this organization, and it has expressed the de- 
sire that another attempt be made to have this project estab- 
lished upon a sound and successful basis. The least we can do 
will be to renew our efforts toward bringing this part of our 
school work up to the desired standard. 

We wish also to acknowledge the generous contribution 
towards the purchase of a stereopticon lantern. This we feel 
is another step in the right direction, and we anticipate that 
much benefit will be derived therefrom. 

Lastly, I wish to thank the School Committee and the whole 
corps of teachers for their continued support. Nor would I be 
unmindful of the prompt and efficient service rendered by the 
Board of Health in preventing epidemics from getting a foot- 
hold in our schools, The police also have assisted the Attend- 
ance Officer in no small degree, and our very satisfactory at- 
tendance is due largely to their united efforts. To all or these, 
and to the parents, I wish to tender my heartfelt thanks. And I 
earnestly desire that my work among you may always be found 
worthy of your continued support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH I. HORTON, 

Superintendent of Schools. 



68 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL. 



To the Superintendent of Schools, 

Ipswich, Mass. 
Dear Sir: — 

Before reporting the -work -which we have tried to 
accomplish in the Junior Hiprh School this year, it would be wise 
to state briefly how and why this reorganization of our schools 
has come about. 

The United States Bureau of Education defines the scnool 
as "an organization of grades 7 to 9 (first year of hiorh school), 
or 7 and 8 to provide by various means for individual differ- 
ences, especially by an earlier introduction of prevocational 
work and of subiects usual ly taught in the high school." 

There are more than a hundred such systems now in the 
country. To indicate wfmt prominent educators think of its fu- 
ture, it might be noted that former Commissioner Snedden of 
Massachusetts predicted 1 00 junior high schools in our state 
within four years, which means an increase of some tenfold. 

The introduction of this system involves in main the follow- 
ing: 

1 . A rather complete reorganization of the subject matter 
to be taught, especially within the 7th and 8th grades. 

2. Provisions for differentiated curricula, beginning with 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 69 



the seventh grade. 

3. Provisions for some individual freedom of election of 
courses on the part of the pupils as early as the seventh grade. 

4. Departmental teaching, beginning with the seventh 
grade. 

5. Promotion by subject. 

The first six grades are considered sufficient for the com- 
mon foundations of an active life in a democracy like ours. 
Then at the age of adolescence the gradual introduction of op- 
tional studies through different courses naturally results in a 
better preparation and a better "testing out" for a vocation or 
for further work in the senior high school. Foreign languages, 
taught in the informal, conversational methods, prevocational 
work in various manual branches, or some kind of commercial 
training may be elected by the pupil under the guidance of the 
parents and teachers. 

The advantages of departmental training are obvious, and 
this custom has been followed for years in many schools of the 
first rank. A teacher can teach her few specialties far better 
than she can teach all subjects; a pupil gains much in the 
broadening contact with several teachers. The promotion of 
children in the upper grades by subject on their merits in each 
subject is educationally wise. The interest and the effort of the 
pupil are sapped when he is obliged to repeat a whole year's 
work in all subjects because he fails in one or two. Flexibility 
and adjustment to the individual differences — two aims of the 
junior high school movement — attain much greater success when 
promotion by subject is the rule. 

There are, in summary, four major claims made for the 
junior high school: First, as has been discussed, that it pro- 
vides better for individual differences; second, that it makes 
easier the transition to the high school; third, that it decreases 
the number of pupils eliminated from the school system, and 



70 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



fourth, that it furnishes an opportunity for various reforms in 
instruction. 

We have here in Ipswich to a greater or lesser extent intro- 
duced all of these five main essentials of a junior high school. 
In the first place considerable reorganization of our subject 
matter has been made especially in the seventh and eighth 
grade. We have paid especial attention to the Arithmetic and 
English work aiming to bring this as close to the actual needs 
of the outside world as possible. 

In the second place we have introduced four courses in the 
junior high school distinguished only by one elective study in 
each. That is about five-sixths of the work is the same for all, 
This includes Arithmetic, English, United States History, Geog- 
raphy, Manual Training or Domestic Science, Music, Drawing, 
and the essentials of Hygiene. In the other one-sixth of the 

time the pupil has choice of work in elementary commercial 
studies, Latin and advanced Manual or Domestic Arts. 

The commercial work consists of considerable practice in 
making out the ordinary forms used in business — checks, bills, 
notes, drafts, simple casfi book, journal and ledger accounts, etc. 
The pupil is also given especial drill in penmanship and busi- 
ness letters. This course is intended for pupils who are plan- 
ning to enter the commercial course in the High School or to 
leave school for business occupations or for those who want to 
know something about business in general. Latin is offered 

to pupils who are intending to finish high and go to Normal 
School or college. The work is taken up in a very informal way 
with much of the conversational method and special emphasis 
on the relation between Latin and practical life, — derivatives, 
abbreviations, literature, art, music, science, etc. The manual 

arts elective gives the boys an opportunity of specializing in 
work with hand tools and machinery, repairing, painting, var- 
nishing, etc. This is intended for boys who are interested in 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 71 



this kind of work and want to take a similar course in the high 
school or an industrial school. The domestic arts course gives 
the girls a similar opportunity. They take up advanced work 
in sewing and cooking, make a study of the life history of foods 
and textiles and of the management of the home. It is not our 
intention to force a pupil to remain in any given course longer 
than a year. If he wishes to change we consider the junior high 
school as a kind of testing out place where the pupil can have 
an opportunity to find himself for his future life work. 

The fourth essential of the Junior high school was intro- 
duced from the very first, "departmental teaching." This has 
been very successful and its advantages are mentioned above. 
Promotion by subject is being gradually developed. Last year 
promotion bv subject in Arithmetic and English was in effect 
in the junior high school. This year it probably will be extend- 
ed further to other subjects and to lower classes. 

A report of the class average of the first year pupils in the 
high school this year shows considerable gain by our junior 
high school graduates. The average of the freshman for the 

first quarter last year was 72 per cent., and for this year's fresh- 
man class 78 per cent. Considering the average number of 
studies being taken by a pupil as four, and counting the number 
of Ipswich pupils in this year's freshman class as 39, it is seen 
that the aggregate gain in all studies is 396 per cent. This is 
the first class graduated from the junior high school. This im- 
provement in scholarship is due, I believe, partly to depart- 
mental teaching in the eighth grade, partly to promotion by 

subject and largely to the fact that we. have enforced fair rules 
for promotion. 

Let me suggest that all parents and friends visit our school 
while it is at work and see for themselves just what we are trying 
to do. Briefly we are aiming for better teachers and better students. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RALPH W. WESTCOTT. 



72 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



DOMESTIC SCIENCE DEPARTMENT. 



To the Superintendent of Schools, 

Ipswich, Mass. 
Dear Sir: — 

The general aim of this department has been to 
keep the needs and the requirements of the average American 
family constantly in view. It may be said to be threefold: First 
to give the girls some knowledge of food materials; second, to 
teach them to prepare foods; third, to instruct them in the art 
of homemaking and housekeeping. 

The girls are taught about various foodstuffs as purchased, 
with regard to their origin and preparation for market. The ob- 
ject of this is to make the pupil's buying more intelligent and 
economical. Especially at this time when the cost of living is 

so high, great stress is laid upon economy. 

The study of the preparation of food covers much ground. 
First, the reasons for cooking food must be understood, and 
then the various methods of cooking are taught with regard to 
the composition of the material being cooked, and the desired 
result. Just enough work along the line of so called luxuries 

and delicacies has been permitted to give these prospective 
housekeepers' confidence in their own ability to prepare food 
for the sick or for entertainment as the occasion might demand. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 73 



But the most emphasis has been given to plain cooking of the 
substantial classes of food such as should have a place upon the 
workingman's table Here, too, an effort has been made to pre- 
vent waste and to utilize in a new form what remained from 
the meals of the preceding day. 

The actual cooking of certain articles of food that require 
much time has been omitted in some classes, although the 
theory and the process has been explained and the pupils are 
encouraged to try these out at home. The cooking of meats 

has to be restricted because of the high costs, and the cooking 
of the tender, expensive cuts is only explained, while the making 
of stews and soups and other means of cooking inexpensive 
cuts is practiced as much as possible. 

Whenever it is possible, directions or rules are made gen- 
eral, thus inducing the pupils to associate one class of foods 
with another. For example, when cereals are cooked, general 
rules for cooking them are given, which will enable a girl to 
cook oatmeal or hominy at home, even though the practice 
work in class may have been to prepare Cream of Wheat. 

Comparison of various commercial products is made from 
an economical standpoint. For example, if three or four fats 
are under consideration, they will all be tried in making pie 
crust or in deep fat frying and by comparing results the class 
may decide which fat is the best and most economical. 

Instruction in housekeeping is correlated with that of the 
preparation of food. The pupils must acquire habits of neat- 

ness and efficiency while they are practicing cooking and house- 
keeping. Dishwashing, cleaning, sweeping, fire-building, in fact 
the care of all parts of a household equipment have their place 
in each lesson. Nothing which tends to beautify the home 

should be overlooked in this course. 

Mr. Arthur Walton has kindly consented to give the classes 
some demonstration work in room papering. 



74 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



One class from both the seventh and eighth grades have 
special wor& in this course, and their work can include many 
things which the shorter courses cannot cover. In the fall a 

great deal of canning and preserving is done, and the products 
have been placed on sale by local dealers. Over ten dollars 

was netted from these sales, which will be turned in to the 
school department. Another year we hope to realize even 
more from these sales. Many persons are already deriving no 
small part of their income from this sort of work, and if our pu- 
pils can be taught to do likewise this department will be made 
all the more valuable to this community. 

The study of household pests with methods of avoid- 
ing and destroying them is taken up; and later on we 
hope to have an illustrated lecture on the subject by one of 
the faculty of the Essex County Agricultural School. An- 

nouncements will be made, and all who are interested may at- 
tend. 

The work in the high school is along the same lines as that 
of the grades, but is somewhat more advanced. The dishes pre- 
pared are a little more difficult, and simple menus are arranged 
and carried out. 

We may say in conclusion that a girl having taken 
all the work offered in the course should be able to keep home 
welli 

Respectfully submitted, 

ELIZABETH NUTTER. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 75 



THE SEWING DEPARTiMENT. 



To the Superintendent of Schools, 

Ipswich, Mass. 
Dear Sir: — 

The -work of the sewing classes is planned to give 
the girls a practical understanding of plain sewing and simple 
garment making. The work is begun in the fifth grade. Here 
all the fundamental stitches are taught, but they are taught on 
useful articles rather than on sample pieces, and the idea of 
making useful things is held throughout the course. The first 

article, however, is planned with the idea of having the children 
finish something quickly to encourage them, and it is a bean or 
rice bag. When this is finished they may have their choice of 
the following articles: sewing bag, school bag, duster bag and 
sleeve bib. Every article which is begun must be finished be- 
fore another may be started, but when these articles are com- 
plete a petticoat or apron may be made. 

The pupils of the sixth grade begin garment making and 
they learn to use simple commercial patterns. They may make 
a night gown, apron, princess slip or kimona. The work here 
is all by hand, and the chief problem is to acquire speed and to 
make the stitches more perfect. Besides the manual work, va- 
rious material suitable for underwear are examined, and 



76 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



comparison is made between ready made and home made 
clothing with regard to durability and effectiveness. The ob- 

ject of the garment makers' union and the designating label is 
explained. 

In the seventh grade the use of the sewing machine is a 
special problem. The puoils learn about the mechanism of the 
machine and how to care ^or it, as well as how to use it. The 
work of this class is to make the outfit to be worn in the cook- 
ing class, which consists of apron, cap, towel and holder. Much 
of this work is done by hand, but the long seams are stitched. 

There is a special class in the seventh grade that has more 
work, and the members of it do a great deal of extra work, 
making more underwear, blouses, etc. They also make an ex- 
tensive study of textiles, keeping notebooks. Each textile fibre 
is studied, and the girls are taught to distinguish imitations and 
adulterations in materials. 

The work of the eighth grade and high school is of a some- 
what broader scope, and quite a variety of garments is made, 
from underwear to dresses, waists, skirts, middy blouses and 
smocks. 

Many of the children enjoy making something for someone 
else, and this spirit of giving is encouraged especially at Christ- 
mas time, when a list of useful articles is suggested to the chil- 
dren, and much pretty work of a practical kind is done. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ELIZABETH NUTTER. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 77 



MANUAL TRAINING DEPARTMENT. 



To the Superintendent of Schools, 

Ipswich, Mass. 
Dear Sir: — 

It is with pleasure that I present my fifth annual 
report of the Manual Training work in the Ipswich public 
schools. 

Manual Training now fills an important place in our school 
system, and the public is coming more and more to realize and 
appreciate its worth. 

The fact that our boys so gladly avail themselves of the 
privilege offered by this department, and the interest and pride 
in their work, is ample proof of its value. 

This year a course has been planned especially to meet the 
needs of the junior high school boys, many of whom will leave 
school at the close of the year. This includes, besides a gener- 
al review of previous work, considerable practice with the ma- 
chines. They come every day in one hour periods and are 
turning out some excellent work and gaining some knowledge 
of machine operations. 

We are making a small cabinet, after which we shall review 
the different kinds of joints in practical ways. Much time is 

being given to talks on the measurement of lumber, the use and 
purchase of nails and hardware. 

Such practical work as placing hinges on doors and putting 
in locks and other work about buildings might well be intro- 



78 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



duced into the work of this class. 

The w^ork in the grades is similar to that of previous years. 
Beginning with the fifth grade the work is carefully planned to 
lead up step by step — beginning with the simple models — the 
aim always being not only to interest the boy in the use of tools 
but to create in him a desire to make something worth while. 

Much care is used in the choice of models. From the low- 
est to the highest grades, these are always such articles as will 
appeal to them as something that can be used. 

In addition to the regular Manual Training course, 1 50 
desks have been renovated and resurfaced, at the small cost of 
6 1-2 cents each. This and the making of shelves, bookracks. 
bulletin boards, etc., has been of the greatest value, as in this 
way the boys are making a practical application of their knowl- 
edge. 

The high school boys are doing some good work along 
much the same lines as the junior high, but they, especially the 
afternoon class, have many other interests which prevent their 
devoting much time to the work. 

The importance of mechanical drawing has not been over- 
looked and this will be developed more as time goes on. This 
and the need of adding a band saw and turning lathe to our 
equipment, are the matters to which it seems to me we must 
now give our attention. 

Some of our boys are soon to leave us for work in the Gen- 
eral Electric and United Shoe Companies. With these machines 
we can help these and others mechanically inclined to have at 
least a small amount of knowledge that will be of benefit to 
them. But whatever work our boys may engage in, this train, 
ing of the hands, besides being of practical worth to them will 
tend to give them a wholesome and exalted idea of manual labor. 
Respectfully submitted, 

W. W. LUNT. 






IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 79 



THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT. 



To the Superintendent of Schools, 

Ipswich, Mass. 
Dear Sir: — 

In submitting to you my report of the music in the 
Ipswich Public Schools for the past year, I would like to present 
it in two parts: First, a review of the work accomplished during 
the last two months, including a brief outline of the course of 
study: and second, a proposal of the new work which I sincere- 
ly think should be introduced into our present school system. 

I will not at ttiis time attempt to give you the course of 
study in full, since it was published in the Ipswich School Re- 
port a few years ago and has not materially changed. 

Briefly, beginning with grade one, where we start our chil- 
dren in music by the singing of rote songs, we endeavor to lead 
them, through the singing of exercises, songs and voice training, 
to that appreciation of good music and the rendering of it, 
which culminates in the High School. Great attention is given 
to vocal drills, which are indispensible to the child, to individ- 
ual work and to the proper musical interpretation of songs. 
And, with the able assistance of the teachers, who have so 
heartily and untiringly aided me, I feel safe in claiming that the 
music in our grades ranks far above the average. 



80 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Approximately a year ago, I introduced a system which has 
far exceeded my expectations as to the results obtained by the 
use or it. Formerly, when the supervisor visited the class rooin, 
he immediately took charge of the children, while the guade 
teacher listened to the explanation and watched the demonstra- 
tion of the work for the following week. No teacher, however 
capable, can always grasp the various points in a supervisor's 
lesson. In order that I could feel sure that the pupils benefited 
to the greatest possible extent by my teaching, and realizing that 
the regular teacher met the class every day and I only once 
each week, I insisted that she take the class while I was in the 
room and, instead of criticising the children, I offered my sug- 
gestions to her. Of course, any new principle is always first 
presented by the supervisor and then exemplified the following 
week by the grade teacher. The same holds true in the case of 
a new teacher who may never have taught music in the public 
schools. While this course of action is rather difficult at first, 

I think you will find the teachers all admit that, under the pres- 
ent system, their classes have made more progress this year than 
ever before. 

The drill in the grades is hard, and to the conscientious su- 
pervisor who is teaching the greatest of all the arts, not enough 
encouragement is given him by the people of the community in 
which he teaches, Very, very few of our townspeople realize 
the amount of work that is being accomplished in music, and 
fewer still even take the opportunity to find out. I should gladly 
welcome to our class rooms, at any time, any and all who wish 
to see the methods we teach and the results we are obtaining. 
Especially is it the duty of every parent to do this, and the more 
frequent visiting of schools would also act as an incentive for 
better work to the children. 

I have given you, very briefly it is true, an outline of our 
manner of teaching and the results attained by it. Now may I 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 81 



suggest a few changes, which I consider as necessary, if we wish 
the child to receive some reward for his hard labor in the 
grades. 

First — that a stated amount of time be devoted to chorus 
singing each morning in the High School. I would suggest a 

period of not less than twenty minutes. 

Of what particular advantage is one singing lesson a week 
to High Schools? Why, after singing in school every day for at 
least eight years, should a High School student be allowed but 
one lesson each week? I suppose the inevitable answer will be 
— no time. Why? Haven't you five hours of study each day? 
Isn't music of sufficient importance to devote one-fifteenth part 
of that school day to the chorus? Are not our greatest educa- 
tors admitting music to be one of the most important studies in 
the school curriculum, more important, indeed, than the major- 
ity? Is it not true that, after the singing lesson, the child is ca- 
pable of better work than before? If these things are not so, 
why not abolish music altogether? I certainly cannot plead too 
too strongly for daily music in the High School. 

Second — That credit of a stated number of points be al- 
lowed each pupil for outside music study. 

How many of our High School boys and girls are studying 
the voice? The piano? The violin? Or any other instrument? 
Not as many by more than half as there should be. Why? 
Again the answer — no time. It has been my own personal ex- 
perience, and I have absolute proof of that of countless other 
teachers, that boys and girls do not study music outside of 
school because their high school studies occupy so much of 
their time. The pupils admit it. Their parents confirm their 
statements. Is there any logical reason why a child should not 
be allowed to study some musical instrument if he so desires? 
And yet, you are prohibiting this very thing. If credit were 

given, the pupil to be judged by some competent authority, isn't 



£2 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



it fair to assume that the Town of Ipswich must benefit in a few 
years, even as the child himself? Again I urge that you act 

upon this matter. 

Third — that credit be given to those who participate in 
either the boys' or girls' glee clubs, as well as the High School 
chorus. 

If a pupil takes interest enough in his school to freely give 
his time for rehearsing, why shouldn't the school reciprocate 
by giving him credit for the same? I understand that, being 

compulsory, the members of the chorus are credited with one 
point. Why not those in the Glee Clubs, which is not compul- 
sory? 

Fourth — that one extra day each week be given the super- 
visor for work in the High School to include the teaching of Har- 
mony, Theory, Sight Singing and Music Appreciation. 

It is hardly unnecessary for me to point out the advantages 
of this suggestion. There are many of the students who could 
prepare for a musical education by the training secured from 
their studies. Also, they could prepare for music at college. 

Of course you realize that the future of the music in the town 
of Ipswich rests absolutely with our High School scholars. No 
one can get too much music. That is impossible. In this town 
of over one thousand children, music practically stops at the 
end of the eighth grade. How many High School students are 
in our church choirs? In our community chorus? Why not 

give them a chance? All of the four subjects mentioned, es- 

pecially that of sight singing, are of the utmost importance. 

Fifth — that a High School and Junior High School concert 
be given each year by the respective grades. 

Plans are already under way, whereby we intend to give 
both of these concerts before graduation this year. Why not 

have it understood by the pupils that the arrangement is to be 
permanent? 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 83 



In regard to the High School chorus on Thursday morn- 
ings, I would like to extend an invitation to any person in the 
town who is interested in music, to come to Manning Hall at 
eight-thirty and join us in our work. Not only would it be ben- 
eficial to the pupils, but perhaps instructive and interesting to 
those who care to avail themselves of the opportunity. Might I 
ask you to spread the invitation? 

Sixth — that a new piano be purchased for the High School. 
It will be impossible to continue the work with the present col- 
lection of tin and wood that out of courtesy to the school is 
called a piano. A second-hand instrument could be purchased 
for a small expenditure, and if we are to continue the music, 
something must be done immediately. 

I would also recommend the starting of an orchestra and a 
boys' quartette. No high school of importance is without 

them. 

May I suggest that you bring these recommendations be- 
fore your committee at the earliest possible moment; and I 
would further suggest that, if you wish to put the High School 
on a par with others, that these recommendations be carried 
out. 

I wish to thank you for your very kind assistance, assuring 
you that I shall continue the work already started and endeavor 
to show you even more progress during the coming year. 

Sincerely yours, 

ARTHUR HAROLD TOZER. 



84 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



THE DRAWING DEPARTMENT. 



To the Superintendent of Schools, 

Ipswich, Mass. 
Dear Sir: — 

The work of the free hand drawing department in the 
schools for the year 1916 has been carried along on nearly the 
same basis as it was during the preceding year. Owing to the 
fact that the amount of time and interest given to this work has 
been increased, both the curriculum and the scope have been 
perceptibly broadened. 

Tremendous effort is being made to teach the pupil appre- 
ciation and good taste. 

During this year a practically new course in mechanical 
drawing has been established. Never before has enough 

thought been given to this subject to make it a factor here in 
our school system. Great results are expected from this 

course. It is the desire of the supervisor that this subject 
may be correlated very closely with the manual training. In 

that way it will give the boys an opportunity to create original 
design, and to finish an integral problem. 

In the high school the number of students taking drawing 
has been increased nearly 1 00 per cent, over the number a 
year ago. In the free hand department courses have been 






IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 85 



planned in design, interior decoration, color, composition and 
costume. In the mechanical department it is expected that the 
boy at the end of the fourth year will be acquainted with archi- 
tectural construction and be able to design machine drafts of 
the most intricate form. These courses have been planned with 
the greatest consideration, the most serious attention being given 
to the students' welfare in every particular. 

The supervisor of drawing and the superintendent of 
schools extend a most cordial invitation to any person who de- 
sires to enter any of these classes. 

Respectfully submitted, 
FRANKLIN BUTLER MITCHELL, 

Supervisor of Drawing. 



THE EVENING SCHOOL. 



To the Superintendent of Schools, 

Ipswich, Mass. 
Dear Sir: — 

The work of the evening school for this season started the 
first week in November. Our work has been among three main 
classes of people, non-English-speaking persons, boys over four- 
teen years of age from fourth to eighth grade ability who have 
left day school, and those taking commercial subjects. There 
have been about 65 foreign women and 20 foreign men in reg- 
ular attendance. Most of these cannot read or talk English at 
all when they enter. There has been a class of about 20 women 



86 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



reading advanced work of from 3rd to 8th grade difficulty. All 
illiterates between 14 and 21 are, of course, required by the law 
of the state to attend. Some 18 boys all told, from 14 to 17 
years of age, have been coming to evening school for instruction 
in English and arithmetic. The attendance here has been some- 
what irregular. This is the first year that an attempt has been 
made to reach this class, and it is hoped that another year re- 
newed effort may be made to meet the needs of boys and girls 
who realize that they have left school too soon and wish to go 
farther in their education. We have been teaching shorthand, 
typewriting, business arithmetic, penmanship and spelling, and 
bookkeeping in the commercial sections. About 25 have been 
in regular attendance in this division. We are planning to give 
certificates of credit to each one who completes the season in 
regular attendance and does faithful work. This will be of act- 
ual practical benefit to the holders when they are looking for 
promotion or new positions. Request have also been made for 
recommendations to employers. Teachers and principal are al- 
ways glad to recommend industrious students. An attempt was 
made to interest foreign men in a naturalization class without 
much success. The total enrollment since November 1 in all 
departments has been 22 1 . This is quite large, but the continual 
shifting of foreigners from one town to another, and the lack of 
a steadfast earnestness for regularity in attendance on the part 
of native citizens, has cut the average attendance down to about 
115. In a town like Ipswich, -where a large majority of the res- 
idents are foreigners, there should be a large future for the 
evening school, if thoughtfully considered and supported. The 
young men and women just out of the day schools of the town, 
should, for their own sakes, vigorously support the commercial 
courses which are being offered to them. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RALPH W. WESTCOTT. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 87 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDiCAL INSPECTION & HYGIENE. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL PHYSICIAN. 



To the Superintendent of Schools, 

Ipswich, Mass. 
Dear Sir: — 

The work done under this heading has been followed along 
lines adopted several years ago. It consists of an examination 
of each pupil and the findings of the examinations are recorded 
upon individual cards. Any pupil found not to be up to a good 
health standard, or any pupil suffering from certain physical de- 
fects, is followed up by the school nurse. This leads to a check- 
ing process with these pupils, and as a result these defects are 
corrected in a good percentage of the cases. The report of the 
school nurse which follows refers to this matter more in detail. 

> The hygienic and sanitary condition of most of our buildings 
is good. Three of the older buildings, however, need sanitary 
plumbing to replace the old out-buildings now in use. It is ex- 
pected that at least one of these buildings will be remedied this 
year. All of them ought to be. 

The general health of the pupils has been good. Not a large 
number have been kept out of school because of contagious 
disease when the schools were in session. Any loss of time to 
the pupils because the schools were not in session, was because 
of conditions outside the town, and beyond the control of the 
school authorities. 



88 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Additional equipment which has been recommended by the 
Superintendent and School Committee will add greatly to the ef- 
ficiency of the important work that is being done by the School 
Nurse, as well as in the work of the Physician. If the contem- 
plated Dental Clinic is established, this department should be 
able to obtain results that will stand favorable comparison with 
those of any school system in the Commonwealth. 
Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE E. MacARTHUR, 

School Physician. 
Ipswich, February 12, 1917. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL NURSE. 



To the Superintendent of School, 

Ipswich, Mass. 
Dear Sir: — 

The work of the School Nurse consists of assisting 
the Physician in his examinations of the children by recording 
his findings at the time of examination, and tabulating the re- 
sults upon individual cards which are kept on file in the Super- 
intendent's office; also in following up at their homes such 
children as need this supervision because of physical defects. 
Of 900 children examined, 398 were found with some physical 
defect. 1 05 homes were visited in reference to 1 75 children. 

Of 120 children having enlarged tonsils, 24 have been op- 
erated upon, and many have had dental work done. Coburn 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 89 



Home has paid for attention to the teeth of 36 children, and 
the nurses have accompanied children to hospitals for opera- 
tion, and also to the dentist. Some small dressings were done 
at the schools. 

In their visits to the homes the nurses have been most cor- 
dially received by the parents, and a spirit of co-operation has 
been shown which promises well for a larger development of 
the work in the future. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARTHA J. STEWART, 



School Nurse. 



Ipswich, February 12, 1917. 



REPORT OF THE ATTENDANCE OFFICER. 



To the Superintendent of School, 

Ipswich, Mass. 
Dear Sir: — 

I herewith submit my report for the period from Sep- 
tember 13, 1 9 1 6, to January 1 , 1917. 

Seventy-seven cases of absences have been investigated 
during that time, most of which were found to have some valid 
excuse. Three were unable to go to school on account of not 
having proper clothing, one was taught in private school, three 
w re illegally held at home and two illegally employed. 



90 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



The fear of infantile paralysis was the cause of some 
parents keeping their children at home the first part of the year 
and sickness of pupils occasioned the greater number of cases. 
Sixteen were returned to school and only in one case was it 
necessary to bring the child before the court. 

The earlier part of the school year being warm and pleas- 
ant was an inducement for some to stay away and enjoy the 
beauties of nature, but after it was rather forcibly impressed 
upon their minds that it was better for them to attend school 
regularly, it is gratifying to state that the number of absences 
has decreased greatly. 

Today, January 1 9, only five absences were reported from 
a registration of 975. 

In addition to the day schools 1 have visited the Ipswich 
Mills and Burke's factory several times in reference to the com- 
pulsory attendance to the evening school which has been added 
to the duties of the Attendance Officer this year. 
Yours very truly, 

GEORGE W. TOZER, 

Attendance Officer. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 91 



LIST OF TEACHERS. 



John P. Marston High School 

Charles Goodwin 

Franklin Mitchell (Drawing) 

Mildred Emerson 

Amy Lindsey 

Gladys MacLay 

Adele Mathey 

Herbert W. Pickup 

Gwendolyn Taggart 

Mary A. Preble 

Ralph Westcott Winthrop School 

William Murphy 

Elizabeth Stolba 

Katherine Sullivan 

Isabelle Arthur 

Eva Willcomb 

Elizabeth Nutter (Domestic Science) 

Alice Dinneen 

Winfield W. Lunt (Manual Training) 

Martina O'Neil 

Elsie C. Green 

Nellie T. Sullivan Burley School 

Grace Higgins 

Hazel Weare 

Kathleen Broderick 

Carrie Bowman Portable School 



92 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Alice Maguire 
Lydia Harris 

Annie P. Wade 
Lucy Ardel Kimball 

Winifred Fleming 
Augusta Appleton 

Grace Moulton 

Arthur Tozer 

Esther L. Tenney 

Cora Jewett 

Joseph I. Horton 



Payne School 
<< <( 

Dennison School 

it (< 

Cogswell School 

Wainwright 

Music 

Linebrook 

Grape Island 

Superintendent 



CLASS OF 1916. 



Edna J. Bailey 
Lincoln E. Hudgens 
Edith H. Joyce 
Harold A. Lord 
Ruth F. Mehaffey 
Clara M. Millard 
Gertrude R. Sheppard 
Sigourney Todd 



Susie S. Buzzell 

Francis B. Jewett 
Helen B. Kelley 
Mary K. Matheson 



Winfield J. Haley 

Beatrice Johnson 

Carl L. Lange 

Caroline E. Mayes 

Marjorie G. Morris 



Annie M. MacDonald 

Myron F. Nason Rebecca S. Robinson 

Maud L. Sheppard 
Everett R. Tucker 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 93 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



We have taken these tables of vital statistics from copies 
furnished us by our Town Clerk, Mr. Charles W. Bamford. In 
every case persons born in any of the British Provinces, Ire- 
land, Scotland or Wales have been excluded. As an indica- 
tion of the drift of our school population these figures may pos- 
sess some interest. 



Births. 



Foreign Foreign 

Year Number Fathers Mothers 

57 59 

62 62 

75 75 

55 57 

99 100 



In 1916, of 168 births, 67 fathers were mill operatives, 
23 were laborers, 1 1 teamsters, 7 machinists, 5 heel cut- 
ters, and 7 farmers. 



1912 


159 


1913 


146 


1914 


144 


1915 


118 


1916 


168 



94 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



SCHOOL CALENDAR FOR 1917. 



B 



egms 



CI 



oses 



Winter Term 
Spring Term 
Summer Term 
Fall Term 



January 2 

February 26 

May 7 

September 1 



February 1 6 

April 27 

June 29 

December 2 1 



Holidays. 



Every Saturday; Columbus Day, October 12; Wednesday 
Afternoon, Thursday and Friday of Thanksgiving Week; Feb- 
ruary 22; April 1 9; Memorial Day; June 1 7; and Good 
Friday. 



No School Signals. 



Two blasts at 7:30 — no schools. 

Two blasts at 8:00 — no school for first six grades. 

Two blasts at 1 1 :00 — no afternoon sessions. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 95 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



To the Citizens of Ipswich: — 

I submit the Annual Report of the 
Manning School, R. H. Manning, Heard and Treadwell Funds, 
as compiled from the books of their respective Treasurers. 
I have found receipts for all bills paid. 

I have examined the various Stocks and Bonds of which 
these various funds are composed, and find them to agree with 
the report submitted. 

ARTHUR H. WALTON, 

Auditor. 
February 3, 1917. 



96 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



MANNING SCHOOL FUND. 



Receipts 
Cash on hand February 1,1916 $ 1 35 1 09 

Income from investments 1 034 00 

2385 09 



Expenditures 

Salaries $ 1 50 00 

Taxes, water, insurance and miscellaneous expenses 863 06 

Cash on hand February 1,1917 1 372 03 

2385 09 



Securities Comprising Manning School Fund. 



12 1000 4 p.c. Peoria & Eastern Istmtg. bonds $12,000 

5 " National R. Mexico " " " 5,000 

2 " 5 p.c. N. E. Brick Co. bonds 2,000 

1 " Passaic Steel Co. " 1,000 

Invested in Master's House 7,000 

" " Colonial Building 18,000 

45,000 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 97 



R. H. MANNING FUND. 



Receipts 
Income $448 12 



Securities Comprising R. H. Manning Fund. 

Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank $4763 94 

3 1000 5 per cent. Chicago & Northern Mich, bonds 3000 00 

4 1 000 5 per cent. Passaic Steel Co bonds 4000 00 

11,763 94 






98 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



HEARD FUND OF IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Income 

Balance on hand January 1,1916 $ 603 25 

Received from investments 923 56 

Received from Treadwell Fund 800 00 

2326 81 

Expenditures 

Salaries $1144 85 

Insurance and miscellaneous expense 829 27 

Balance January 1,1917 352 69 

2326 81 



Securities Comprising Heard Fund. 



33 shares B & L R preferred stock 

35 shares B & M R 

1 shares Fitchburg R preferred stock 

1 C B & O R 3 1-2 per cent bond 

1 United Electric & Power bond 

3 Northern Pac Great Northern 4 per cent bond 

1 Aurora Elgin & Chicago bond 

3 Quincy Gas & Electric bonds 

1 Waterloo Cedar Falls & Northern bond 

Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank 



$5846 00 


1470 00 


900 00 


945 00 


950 00 


2830 00 


1000 00 


3000 00 


1000 00 


208 24 



8,149 24 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



99 



TREADWELL FUND. 



Receipts 
Cash on hand January 1 , 1916 
Received from investments 



$1472 68 
1560 53 

2933 21 



Expenditures 
Salaries 

Miscellaneous expenses 
Paid Heard Fund 
Balance on hand January 1 , 1917 



50 00 

1036 58 

1 600 00 

246 63 

2933 21 



Securities Comprising Treadweli Fund. 



50 shares Fitchburg R preferred stock 

30 shares Old Colony R 

25 shares B & P R 

25 shares M Central 

25 shares Vt & Mass. R " 

25 shares B & A R 



$4500 00 
5215 00 
6300 00 
3080 00 
3460 00 
3990 00 



100 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



1 County Commanche, Kansas, 6 per cent, bond 

1 City of Fostoria, Ohio, 4 per cent, bond 

1 American Tel & Tel Co 4 per cent, bond 

1 Central Branch R. 4 per cent, bond 

1 Aurora, Elgin & Chicago R 5 per cent, bond 

1 Kansas Gas & Electric 5 per cent, bond 

1 Quincy Gas & Electric Heating 5 per cent, bond 

1 Waterloo, Cedar Falls & Northern bond 

Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank 

36,399 74 



1000 00 


530 00 


1000 00 


975 00 


1000 00 


1 000 00 


950 00 


1000 00 


2399 74 



5WICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



BURLEY EDUCATION FUND; 



The Trustees of the Burley Education Fund in Ipswich pre- 
sent this their Ninety-first Annual Report. 

The Funds in their hands are as follows: 

1 5 shares of common stock B&MRR $ 675 00 

3 notes of Town of Ipswich, $700. each 2 I 00 00 

Deposit in Ipswich Savings Bank 3 1 32 17 

Caldwell Fund in Ipswich Savings Bank 1021 27 

Deposit in Salem Savings Bank 793 24 

Deposit in Salem Five Cents Savings Bank 1827 71 

9549 39 

Income since the last Report has been as follows: 

Interest on Town notes $1 12 00 

Dividends from Ipswich Savings Bank 120 02 

Caldwell Fund " 42 58 

Salem Savings Bank 23 24 

Salem Five Cents Savings Bank 41 60 

339 44 
Expenditures have been as follows: 
Paid Committee of Minority Stockholders B&MRR $ 1 5 00 
Paid School Com. for furniture at Winthrop School 150 00 

FRANK T. GOODHUE 
GEORGE W. TOZER 
JOSEPH T. MORTON 
JOHN W. NOURSE 

Trustees. 



I certify that I have examined the report of the Treasurer 
of the Burley Education Fund and find it correct and to agree 
with the report submitted. ARTHUR H. WALTON, Auditor. 



102 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



BROWN SCHOOL FUND. 



The Trustees of the Brown School Fund present the fol- 
lowing seport for the year 1916: 

The funds are as follows 
Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank $1372 62 

" Salem Five Cents Savings Bank * 1099 10 

2471 72 

Income since last report 
Dividends from Ipswich Savings Bank $53 76 

Dividend from Salem Five Cents Savings Bank 42 66 

96 42 

Expenditures for the year 
Transportation of the small children of the Candlewood 

District to and from the schools in the town center $90 00 

6 42 
Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES G. BROWN 
A. STORY BROWN 
BENJAMIN R. HORTON 

Trustees 



I certify that I have examined the report of the Treasurer of 
the Brown School Fund and find it correct. 

ARTHUR H. WALTON, 

Auditor. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 103 



INDEX. 



Organization of School Committee 


Page 3 


School Expenditures — 




General Expense 


4 


Teachers' Salaries 


5 


Text Books and Supplies 


8 


Transportation 


10 


Janitor Service 


11 


Fuel and Light 


11 


Buildings and Grounds 


12 


Furniture and Furnishings 


13 


Rent 


14 


Diplomas and Graduation Exercises 


14 


Insurance 


14 


Other Expenses 


14 


Evening School — 




Teachers' Salaries 


16 


Janitor Service 


17 


Other Expenses 


17 


Report of the School Committee 


18 


Distribution of Pupils 


24 


Roport of the Superintendent 


25 


Needs 


27 


Beginnings 


30 


General Observations 


32 


Our Schools 


34 


Spelling 


39 


Penmanship 


40 


History 


40 


Grammar and Language 


41 


Reading 


43 



10 4 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



The High School 44 

Shall It Be a Preparatory School or Not? 48 

The High School a Civic Center 5 1 

Ranks, Marks and Pomortion 53 

Transportation 56 

School Garden 57 

, Excursions 60 

Penny Savings 62 

Suggestions to Parents 63 

Delinquents 64 

The Budget 66 

Gifts and Acknowledgments 66 

The Junior High School 68 

Domestic Science 72 

The Sewing Department 75 

Manual Training Department 77 

The Music Department 79 

The Drawing Department t 84 

The Evening School 85 

Report of the School Physician 87 

Report of the School Nurse 88 

Report of the Attendance Officer 89 

List of Teachers 91 

Class of 1916 92 

Vital Statistics 93 

School Calendar 94 

Auditor s Report 95 

Manning School Fund 96 

R. H. Manning Fund 97 

Heard Fund 98 

Treadwell Fund 99 

Burley Education Fund 1 1 

Brown School Fund 1 02 



TOWN OF IPSWICH. 
TENTH 

ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

ON THE 

APPROPRIATIONS AtfD ARTICLES 
IX THE WARRANT 

FOR THE 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

MARCH 4, 1918. 




IPSWICH, MASS.: 
GEO. A. SCHOFIELD & SON, PRINTERS. 



1918 



FINANCE COMMITTEE REPORT. 



TENTH 

ANNUAL REPORT. 



Ipswich, February 22, 1918. 
To the Citizens of the Town of Ipswich: — 

The Finance Committee has carefully considered the financial 
needs for the maintenance of the various departments of the Town, 
also to provide for the payment of principal and interest due on Bonds 
and Notes for the fiscal year. We have also corjsidered all tke articles 
in the Warrant calling for the appropriation of money. 

In considering the following recommendations, the attention is 
called to the reports of the departments as presented in the Town 
Report which show for what purpose the money appropriated in 1917 
was expended and also recommendations for expenditures in 1918. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE REPORT. 



Recom- 
Department, Appropriated Expended Called For mended 

1917 1917 1918 

Selectmen, $2233 96 $2212 20 $2276 12 $2275 00 

Auditing 
and Accounting" 1450 00 

Treasurer, 
and Collector, Salary, 3453 33 
Clerical assistance, 
Other expense, 



1447 95 


1450 00 


1450 00 


1500 00 


1800 00 


1500 00 


1147 65 


1200 00 


1200 00 


804 48 


685 00 


685 00 



Total, $3452 13 $3685 00 $3385 00 

Assessors, 860 00 840 25 860 00 860 00 

Law Department, 3876 60 3811 60 300 00 300 00 

Town Clerk, 560 00 563 17 568 50 560 00 

Election 

and Registration, 659 35 519 55 575 00 575 00 

Town Hall, 2145 49 2132 91 2180 00 2180 00 

tSate Aid, 2500 00 2061 91 2500 00 2500 00 

Soldiers' Relief, 1511 25 1158 90 1500 00 1500 00 

Police Department. 5732 85 5675 67 4800 00 4800 00 

Fire Department, 6990 40 6798 79 \ 6950 00 6950 00 
For repairs at Hose 2 house, ( 300 00 We re- 
commend that no appropriation be made for this work. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE REPORT, 











Recom- 


Department, Appropriated 


Expended 


Called For 


mended 




1917 


1917 


1918 




Forest Warden, 


115 00 


1C1 44 


100 00 


100 00 


Tree Warden, 


400 00 


341 34 


400 00 


400 00 


Park Department 


350 00 ' 


349 80 


350 00 


350 00 


Weights 
and Measures, 


225 00 


201 68 


260 00 


210 00 


Health Department, 


3583 56 


3514 21 


3500 00 


3500 00 



Highway Dept., ( 19418 44 19712 54 ( 18500 00 

J j Highways 17000 00 

Board of horses, ( 406 33 ( 500 00 snow & ice 

1500 CO 











Recom- 


Department. 


Appropriated 


Expended 


Called For 


mended 




1917 


1917 


1918 




Cemeteries, 


1800 00 




1973 25 




Trust Funds, 


349 75 


2134 52 




1800 00 


Out Poor. 


7741 56 


7425 47 


8000 00 


8000 00 


Town Farm, 


4272 34 


4203 68 


3700 00 


3700 00 



Installation of telephone and service charges, 325 00 We re- 
commend that this matter be postponed until next year. 



Note payment, 12000 00 12000 00 

Interest, 7235 50 7221 57 

Dept. of Education, 43450 00 43235 25 

Special appropriation to install toilets at 
Cogswell School, 
commend no appropriation for this work. 



11100 00 11100 00 

8507 00 8507 00 

47000 00 46500 00 

1500 00 We re- 



FINANCE COMMITTEE REPORT. 



2450 00 


2450 00 


4692 43 


4692,43 


5500 00 


5500 00 


8003 00 


8003 00 



We recommend that the amount received from St. Ry. Tax 
and Excise be included as a part of the sum appropriated for 
maintenance of highways. 

Electric Light Dept., For depreciation, 

Water Dept., For Sinking Fund, 

General Expense, 

Interest, 

(These amounts are to be appropriated but are to be paid 
from the earnings of the department.) 

We recommend an appropriation of $655 54 for unpaid bills to be 
taken from the Excess and Deficiency Fund. 



THE WARRANT. 

Article 2. We recommend that the compensation of Town Officers 
be the same as in 1917. 

Article S. We recommend an appropriation of $250.00 for the ob- 
servance of Memorial Day, 

Article 12. We recommend an appropriation of $3000. for a 
Reserve Fund and that this sum be taken from the Excess and Defic- 
iency Fund. 

Article 14. We recommend that this article be referred to com- 
mittee to investigate the advisability and cost of construction and 
report at an adjournment of the annual meeting. 

Article 15. We recommend an appropriation of $200. for edge- 
stones to be set at the request of the abutter, the abutter to bear cne- 
half the expense of labor and material. 

Article 16. We recommend an appropriation of $500. for the use 
of the Public Safety Committee. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE REPORT. 



SUMMARY. 

The following summary includes all recommendations previously 
made in this report: — 

Selectmen, 

Auditing and Accounting, 

Treasurer and Collector, 

Assessors, 

Law, 

Town Clerk, 

Election and Registration, 

Town Hall, 

State Aid, 

Soldiers' Relief, 

Police, 

Fire. 

Forest Warden, 

Tree Warden, 

Parks, 

Sealer of Weights and Measures, 

Health Department, 

Highways and Snow, 

Cemeteries, 

Outside Poor, 

Town Farm, 

Note Payments, 

Interest, 

Department of Education, 

Electric Light Department, 

Unpaid Bills, 

Article 8 of Warrant, 

Article 12 of Warrant, 

Article 15 of Warrant, 

Article 16 of Warrant, 

Total, 



$ 2275 00 


1450 00 


3385 00 


860 00 


300 00 


560 00 


575 00 


2180 00 


2500 00 


1500 00 


4800 00 


6950 00 


100 00 


400 00 


350 00 


210 00 


3500 00 


19000 00 


1800 00 


8000 00 


3700 00 


11100 00 


8507 00 


46500 00 


2450 0G 


655 54 


250 00 


3000 00 


200 00 


500 00 


$137,557 54 



8 FINANCE COMMITTEE REPORT. 

We note with satisfaction that the unpaid bills have been reduced 
to $655 54 this year as against $5133 59 outstanding in 1^17. 

We call attention to the yearly increase in expenses and to the 
necessity of using extreme caution in voting appropriations if a low tax 
rate is desired this year. 

The Committee extends its thanks to the members of the various 
Boards, and to the Town Accountant, their assistance and informati on 
in regard to town business, from which we have prepared this report. 

CHARLES M. KELLYj Chairman, 
FREDERICK A. KIMBALL, 
THOMAS R. LORD, 
ALBERT JODREY, 
EBEN B. MOULTON, 
ROGER S. WARNER, 
CHARLES S. GARRETTE. 
JESSE HARRIS WADE, Secretary. 







Essex, ss. 

To Wesley B. Atkinson, Constable of the Town of Ipswich, in 
said County, Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you 

are directed to notify the inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, 

qualified to vote in town affairs, to meet at the Town Hall, in 

said Ipswich, on 



MONDAY, THE FIFTH DAY OF MARCH NEXT, 



at 7:30 o'clock in the evening, then and there to act upon the 
following articles, viz: 



Article 1 . To choose a Moderator to preside at said meet- 
ing. 

Article 2. To fix the compensation of Town Officers. 

Article 3. To choose the following officers, viz: One Se- 
lectman for three years; one Assessor of Taxes for three years; 
one Overseer of the Poor for three years; Town Clerk for three 
years; Treasurer and Collector of Taxes for one year; one Water 
and Electric Lighting Commissioner for three years; two mem- 
bers of the School Committee for three years; Constable for one 
year; one member of the Board of Health for three years; one 
Superintendent of Cemeteries for three years; one Park Com- 
missioner for three years; one Clam Commissioner for one 
year; one Clam Commissioner for two years; one Clam Commis- 
sioner for three years; also to vote Yes or No upon the follow- 
ing question: "Shall license be granted for the sale of intoxicating 
liquors in this town?" 

The above-named officers and question to be voted for upon 
one ballot on 

MONDAY, THE TWELFTH DAY OF MARCH, 1917. 

The polls will be opened at 6:15 o'clock A.M., and may be 
closed at 4:45 o'clock P.M. 

Article 4. To choose all other necessary Town Officers. 

Article 5. To hear and act upon the report of the Finance 
Committee, and raise and appropriate money for town charges 
for the ensuing year. 

Article 6. To see if the town will vote to authorize thee 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow moneji 
in anticipation of the revenue of the current financial year. 

Article 7. To see if the town will appoint the Collector or 
Taxes an agent of the town to collect all bills due the town. 



Article 8. To see it the town will appropriate the sum of 
$250.00 for the observance of Memorial Day. 

Article 9. To hear and act upon the reports of Trustees, 
Committees and Town Officers. 

Article 1 0. To see what action the town will take in re- 
gard to disposing of the Torrent Engine. 

Article 1 1 . To see if the town will appropriate a sum of 
money to defray the expenses of prosecuting the illegal liquor 
selling cases, not to exceed $300.00. 

Article 1 2. To see if the town will appropriate a sum of 
money to improve the Averoff wharf property, not to exceed 
$100.00, 

Article 1 3. To see if the town will make an additional ap- 
propriation of $1000.00 for Essex Road. 

Article 1 4. To see if the town will authorize the Water 
and Electric Lighting Commissioners to extend the water system 
to such parts of the town as may be desired, and provide for 
the payment thereof. 

Article 15. To see if the town will authorize the Water 
and Electric Lighting Commissioners to extend either the street 
or commercial lighting, and provide for the payment thereof. 

Article 1 6. To see if the town will vote to make an appro- 
priation towards the maintenance of the Cable Memorial Hos- 
pital. 

Article 1 7. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a 
sum of money not to exceed 5 per cent, of the tax levy of the 
year 1916, to be known as the Reserve Fund. 

Article 1 8. To see if the town will accept the provisions 
of Chapter 655, of the Acts and Resolves of the year 1913, and 
Acts in amendment thereof and in addition thereto, known as 
"An Act to Revise and Codify the Building Inspection Laws of 
the Commonwealth." 



Article 1 9. To see what action the town will take in re- 
gard to the town's interest in Jeffries Neck. 

Article 20. To see if the town will appropriate a sum of 
money not exceeding $250.00 for repairing the town clock. 

Article 2 1 . To see what action the town will take towards 
disposing of the town hearse and two barges. 

Article 22. To:ste if the town will appropriate the sum of 
$25.00 for maintaining the Playground for the ensuing year. 

Article 23. To see if the town will fix the date when taxes 
shall become due and payable. 

Article 24. To see what action the town will take in re- 
gard to disposing of the old gravel pit in the rear of the French 
Catholic Church off Washington Street. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting up 
attested copies thereof, one at the Town House, one at the Post 
Office, and one at each of the Public Meeting Houses in said 
town, seven days at least before the time of said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant, with 
your doings thereon, to the Town Clerk, at the time and place 
of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this twenty-first day of February, in 
the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and seventeen. 

FRANK W. KYES ") Selectmen 

JOHN A. BROWN [ of 

GEORGE E. HODGKINS ) Ipswich. 

A true copy. 

Attest: Constable. 

February 27, 1917. 



1G34 1Q18 

REPORT 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 

OF 

IPSWICH, M^SS., 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1917, 

AND THE 

Two Hundred and Eighty-fourth Year of the 
Town's Incorporation. 



IPSWICH. MASS.: 
GEO. A. SCHOFIELD & SON. PRINTERS. 

686 

L8 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



TOWN OFFICERS, 1917. 

SELECTMEN. 

Frank W. Kyes, Chairman. 

John A. Brown George E. Hodgkins 

ASSESSORS, 

John W. Nourse, Chairman, 

Richard R. Glasier William B. Richards 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Frank T. Goodhue, Chairman. 

Charles G. Hull, Agent John G. Sperling 

TOWN CLERK. 
Charles W. Bamford. 

TREASURER AND COLLECTOR. 
William J. Riley. John H. Cameron, Assistant 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Herbert W, Mason, Chairman. 

Howard N. Doughty, Secretary George E. MacArthur 

Joseph W. Ross William J. Riley Luther Wait 

REGISTRARS OF VOTERS, 

Charles H. Glasier, Chairman Charles W. Bamford. Clerk 

Lyman H. Daniels Frank H. Girard 

AUDITOR, 
Arthur H. Walton. 

ACCOUNTANT. 
Frederick S. Witham. 

CONSTABLE. 
Herbert 0. Whittier. 

MUNICIPAL WATER AND LIGHTING COMMISSION. 

George A.. Schofield, Chairman. 

George H. W, Hayes William H. Rand 

BOARD OF HEALTH. 

George E. MacArthur, Chairman Aaron Lord, Agent 

George W. Smith, Milk Inspector 

PARK COMMISSIONERS. 
Frank T. Goodhue, Chairman James A. Morey Charles H. Wells 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS. 
Philip E, Clarke, Chairman Howard Blake Edmund J. M. Scahill 



IPSWICH TOWN KEPORT. 



SUPT. MOTH SUPPRESSION DEPT. AND TREE WARDEN. 

James A. Morey. 

POUND KEEPER AND FIELD DRIVER. 
D. Sidney Perley 

FENCE VIE ERS. 
Warren Boynton Aaron Lord George H. Green 

SURVEYORS OF LUMBER AND MEASURERS OF WOOD, 
Joseph F. Austin William J, Norwood 

BURIAL AGENT. 
Philip E. Clarke. 

JANITOR OF TOWN HALL AND KEEPER OF LOCKUP. 

Alonzo L. Brown. 

CHIEF OF POLICE. 
John F. Dupray, 

TOWN COUNSEL. 
Albert F. Welsh, 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 
Joseph A, Huckins. 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 
William A. Stone. 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS. 
E. Newton Brown. 

ENGINEERS FIRE DEPARTMENT. 
Arthur H. Walton, Chief, Walter G. Brown, Clerk, Edwin M. Poole 

FOREST WARDEN. 
Arthur H. Walton. 

PUBLIC WEIGHER, 
Alonzo L. Brown. 

FINANCE COMMITTE. 
Charles M. Kelly, Chairman, Jesse H. Wade, Secretary, Thomas R. 
Lord, Albert Jodrey, Eben Moulton, Fred A. Kimball, 
Charles S. Garrette. 

MODERATOR, 
Charles E. Goodhue. 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



DEPARTMENTAL. 

SELECTMEN. 

SALARIES 

Frank W Kyes, $200 00 

John A Brown, 125 00 

George E Hodgkins, 125 00 



OTHER EXPENSES. 

Charles E Goodhue, moderator $ 20 00 

J H Lakeman. PM.. postage 24 82 

Hobbs & Warren, blanks 5 11 

Ipswich Chronicle, printing and advertising 334 98 

Charles G. Hull, printing 44 00 

Essex Book Bindery, binding reports 59 00 

C C Caldwell's Garage, auto hire 6 00 

Samual D Dodge, auto hire 2 00 

New England T & T Co., telephone ,283 10 

City of Beverly, wire inspection 104 00 

A Stanley Wonson, wire inspection 180 00 

Albert F Welsh, legal services and expenses 148 39 

John E Dodge, ringing bell 58 32 

Wesley B Atkinson, constable fee 5 00 

Herbert O Whittier, constable fee 42 00 



$450 00 



6 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Edward M artel, distributing reports 

Charles E Poor. 

Harold C Poor, 

Henry A Churchill, 

James H Hull, Jr., 

Horace Ellsworth, 

William Burnham, 

Albert E Ellwell, 

Wm R Burns, trucking 

G A Barker, liability insurance 

John F Wippich, care of town clock, two years 

John W Goodhue, baling press and supplies 

Jesse H Wade, secretary Finance Committee 

Joseph I Horton, cash paid out 

American Express Co., express 

Harding Uniform & Regalia Co., flag 

Canney Lumber Co., lumber 

Matthew Bender Co., law book 

Elbe File & Binder Co., binder 

Rees Jenkins, teaming 

James H Hull, painting 

Wm H Jewett, killing dog 

Edward Leavitt, killing dogs 

John F Dupray, killing dog 

John F Dupray, serving dog warrant 

Ipswich News Co., supplies 

Measures Co.. 

H B McArdle, 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, fee 

Frederick S Witham, cash paid out 

A J Barton, auctioneer 

Walter F Gould, auctioneer 



$ 2 00 


2 00 


2 00 


2 00 


2 00 


2 00 


4 00 


2 9U 


4 30 


166 88 


50 00 


33 63 


50 00 


2 56 


55 


34 25 


4 06 


10 50 


4 10 


11 55 


3 00 


1 00 


8 00 


1 00 


10 00 


3 50 


7 50 


1 20 


5 00 


4 00 


5 00 


5 00 



- $1762 20 



Total expenditures, 
Unexpended balance. 



$2212 20 
21 76 



$2233 96 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Appropriation, 

Appropriation unpaid 1916 bills, 

Transfer from Reserve Fund, 



$1950 00 
183 96 
100 00 



$2233 96 



AUDITING AND ACCOUNTING. 

SALARIES. 

Arthur H Walton, auditor 
Frederick S Witham, accountant 

OTHER EXPENSES. 
Chas G Hull, printing 
Chas Palmer Potter, printing 
H B McArdle, supplies 
Boston Index Card Co., supplies 
Dalton Adding Machine Co., repairs 
Philip B Smith, supplies 
John W Goodhue, supplies 
C F Chapman & Son, supplies 
A H Walton, cash paid out 
F S Witham, cash paid out 
American Express Co., express 



Total expenditures, 
Unexpended balance, 



$ 150 00 


1200 00 


$11 00 


44 24 


9 83 


14 60 


4 05 


3 00 


1 25 


1 20 


3 00 


3 45 


2 33 



$1350 00 



$97 95 



$1447 95 
2 05 



Appropriation, 

TREASURER AND COLLECT 

SALARIES AND WAGES. 

Wm J Riley, Treasurer and Collector, 
Wm J Riley, balance 1916 salary, 
John H Cameron, Assistant, 
James Damon, " 





$1450 00 


)R. 


$1450 00 


$1500 00 




23 33 




788 43 




148 66 





IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Grace G Bamford, Clerk, 


$162 23 




Frederick S Witham, Clerical work, 


25 00 


$2647 65 






OTHER EXPENSES. 






J H Lakeman, P M,, postage, 


$142 63 




Chas Palmer Potter, printing, 


21 56 




First National Bank, checks, 


7 75 




Ipswich Chronicle, printing and advertising, 


63 95 




Wm J Riley, cash paid out, 


7 75 




H B McArdle, supplies, 


9 82 


, 


Dalton Adding Machine Co., repairs, 


7 70 




H M Meserve & Co., stamp, 


3 85 




Measures Co., supplies, 


1 35 




Bureau of Statistics, certification of notes, 


12 00 




G A Barker, bond, 


325 00 




American Express Co., express, 


2 11 




Arthur Bishop sheriff fees, 


15 78 




Albert F Welsh, collection fees, 


178 23 




Banker & Tradesman, subscription. 


5 00 








$ 804 48 


Total expenditures, 


$3452 13 


Unexpended balance, 




1 20 




$3453 33 


Appropriation, 


$3130 00 




Appropriation unpaid 1916 bills. 


23 33 




Transfer from Reserve Fund, 


300 00 


$3453 33 






ASSESSORS. 






SALARIES, 






John W Nourse, 


$400 00 




Richard R Glasier, 


150 00 




Wm B Richards, 


150 00 


$700 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



OTHER EXPENSES. 
Hobbs & Warren, blanks, 
J H Lakeman, P M., stamps, 
Wakefield Daily Item, blanks, 
Ipswich Chronicle, printing, 
Wm B Richards, use of team, 
C F Chapman & Son, ticket, 
Wm Jones, tax information, 
Lilla D Stott, abstracts of deeds, 
John W Nourse, cash paid out. 



$ 7 70 


1 00 


8 25 


50 10 


25 30 


1 30 


1 CO 


43 60 


2 00 



$140 25 



Total expenditures, $840 25 

Unexpended balance, 19 75 



$860 00 
Appropriation, $860 00 

LAW DEPARTMENT. 

SALARIES. 

Albert F Welsh, Town Counsel, 
Albert F Welsh, balance 1916 salary, 

OTHER EXPENSES. 
Horace I Bartlett, unpaid bill— services 

Clarke case, 
Geo H W Hayes, unpaid bill— services 

Clarke case, 
Hayes & Schofield, unpaid bill — services 

Clarke case, 
Albert F Welsh, legal services 



Total expenditures, 
Unexpended balance, 



$100 00 
16 67 


$116 67 




$2265 63 




516 30 




568 00 
345 00 


$3694 93 




3811 60 
65 00 



$3876 60 



10 irSWICH TOWN EEPORT. 

Appropriation, $ 500 00 

Appropriation unpaid 1916 bills,, 3376 60 



$3876 60 



TOWN CLERK. 

SALARIES 

Charles W Bamf ord, Town Clerk, $350 00 



OTHER EXPENSES, 

Ipswich Chronicle, printing, $ 6 00 

Carter's Ink Co.. ink, 2 20 

Library Bureau, supplies, 1 00 

•lohn W Goodhue, " 05 
Chas W Bamford, recording: and indexing 

births, etc., 128 10 

Chas W Bamford; cash paid cut, 10 48 

American Express Co., express. 34 

T H Woodworth, repairs, 2 75 

E J M Scahill, death returns, 31 00 

M C McGinley, M D., birth returns, 4 75 

Geo G Bailey, M D., birth returns, 22 25 

Catinga Georgepulos, " " 3 00 

B J Conley, supplies, 1 25 



Appropropriation, 
Appropriation unpaid 1916 bills, 



ELECTION AND REGISTRATION. 

SALARIES. 

Chas H Glasier, Registrar, $50 00 



$350 00 



$213 17 

Total expenditures, $563 17 

Unexpended balance, 08 





$563 25 


$560 00 




3 25 






$563 25 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



11 



Chas W Bamford, Registrar, $50 00 

Frank H Girard, " 50 00 

Lyman H Daniels, * 4 50 00 



ELECTION OFFICERS, 
Stephen R Harris, $18 50 

Geo A Schofield, Jr., 15 50 

James S Cassidy, 5 00 

Frank E Howe, 5 00 

Frank H Girard, 7 25 

Jonn H Peatfield, 16 25 

Henry Brown, 
Chas S Grant, 
Andrew McGinley, 
Carleton Crafts, 
J Frank Austin, 
O F Thompson, 
D J Marlin, 
Jesse J Jedrey, 
John R Morris. 
E Carl Copp, 
Edward Haskell, 
Daniel VIcKinnon, 
Geo A Schofield , 
Geo H Demore, 
Frank W Kyes, 
John A Brown, 
Geo E Hodgkins, 
Geo W Smith. 
Arthur H Tozer, 
Willis L Augur, 4 00 

W Malcolm Atkinson, 2 00 

Joseph W Ross, 4 00 

David Claxton, 3 00 

Walter F Gould, 2 00 

V E Rust, 5 00 



50 

50 

50 

50 

50 

11 25 

3 50 

9 00 

3 50 

3 50 

3 50 

7 50 

3 50 

3 50 

13 50 

13 50 

13 50 

13 50 

5 75 



$200 00 



12 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Michael J Lucey, 




3 00 




Arthur H Walton, 




3 00 




Michael ( allahan, 




2 00 




Wm C Wallace, 




2 00 




Ovila Rathe, 




2 00 


$229 50 








OTHER EXPENSES. 






Ipswich Chronicle, 


printing, 


$44 60 




Fred R Hull, 




6 00 




H A Russell, meals 


, 


39 45 











$90 05 



Appropriation, $650 00 

Appropriation unpaid 1916 bills, 9 35 



TOWN HALL. 

SALARIES. 

Alonzo L Brown, janitor, $725 00 



FUEL AND LIGHT. 



Lathrop Brothers, 
A H Peatfield, 
Chas L Lovell, 
George Fall, 
John A Brown, 
Electric Light Dept., 



REPAIRS. 



J J Merrill, labor, 
Albert S Garland, labor, 
Manzer & Damon, carpentry, 



$147 75 


112 29 


138 11 


155 59 


16 00 


497 01 


$24 18 


1 70 


5 84 



Total expenditures, $519 55 

Unexpended balance, 139 80 



$659 35 
$659 35 



$725 00 



$1066 75 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 13 



$ 1 21 


6 59 


12 49 


5 25 


22 05 


6 91 


41 32 


4 85 



Canney Lumber Co., lumber. 
E M Poole, carpentry, 
Austin L Lord, masonry, 
James S Rogers, plumbing, 
George Hayes, plumbing, 
Arthur H Walton, painting, 
John W Goodhue, hardware, 
A I Savory, hardware, 



OTHER EXPENSES. 

Electric Light Department, fixtures, $22 50 

Dustbane Mfg Co., dustbane, 

N J Bolles, supplies, 

W N Prescott, supplies, 

B J Conley, supplies, 

Middlesex County H of C, supplies, 

C S Tyler, supplies, 

A C Damon, supplies, 

Geo B Robbins Co., supplies, 

C F Chapman & Son, supplies. 

John F Wippich, clock repairs, 

Alonzo L Brown, cash paid out for laundrv 

Henry Bushek, inspection, 

Water Department, water, 

New England T & T Co.. telephone, 

Damon & Damon, insurance, 

T H Perkins, trucking. 

Peoples Express Co., express, 

J LHammect Co., supplies, 

American Express Co., express, 

F E Wood, trucking. 

Estate J A Blake, supplies, 

Elmer C Smith, labor, 

Geo Brockelbank, labor, 



14 00 


4 45 


2 68 


2 50 


5 45 


3 69 


6 82 


25 00 


2 25 


75 


8 97 


4 00 


17 33 


58 11 


15 90 


2 25 


35 


8 00 


52 


50 


1 00 


75 


1 00 



$132 39 



$208 77 



U IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

Total expenditures, $2132 91 

Unexpended balance, 12 58 



$2145 49 

Appropriation, $2060 00 

appropriation unpaid 1916 bills, 85 49 

$2145 49 



Protection of Persons and Property. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT, 

SALARIES AND WAGES. 



John F Dupray, Chief, 




$1092 00 


Valorous H Grant, Patrolman, 


1169 67 


Clifford C Boylan, 


<< 


1142 49 


Edward Leavitt, 


<< 


942 77 


Wm H Jewett, 


Special, 


276 60 


Herbert Whittier, 


< i 


278 08 


Lawrence W Littlefield, 


1 1 


69 76 


Jesse J Jedrey, 


* < 


51 52 


Elmer C Smith, 


1 1 


34 85 


John E Greene, 


i i 


24 96 


George Brockelbank, 


t< 


22 08 


Albert S Garland. 


€4 


1 75 



$5106 53 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 15 

OTHER EXPENSES. 

Alonzo L Brown, keeper of lock-up, $ 56 00 

Wm H Jewett, 4 * " " 37 00 

Geo Brockelbank, " " - 151 50 

Mrs. A L Brown, matron, 1 25 

A B Boynton, auto hire, 1 50 

Caldwell's Garage, auto hire, 37 75 

S D Dodge, auto hire, 6 50 

R W Davis, auto hire, 1 00 

Davis & Dodge, auto hire. 5 00 

C F Chapman & Son, supplies, 6 25 

R W Davis, supplies, 4 20 

Ipswich Chronicle, printing, 7 50 

New England T & T Co., telephone, 41 83 

Edward Leavitt, car fare, 2 20 

Geo H Demore, meals, 8 80 

H A Russell, meals, t55 26 

Annie Brockelbank, meals, 33 35 

Geo G Dexter, photographs, 5 00 

Ernest E Currier, storage, 2 00 

John W Goodhue, supplies, 7 50 

M C McGinley, M D., medical attendance, 10 00 

W E Tucker, MD, " " 2 00 

Geo E Mac Arthur, MD,," " 15 50 

Harry W Goodale, M D., examination, 5 00 

J H Lakeman, P M., stamps, 4 00 

B J Conley, supplies, 1 25 

$569 14 



Total expenditures, $5675 67 

Unexpended balance, 57 18 



$5732 85 



Appropriation, $4500 00 

Appropriation unpaid 1916 bills, 32 85 



W 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Transfer from Reserve Fund r 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



SALARIES AND WAGES, 



1200 00 



$5732 85 



Engineers 








% 320 00 


Hose Co. No. 1 and H & LCc 


) r 


1162 14 


Hose Co. No, 2, 








• 353 34 


Edward H Smith, 


, driver r 




966 00 


A F Burnham, 


<<- 






197 50 


John R Morris, janitor, 






310 00 


Frank Seahill, 


« < 






12 50 


Wm B Riehards, 


labor, 






1 5a 


J H Hardy, labor still alarms, 




25 


Geo Hills 


< » 


« ( 




75 


Fred Maekinney, 


labor 


still a 


larms 


50 


A H Walton, 


< i 


»< 


t . 


2 50 


A F Burnham, 


tt 


<•* 


t* 


3 50 


Charles Gwinn, 


ii 


« »■ 


> • 


50 


E H Smith, 


«# 


• < 


t * 


3 00 


Charles Dort, 


M 


M 


« * 


2 50 


Frank Mallard, 


< « 


< < 


* 


4 25 


Chester Patch, 


tt 


« ( 


< * 


1 50 


Thos Gauld, 


< t 


«i 


1 1 


1 75 


C J Dupray, 


ft 


o 


< i 


1 75 


Wm H Goditt, 


tt 


*t 


• 


3 75 


Edw H Smith, Jr 


< * 


r< 


< *■ 


25 


E A Smith, 


< • 


• 


i » 


50 


J A Huckins, 


< • 


♦ < 


1 1 


1 25 


E M Poole, 


t # 


(1 


i t 


1 00 


Ernest Jewett, 


4 i 


< * 


i * 


. 1 25 


Benj Spencer, 


fl 


< « 


< < 


1 00 


Wm Stone, 


( • 


« 4 


< t 


1 00 


Raymond Dodge, 


tt 


( < 


4 < 


1 75 


Ralph Gilmore, 


1 4 


< < 


4 4 


50 


James Dolan, 


4 « 


4 i 


I i 


50 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 17 

Edw F Smith, labor still alarms $2 75 

J .R Richards, '" " 25 

A Richards, M " 

James Sirtle, - " *' 

A M Sheppard, " " " 

Omer Marcorell, ** 

NL Harris, *' " 

Harry Sheppard, 4< " 

WmB Richards, '* •* 

Ernest Carter, '* " 

Jesse Jedrey, 

J SV Russell, 



HORSES, 



Highway Department, 
F L Burke & Son 



EQUIPMENT AND REPAIRS. 

•Cornelius Callahan Co., hose 
Gamewell Fire Alarm Tel Co., supplies 
Electric Light Department, services 
J J Merrill, services and supplies 
C F Chapman & Son, supplies 
Mayer & Porter, repairs and supplies 
Canney Lumber Co., lumber 
American Express, express 
Peter Robertson, supplies 
Chester Patch, labor 
Hiller & Co., supplies 
Marcorelle Brothers, supplies 
Combination Ladder Co,, supplies 
E E Currier, supplies 
Chas L Lovell, supplies 
A I Savory, supplies 
Peoples Express Co., express 
joseph A King, repairs 



75 


25 


25 


25 


25 


25 


25 


25 


1 50 


25 


'fi 00 ^ 7*} 


tpoo' »0 io 


$200 00 


50 00 

<£OE:fl Aft 


rp_ D\) V 1 ' 
-i 


$300 00 


2 04 


25 80 


216 09 


21 78 


122 31 


17 31 


2 19 


29 78 


3 50 


1 54 


3 40 


41 83 


147 60 


75 


8 51 


45 


2 52 



1 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

Est J A Blake, supplies 

Fiske & Harris, supplies 

Badger Fire Extinguisher Co., supplies 

F E v< ood. trucking 

Western Union Tel Co., service 

John W Goodhue, supplies 

C S Tyler, supplies 

Henry Busek, inspection 

N J Bolles, supplies 



HYDYANT SERVICE. 
Water Department $300 00 



FUEL AND LIGHT. 
A H Peatfield 
Chas L Lovell 
George Fall 
Lathrop Brother? 
Electric Light Department 



2 45 


26 U 


3 7 


9 10 


16 25 


34 44 


12 41 


9 00 


3 05 



$237 15 


208 56 


143 92 


149 71 


140 11 



$1063 97 



$300 00 



$879 45 



MAINTENANCE OF BUILDING AND GROUNDS. 

George Hayes, plumbing $ 4 08 

Arthur H Walton, painting 174 05 

J H Hardy, carpentry 12 25 

R L Purinton, plumbing 27 SI 

H W Phillips, supplies 12 50 

A C Damon, supplies 5 65 

Water Department, water 4 00 

C H Brooks, plumbing 2 50 

Chas L Lovell, supplies 7 18 

Dustbane Mfg Co., dustbane 9 OP 

Canney Lumber Co., lumber 12 89 

E M Poole, carpentry 12 00 

A W Gould, carpentry 3 95 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 19 



Electric Light Department, supplies $ 75 

Gustavus Kinsman, rent of land 40 00 



OTHER EXPENSFS, 
Ipswich Chronicle, printing 
New England T & T Co., telephone 
Hiller & Co., supplies 
C S Tyler, supplies 
Water Department, water 
G A Gauld, supplies 
Walter G Brown, labor 
E C Brooks, agent, insurance 
Geo A Schofleld, insurance 
E Newton Brown, rent of land 
Somerville Brush Co., supplies 
T P Thomas, repairs 
Marcorelle Brothers, supplies 
Arthur H Walton, cash paid out 
American Express Co., express 



PENSION, 
Agnes K Gilmore, $300 00 



$ 40 


102 29 


2 70 


5 60 


4 00 


75 


2 00 


25 20 


6 00 


140 00 


6 27 


5 33 


6 12 


4 00 


37 



$328 61 



$300 00 



$311 03 



Total expenditures, $6798 79 

Unexpended balance 191 61 



Appropriation, $6800 00 

Appropriation unpaid 1916 bills, 190 40 



$6990 40 



$6990 40 



w 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



FOREST WARDEN DEPARTMENT, 

FIGHTING FIRES. 



Sundry Persons, labor 

OTHER EXPENSES. 
N L Harris,, use of auto 
Walter G Brown, labor 
American LaFrance Engine Co.. supplies- 
Fiske & Harris, supplies 



Total expenditures, 
Unexpended balance 



4>ol '£& 



$5 00' 

3 00 
7 84 

4 37 



Appropriation, 






$100 00 


Transfer from Reserve Fund 




15 00 




MOTH DEPARTMENT. 






SALARIES AND 


WAGES, 




James A Morey, Superintendent 




$828 00 


John Floyd, 


labor 




576 76 


Augustus McGinnis, " 




578 25 


Ernest Lord, 


it 




179 96 


Frank McGinnis, 


It 




69 44 


Wm A Lord, 


( t 




89 36 


Joseph Chase, 


t* 




13 41 


Alvery Marriott, 


It 




395 16 


Albert Chapman, 


te 




399 88 


Silas Stone, 


i* 




53 43 


J Frank Goodhue, 


<• 




106 23 


Frank T Goodhue, 


clerical work 




30 00 



$81 23 



$20 21 



$101 44 
13 56 

$115 00 



$115 00 



$3319 88 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 21 



OTHER EXPENSES, 

James A Morey, use of truck 

D A Grady, use of team 

Libie J Wood, use of team 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, tools 

A I Savory, supplies 

Minnie Dort, rent 

E E Currier, supplies 

Mayer & Porter, supplies 

Chas W Bamford, administering oaths 

A D Mallard, trucking 

F E Wood, trucking 

American Express Co., express 



Total expenditures. 
Balance 1916 appropriation 
Appropriation, December, 1917 
Moth Tax — Private work 



WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

SALARIES, 

Wm A Stone, Sealer $150 00 



OTHER EXPENSES, 
Hobbs & Warren, record book 
Ipswich Chronicle, advertising 
T H Perkins, use of team 
D A Grady, use of team 
W & L E Gurley, supplies 
James Graffm, supplies 
A C Damon, supplies 
Jnhn W Goodhue, supplies 



$872 50 




114 00 




150 00 




67 02 




2 50 




72 00 




37 65 




6 50 




2.1 00 




1 60 




8 78 




1 28 






$854 83 






$4174 71 


12116 26 




578 85 




1479 60 




« — 


$4174 71 



$2 91 


2 50 


2 85 


24 50 


9 62 


2 90 


3 50 


2 90 



$150 00 



-$51 68 



22 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Total expenditures 




$201 68 


Unexpended blance 




23 32 

$225 00 


Appropriation 




$225 00 


TREE WARDEN. 






SALARIES AND WAGES, 






James A Morey, labor 


$72 00 




John Floyd, labor 


40 93 




Albert Chapman, labor 


60 00 




J Frank Goodhue, labor 


31 86 




Augustus McGinnis. labor 


15 00 




Alvary Marriott, labor 


15 00 




Joseph Robichau, labor 


1 38 





OTHER EXPENSES, 

A I Savory, supplies $ 5 35 

Canney Lumber Co,, lumber 12 94 

C F Chapman & Son, supplies 2 45 

DA Grady, use of team 15 50 

James A Morey, use of truck, 45 00 

John W Goodhue, supplies 23 93 



Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



$236 IT 



Appropriation 



$105 17 

$341 34 
58 66 

$400 00 
$400 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 23 



HEALTH AND SANITATION. 

GENERA], ADMINISTRATION. 

SALARIES, 

George E MacArthur, M D $100 00 

George W Smith 75 00 

Aaron Lord 75 00 



OTHER EXPENSES, 
J H Lakeman, PM.. postage 
Hobbs & Warren, blanks 
Ipswich Chronicle, printing 
New England T & T Co., telephone 
Chas GDa\, garbage collection 
Joseph Martei, *■' " 

George E MacArthur, M D>, services 
D A Grady, team 
Rees Jenkins, team 
American Express Co., express 
Amelia Clarke, typewriting 
Albert F Welsh, legal services 
W N Prescott, supplies 



$ 11 8? 


1 40 


26 75 


30 51 


297 86 


29 16 


18 38 


1 00 


11 55 


5 09 


1 00 


40 00 


42 31 



- $250 00 



$516 88 



24 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 

QUARANTINE AND CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

George E MacArthur, M D., services $ 94 50 

George G Bailey, M D., services 28 75 

Edna Macafee, services 18 00 

Marion P Manague, services 75 46 

Jesse J Jedrey, patrol duty 3 84 

Wm H Jewett, " 5 12 

Salem Contagious Hospital, board and care 155 14 

E J M Scahill, fumigation and transportation 110 90 

George Haskell, fumigation 8 00 

C C Caldwell Garage, use of auto 6 00 



TUBERCULOSIS. 

North Reading Sanatorium, board and care 

Lynn Tuberculosis Hospital, 

Town Farm, ' " " 

George E MacArthur, M D., services 

George G Bailey, M D., services 

M C McGinley, M D., services 

John W Goodhue, supplies 

First Department Store Co., supplies 

W N Prescott, supplies 

Tougas & Tougas, groceries 

H H Roper, milk 

John F Dupray, milk 

G A Gauld, groceries 

Lathrop Brothers, moving building 

INSPECTION. 

E Newton Brown, Inspector of Animals 
E Newton Brown, ' Slaughtering 

George W Smith, " " Milk 

Aaron Lord, Sanitary Agent 
C C Caldwell, use of auto 



$ 58 29 


89 14 


49 00 


285 75 


46 50 


3 00 


75 


7 10 


57 05 


79 50 


24 40 


36 10 


75 


10 00 


* 


$175 00 


161 00 


225 00 


525 00 


10 00 



$505 71 



747 33 



$1096 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 25 

CHILD WELFARE DEPARTMENT. 

George E MacArthur, Director $100 00 

Coburn Charitable Association, services of 

welfare nurse 
Myrtle Goditt, clerk 
Hobbs & Warren, blanks 
Jordan Marsh Co,, supplies 
Geo H Dean, printing 
F H Thomas Co., scales 
Margaret Leno, labor 
A C Damon, furnishings 
Sarah E Fewkes, labor 
John W Goodhue, supplies 

$398 2S 

Total expenditures $3514 21 

Unexpended balance 69 35 



218 


70 


12 


00 


4 48 


2 


01 


15 


50 


10 


50 


4 


00 


23 40 


6 


30 


1 


40 



$3583 56 



Appropriation $3450 00 

Appropriation unpaid 1916 bills 133 56 



13583 56 



26 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Highway Department 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATION. 



Joseph A Huckins, Superintendent 


$1299 98 


Amelia M Clarke, typewriting 


1 00 


American Express Co. 


, express 


4 16 


Peoples Express Co., 


express 


1 40 


Measures Co.. supplies 


j 


8 75 


Mass. Highway Comn 


lission, fee 
STREET REPAIRS. 


5 00 








LABOR AND TEAMS. 




James W Appleton 




$ 26 88 


Nicholas Averoff 




94 


Wm Arsenault 




28 49 


Chas G Brown 




12 00 


Ralph Brockelbank 




416 65 


James W Burns 




15 52 


A Story Brown 




201 11 


Edward Bodwell 




124 48 


E Newton Brown 




8 25 


Allan W Brown 




10 63 



$1320 29 






IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 27 

John A Brown $75 75 

Howard Blake 2 50 

Ernest Carter 605 24 

Thos Cummings 6 55 

Wm O Conant . 663 97 

W K Chapman 5 25 

Carl A Caverly 69 92 

Eugene Chapman 7 58 

Patrick Donlon 11 18 

Walter Ellsworth 10 62 

Elwyn Fessenden 291 00 

Wm H Fessenden 87 38 

Walter F Gould 10 68 

Samuel Gordon 16 88 

Albert Grenier 119 98 

Philip Gallant 105 60 

Stephen George 112 32 

David Gannon 2 81 

Lawrence Gwinn 9 36 

Frank E Howe 9 78 

Rees Jenkins 30 09 

Chas Jewett 3 00 

Jesse J Jedrey :388 46 

Daniel Kelley 403 74 

Lathrop Brothers 63 67 

Thos R Lord 25 77 

A G Lauer 147 29 

G H Lauer , 2 50 

Edward Martel 10 65 

John R Morris 1 98 

Louis Martel 46 02 

Chas Mallard 14 37 

Franklin B Mitchell 5 00 

Irving Manzer $7 47 

John McCarthy 143 72 

H W Norris 58 92 

Joseph Phaneuf 3 00 



28 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Lyman Perley 


$ 37 50 




D S Perley 


133 84 




Frank Perkins 


404 11 




Nicholas Pappayanopouios 


18 18 




W L Phillips 


88 66 




Edwin M Poole 


5 36 




Chester Patch 


658 02 




Arthur Quill 


5 00 




Thos R Roberts 


288 00 




Jonn J Riley 


175 14 




Frank Scahill 


129 59 




Chester Scahill 


2 50 




Albert Sheppard 


759 00 




Edward Spiller 


6 59 




Newman Saunders 


10 00 




James Sheppard 


305 62 




Joseph Stinson 


27 50 




Chas Saunders 


58 43 




Lillian G Stanford 


78 00 




Geo Tibbetts 


84 




Turner Hill Farm 


488 47 




Peter Tas 


2 50 




Edmund Wile 


66 95 




Wilfred Wile 


9 00 




Warren Warner 


5 00 




Harry Wilkinsora 


321 93 




Lester Wood 


324 00 




A N Wells 


5 00 




C F Welsh 


22 00 




Libie J Wood 


21 37 




Collins York 


76 29 




Wm F Rutherford 


4 00 









$9049 14 


SAND, GRAVEL, OIL, 


ETC. 




Anffie P Brown 


$568 75 




Herbert Illsley 


2 00 





IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 29 

John A Brown $14 00 

Est Geo Harris 6 45 

Michael Ryan 37 80 

E Newton Brown . 2 45 

Justin E Hull 2 00 

Viola F Lef avour 4 20 

James Frazier 5 00 

Est Eugene Sullivan 12 95 

Lillian G Stanford 38 00 

Nicholas Pappayanopoulos 6 75 

Bradley Palmer 26 00 

Mrs A B Fellows 22 75 

Turner Hill Farm 56 50 

Tilton Brothers 17 50 

Jerry Dailey 6 00 

Independent Goal Tar Co. 20 5,6 

Canney Lumber Co. 57 12 

Standard Oil Co. 862 25 

Chas L Lovell 39 86 

The Barrett Co, 228 00 

$2036 89 



EQIPMENT AND REPAIRS. 
Joseph A King, repairs 
John W Goodhue, supplies 
Mayer & Porter, repairs and supplies 
Ernest E Currier, " 
Canney Lumber Co., lumber 
J W A Hayes, supplies 
New England Road Machinery Co., supplies 
James Graffum, repairs 
Chester Patch, supplies 
Manzer & Damon, carpentry 
J J Merrill, supplies 
Arthur H Walton, painting 
Chas G Hull, painting 



$ 89 35 


204 64 


145 82 


93 29 


80 71 


6 50 


41 68 


1 00 


7 75 


10 44 


2 38 


3 50 


2 00 



30 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

Arthur G Osborne, supplies 

Traffic Sign & Signal Co., signs 

Good Roads Machinery Co., supplies 

Geo E Daniels, repairs 

Clinton Wire Cloth Co,, supplies 

Geo E Hodgkins, insurance 

L E Willcomb, supplies 

Richard W Davis, supplies 

Peerless Rubber Mfg Co., supplies 

Wm P Reilly, supplies 

Austin L Lord, masonry 

John E Greene, carpentry 

Harold L Bond Co., supplies 

Henry Bushek, inspeccion 

A C Damon, supplies 

Wm A Spiller, repairs 

John EL*enmann & Co., supplies 

F L Burke & Son. fuel . 

W Castella Henderson, repairs 

Turner Hill Farm, bridge repairs 

John Lucas & Co., paint 

Reuben Andrews, painting 

A J Barton & Son. labor 

E M Poole, carpentry 

C F Chapman & Son, supplies 

A I Savory, supplies 

Hammatt Street Garage, supplies 

C C Caldwell Garage, supplies 



SIDEWALKS. 

A J Barton & Son, edgestones $422 11 



$ 9 75 


33 60 


22 80 


25 50 


10 90 


76 75 


55 


14 00 


16 50 


95 


107 50 


34 10 


38 50 


5 00 


1 85 


32 00 


12 00 


12 25 


2 F0 


91 29 


2 00 


93 49 


1 05 


1 41 


1 55 


8 85 


4 90 


9 97 



$1360 5' 



$422 11 



BUOfS. 

George Brockelbank, care of buoys $278 00 

A I Savory, supplies 91 02 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



31 



John W Goodhue, supplies 


$ 4 00 


Canney Lumber Co., lumber 


37 42 


C S Tyler, supplies 


16 80 


James Averoff, supplies 


11 02 




yid'ZR °fi 


*■ 


ifrlOO LAJ 


FLOATS, 




Justin E Hull, labor 


% 8 00 


Canney Lumber Co., lumber 


24 14 


George Brockelbank, labor 


21 50 


C A Ring, labor 


12 60 




tpClO Ztt. 


SNOW AND ICE, 




James W Appleton 


$15 27 


Wilfred Atherley 


1 12 


Henry H Brown 


32 78 


George H Brockelbank 


H 74 


Francis N Bourque 


1 40 


Wm F Burns 


9 42 


Wm Burnham 


4 49 


Irving Brown 


5 33 


Dennis Bryant 


6 82 


Wm H Burnham 


11 10 


Chas G Brown 


6 50 


Geo Brockelbank 


2 25 


Robt Bruce 


4 50 


John H Brown 


7 03 


Jesse Brown 


14 78 


Ralph Brockelbank 


10 35 


James W Burns 


3 08 


A Story Brown w 


28 31 


Geo Burbidge 


5 76 


Edward Bodwell 


9 62 


E Newton Brown 


4 78 


Allan W Brown 


4 47 


Chester Brockelbank 


3 09 



32 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

Ernest Carter 
Henry Churchill 
Thos dimming s 
Wm Conant 
Fred G Cross 
Eugene Chouinard 
J F Claxton, Jr 
Carl A Caverly 
Wm Cameron 
Castle Hill Farm 
Patrick Donlon 
John Douglas 
Chas Dolan 
Chas Dort 
Raymond Dodge 
L R Davison 
Walter Dodge 
Walter Ellsworth 
Albert Elwell 
Elwyn Fe«senden 
Albert Grenier 
Philip Gallant 
Edward G Hull 
Jas H Hull, Jr 
George Hills 
Orrie M Hills 
Stanley Hills 
Frank E Howe 
Chas Henley 
Geo A Hodgdon 
Rees Jenkins 
Ernest Jewett 

4 

Chas Jewett 
Leander Jewett 
Jesse Jedrey 
W Quincy Kinsman 
Dalbert Kent 



$137 31 


9 98 


3 64 


6 26 


12 09 


2 67 


2 25 


5 90 


2 81 


77 56 


21 61 


2 25 


4 21 


10 11 


6 60 


2 39 


2 23 


8 99 


4 78 


63 00 


7 31 


6 29 


84 


8 99 


84 


1 12 


1 96 


1 68 


2 11 


3 00 


44 98 


5 42 


55 56 


10 40 


5 31 


6 18 


1 96 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 33 



Edward Kent 

Daniel Kelley 

Lathrop Brothers 

Thos R Lord 

Everett Lang 

A G Lauer 

John Lind 

Wm Lord 

G H Lauer 

Edward Martel 

Joseph Martel 

John R Morris 

Raymond Manthorn 

Winfield Martel 

Chas Martel 

Frank Mallard 

Fred McGilvary 

John McCarthy 

H W Norris 

Joseph Phaneuf 

Lyman Perley 

D S Perley 

Frank Perkins 

Nicholas Pappayanopoulos 

W L Phillips 

Star Princewood 

Walter Prentiss 

Chas E Poor 

Harold C Poor 

Chester Patch 

Arthur Quill 

Thos R Roberts 

Walter Ross 
Howard Roper 
Daniel Ready 
Wm F Rutherford 



$ 1 70 


5 62 


102 68 


56 00 


2 25 


24 00 


1 12 


3 93 


5 00 


5 90 


5 00 


9 87 


3 09 


84 


84 


2 75 


6 12 


1 63 


8 64 


18 00 


8 64 


27 28 


32 14 


4 01 


13 82 


10 50 


4 50 


9 84 


9 84 


35 00 


4 49 


207 00 


2 25 


7 02 


5 90 


4 50 



34 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

V E Rust, Jr 

John J Riley 

Arnold Richards 

Frank Scahill 

Albert Sheppard 

Isaac Spencer 

Albert Spencer 

John Singer 

Harry Sheppard 

Edw Smith, Jr 

Edw Spiller 

Chester Stone 

Newman Saunders 

Henry Sturgis 

Wm Sturgis 

Silas Stone 

Wm Stone, Jr 

James Sheppard 

Joseph Stinson 

Lewis Stone 

Geo Tibbetts 

Herbert Whitties 

Wilfred Wile 

Samuel White 

G Loring Woodbury 

Carl Woodbury 

Harry Wilkinson 

Lester Wood 

Daniel H Wells 

Collins York \ 

Angie P Brown, gravel 

Est George Harris, sand 



$ 68 


93 


1 03 


112 88 


207 CO 


9 84 


8 15 


2 25 


84 


1 03 


13 18 


6 18 


2 25 


3 09 


5 90 


7 61 


8 71 


4 88 


1 63 


3 09 


16 02 


2 53 


33 00 


6 75 


13 76 


5 15 


69 94 


126 U0 


3 09 


31 28 


11 90 


5 00 


$2126 98 



IPSWICH TOWN REPO 


RT. 




STABLE, 






Lathrop Brothers, horses 


$800 00 




Geo B Brown, grain 


408 49 




Wm G Horton, grain 


$561 82 




Ame & Co., 


3 25 




A Story Brown, hay 


108 53 




Est C A Campbell, hay 


125 03 




Samuel C Gordon, hay 


28 80 




John A Brown, hay 


40 14 




Chas G Day, hay 


51 47 




Town Farm, hay 


148 75 




S I Hudens, hay 


17 93 




Wm McCarthy, shoeing 


173 38 




Water Department, water 


42 21 




J J Merrill, supplies 


2 60 




George Hayes, plumbing 


20 00 




A J Brennan. plumbing 


4 55 




C F Chapman & Son, supplies 


98 29 




W A Snow Iron Works, supplies 


67 80 




W N Prescott, supplies 


2 90 




B J Conley, supplies 


5 00 




Geo B Robbins Co., supplies 


6 75 




W F Poole, supplies 


3 75 




E C Lord, pasturing horse 


4 00 




Chas S Moore, services 


5 00 




John W Goodhue, supplies 


67 




Hammatt Street Garage, supplies 


1 50 




Est J A Blake, supplies 


12 05 

(Pan a a no 



OTHER EXPENSES. 

Chas Jewett, labor $ 7 00 

Bay State St Ry Co., supplies 5 94 

Boston & Maine R R., freight 4 10 

Water Department, fountains 93 95 



36 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



C S Tyler, supplies 
Peoples Express Co,, express 
A C Damon, supplies 
A I Savory, supplies 



Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



$ 30 
1 35 

$2 40 
32 16 

$ 


147 20 


$19712 34 
106 43 



$19818 77 



Appropriation 




$18500 00 


Appropriation unpaid 1916 bills 


112 44 


Appropriation, December, 1917 


400 00 


Transfer from Reserve Fund 


400 00 


Refund— F L Burke Son, 


board of horses 


406 33 




ESSEX ROAD. 




LABOR AND TEAMS. 




Chester Patch 




$50 78 


Louis Martel 




13 38 


Edward Martel 




24 75 


Edward Bodwell 




9 97 


Collins York 




13 41 


Allan W Brown 




23 79 


Louis Kelley 




16 47 


Rees Jenkins 




49 50 


Samuel C Gordon 




10 50 


A Story Brown 




23 25 


A G Lauer 




9 28 


Carl A Caverly 




13 50 


Henry H Brown 




9 28 



$19818 77 



— $267 77 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 37 



Angie P Brown 


GRAVEL. 


$18 90 

$19 on 


Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 


$ 286 67 
2213 33 



$2500 00 



Balance from 1916 $1500 00 

Appropriation, 1917 1000 00 

$2500 CO 



38 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



CHARITIES. 



OUT POOR DEPARTMENT. 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATION. 



Frank T Goodhue, salary 


$100 00 


Chas G Hull, 


75 00 


John G Sperling. " 


62 50 


Walter F Gould, *' 


12 50 


Chas G Hull, agent 


200 01 


J H Lakeman, PM. ( postage 


11 87 


Hobbs & Warren, blanks 


2 12 


Chas G Hull, printing 


7 50 


New England T & T Co., telephone 


91 09 


David A Grady, auto hire 


9 50 


Albert F Welsh, legal services 


20 00 


E E Currier, auto hire 


3 00 


CASH ALLOWANCE. 




Various Persons, cash 


$2129 00 



$595 09 
$2129 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 39 



RENT. 
Nathaniel Burnham 
Wm A Chaplin 
Daniel O'Brien 
Walter F Gould 
I E B Perkins 



GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 
Tougas & Tougas 
Wm P Riley 
E E Gray Co 
W F Poole 
B Kippin 
G A Gauld 
Titcomb & Co 
L E Willcomb 
E E Howe 
John A Woleiko 
N J Bolles 



$ 11 08 


80 


00 


114 


00 


99 


00 


19 


50 



FUEL. 



Chas L Lovell 
A H Peatfield 
Lathrop Brothers 



$ 42 25 


161 03 


175 54 


40 12 


3 00 


3 02 


4 97 


63 00 


9 91 


21 00 


2 35 



BOARD AND CARE. 
Mamie E Kneeland $85 50 

Nora Minnihan 25 00 



$323 58 



$526 19 



$77 90 




32 90 




81 10 




■ 


$191 90 



$110 50 



■kO 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



MEDICINE AND MEDICAL ATTENDANCE. 



B J Conley 

Est J A Blake 

Ida A Buck 

F L Collins, M D 

Geo G Bailey, M D 

Geo E MacArthur, M D 

M C McGinley, M D 



$ 32 55 
36 60 
40 00 
46 75 
25 00 
12 00 
275 50 



— $468 40 



BURIALS. 



Ralph K Whittier 
E J M Scahill 



$40 00 
70 00 



INSTITUTIONS. 




Mass. General Hospital 


$17 00 


Beverly Hospital 


85 25 


Salem Hospital 


50 00 


Benjamin Stickney Cable Hospital 


55 00 


OTHER CITIES AND TOWNS. 


City of Lynn 


$102 00 


" " Revere 


85 89 


" " Boston 


25 71 


" " Gloucester 


58 82 


Town of Danvers 


34 00 


" West Newbury 


156 01 


MOTHERS' AID. 




Various Persons, local cases 


$1487 00 


Town of Ashland 


167 34 


" " Rowley 


262 66 


" " West Newbury 


80 00 



$110 on 



$207 25 



$462 43 



1997 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 41 



OTHER EXPENSES. 




E J M Scahill, auto hire 


$ 46 50 


D A Grady, 


12 00 


J J Bresnahan, Jr., auto hire 


4 00 


C S Tyler, supplies 


12 75 


First Dept Store Co., supplies 


23 88 


S H Thurston, supplies 


5 00 


Town Farm Dept., transfer 


200 00 

<?9fM 1« 



Total expenditures $7425 47 

Unexpended balance 316 09 



$7741 56 
Appropriation $7350 00 

Appropriation unpaid 1916 bills 391 56 

$7741 56 

Receipts to the credit of this department for the year have 
been as follows : 

Town of Newbury $ 10 00 

City of Salem 8 00 

Com. of Mass., Temporary Aid cases 66 00 

i " " " Mothers' Aid cases 344 67 

$428 67 

$632 27 



Accounts due and unpaid : 
Com. of Mass., Temporary Aid cases $286 60 

" " " Mothers' Aid cases 345 67 



Total income $1060 94 

Expended 1917 . $7425 47 

Income 1060 94 



Net expense $6364 53 

During the year the following old accounts have been re- 
ceived : 

Com. of Mass,, Temporary Aid cases $127 50 

" " " Mothers' Aid cases 104 00 

$231 50 



42 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Town Farm Department 



SALARIES AND WAGES, 



J H Gidney, Superintendent 

EI Holland, 

Elwood M Gidney, labor 

M E Gidney, 

Delta M Powell, 

Thos Wilkinson, 

Bert Goodhue, 

Frank W Thompson 

Stanley Hull, 

Hugh Gwinn, 

Lawrence Gwinn, 

Harry Rutherford, 

Geo F Gwinn, 

Chas R Davis, 

Margaret A Holland, 

Mary McPherson, 



GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 

Grand Union Tea Co $ 26 75 

L E Willcomb 30 17 

B Kippin 17 54 



$560 00 


100 00- 


243 56 


152 00 


200 00 


5 76 


6 40 


36 00 


27 00 


23 19 


4 50 


2 00 


2 00 


12 00 


35 00 


30 00 



$1439 41 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Ipswich Fish Market 
Tougas & Tougas 
■G A Gauld 
W S Atkinson 
Justin E Hull 
Marcourelle Bros 
Win P Reilly 
W F Poole 
N J Bolles 
Ohas Canelos 
Edw L Blaisdeli 
Titcomb & Co 
H C Atkinson 
James Averoff 
Miley Soap Co 
C Amazeen & Co 
James G Paganis 



DRY GOODS AND CLOTHING, 

First Dept Store Co 
C S Tyler 



FUEL AND LIGHT, 



Hiller & Co 
Louis H Bixby 



A H Peatfield 
Lathrop Bros 
Chas L Lovell 
Standard Oil Co 



EQUIPMENT AND REPAIRS, 
Canney Lumber Co,, lumber $ 31 82 

Zina Goodell, repairs 2 39 

C C Caldwell's Garage, repairs 4 65 

A C Damon, supplies 31 2 



$ 7 86 


123 89 


61 24 


6 09 


6 00 


51 09 


101 19 


37 65 


62 10 


39 00 


10 41 


17 30 


1 90 


28 00 


21 00 


7 20 


3 45 


G, 

$75 16 


1 42 


4 44 


6 00 


$37 12 


56 10 


28 80 


12 00 



$659 83 



$87 02 



$134 02 



OT 



44 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



C F Chapman & Son supplies 44 90 

R L Purinton, plumbing 99 95 

Mayer & Porter, supplies and repairs 131 33 

John W Goodhue, supplies 85 35 

Joseph A King, repairs 52 50 

Chas R Davis, auto 250 00 

J A Farley & Co., supplies 92 59 

Standard Oil Co., " 64 63 

Upland Farms, " 3 00 

E E Currier, " 48 56 

Hammatt Street Garage, supplies 10 92 

W J Norwood, " 4 50 

C S Tyler. " 30 

A I Savory, " 6 05 

Est J A Blake, " 30 



GRAIN. 



Wm G Horton 
Geo 3 Brown 



OTHER EXPENSES. 
Geo E Safford & Co., pigs 
John Roberts, pigs 
S S Gray, pigs 
Stanley Jaslovitch, pigs 
Dr H D Lambert, Adm., services 
Edmund Wile, teaming 
Ernett Lemay, shoeing 
B F Conley, medicine 
Walter F Gould, team 
Fred Buzzell, labor 
Philip E Clarke, burial 
J H Gidney, cash paid out 
D A Grady, auto hire 



$965 01 



$364 50 


268 30 

<Pfioo on 


<pOO£ ou 


$15 00 


16 00 


16 00 


2 00 


2 50 ' 


27 38 


34 95 


33 23 


I 00 


4 00 


43 00 


7 00 


3 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 45 



Damon & Damon, insurance 

Dr E J Smith, services 

H W Phillips, supplies 

Est J A Blake, medicine 

E I Holland, cash paid out . 

Brown Drug Co., medicine 

ChasG Hull, printing 

M C McGinley, M D., medical attendance 



41 02 


5 00 


14 00 


1 00 


3 16 


8 15 


4 00 


4 20 



$285 59 



Total expenditures $4203 68 

Unexpended balance 68 Q6 



$4272 34 



Appropriation $3600 00 

Appropriation unpaid 1916 bills 72 34 

Transfer from Reserve Fund 400 00 

Transfer from Out Poor Department 20C 00 



$4272 34 



■in 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



INVENTORY -STOCK, TOOLS, ETC. AT TOWN FARM. 

Jan. 1, 1918. Jan. 1, 1917. 





NO. 


value 


NO. 

7 


VALUE 

$700 00 


GAIN 


LOSS 


Cows 


10 


$1000 00 


3(>0 | 


Bull 


1 


75 00 


1 


35 


4U 00 




Heifers 


4 


200 00 


6 


250 00 




$50 00 


H orses 


2 


600 00 


2 


600 00 






Pigs and Shoats 


2 


25 00 


6 


75 00 




50 00 


Fowl 


18 


20 00 


30 


30 00 




10 00 


Carts and Wagons 


8 


475 00 


8 


475 00 






Mowing Machine 


1 


45 00 


1 


45 On 






Plows 


2 


25 00 


3 


25 00 






( ultivators 


2 


20 00 


3 


30 00 




10 00 


Horse Hoe 


1 


5 00 


1 


5 00 






Horse Hay Fork 


1 


50 00 


1 


50 00 






Harrows 


4 


50 00 


4 


50 00 






Sled 


1 


15 00 


1 


15 00 






Drags 


1 


6 00 


2 


6 50 




50 


Wood, cords 


4 


40 00 


12 


108 00 




68 00 


Coal, tons 


1 


9 50 






9 50 




Groceries and Provisions 




110 00 




125 00 




15 00 


Dairy Utensils 




15 00 




15 00 






Furniture and Bedding 




500 00 




500 00 






Range and Fixtures 




110 00 




110 00 






Stoves and Furnace 




150 00 




150 (i0 






Tedder 


1 


15 00 


1 


15 00 






Tools 




10 00 




10 00 






Blocks and Ropes 




5 00 




R 00 






Ice Chest 


1 


36 00 


1 


36 On 






Harnesses and Blankets 




75 00 




75 00 






Potato Digger 


1 


1 00 


1 


1 00 






Wheelbarrows 


2 


10 00 


1 


4 ^0 


5 50 




Lumber 




25 00 




30 00 




5 00 


Double Bob 


1 


20 00 


1 


20 00 






Brooder 






1 


5 00 




5 00 


Seed Sower 


2 


10 00 


2 


10 00 






Wood Saw 


1 


50 00, 1 


50 00 






Hogs 


1 


75 00 




75 00 




Hay Rake 


1 


21 00 


1 


21 00 






Pump Jack 


1 


14 00 


1 


14 00 






Auto Truck 


1 


200 00 






200 00 




Oil Tanks 


2 


15 00 






15 00 




Total 


$4127 50 


$3696 00. 


645 00 


213 50 



IPSW'IGH TOWN REPORT. 



IT 



INVENTORY— PRODUCE, ETC, AT TOWN FARM. 
Jan. 1, 1918. Jan. 1, 1917. 



! NO. 



Beans, bushels 
Potatoes, bushels 
Roots, bushels 
English Hay, tons 
Salt Hay, tons 
Mulch, tons 
Squash 

Vinegar, barrels 
Salt Pork, ms 
Grain 

Total 
Inventory, stock, tools,etc 



Net Loss 



I 2 
20 

I 6 
25 

6 

2 

125 



VALUE NO. 



$16 00 2 

30 00 40 

6 0015 

500 00 40 

30 

30 00, 1 

4 oo; 

45 00j 3 
42 50 200 

25 U0! 



S 698 50! 
4127 50 



$4826 00; 



VALUE 



$13 00 

70 00 

30 00 

800 On 

240 00 

6 00 

15 00 
35 00 



$1209 00 
3696 00 



$49u5 CO 
4826 00 



S79 Of) 



! GAIN 


j LOSS 


$3 Of 






$40 00 




| 24 00 




300 0U 




240 00 


! 24 00 




4 00 




i 30 0(> 




7 5< ! 




25 Oi' 




•>93 50 


604 00 


645 00 


213 50 


738 50817 




738 50 




79 00 



Summary of Income and Expenditures at the Farm for the Years 
1913. 1914. 1915, 1916 and 1917. 




Expended 
Income 

Net Expense 



!!$4220 31i'$3083 81||$3640 06!!$3823 47ji$4203 68 
867 211! 1137 5911 872 051) 167.7 6 

2526 62 



2216 (6]| 2216 6oj| 2502 47T295T42J 



Number of inmates at Farm Jan. 1, 1918, 

Average number of inmates at Farm during the year, 

Average cost per week for each inmate, 

Sales for year 1917, 

Due from sales, 

Total income for the year 1917, 

Amount collected on old accounts, 



10 


9 


$5 40 


$1597 21 


79 85 


$1677 06 


$473 98 



48 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



SOLDIERS' BENEFITS. 

STATE AID. 



Various Parties, cash 
Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



Appropriation 



$2061 91 



$2500 00 



$2061 91 
438 09 



$2500 00 
$2500 00 



SOLDIERS' RELIEF. 

Various Parties, cash 

Appleton Farms, fuel 

L E Willcomb, groceries 

Tougas & Tougas, groceries 

Mrs M Marcourelle, groceries 

Geo E MacArthur, M D,, medical attendance 

Collins York, labor 

Philip E Clarke, burial 

Total expenditures 

Unexpended balance 



Appropriation 

Appropriation unpaid 1916 bills 



$713 00 

15 00 

108 00 

71 99 

144 12 

55 25 

1 54 

50 00 





$1158 90 




352 35 




$1511 25 


$1500 00 




11 25 






$1511 25 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



49 



RECREATION, 



PARKS. 



Frank T Goodhue, labor 

Chas H Wells, 

Manzer & Damon, 

J Frank Goodhue, 

Ernest Dort, 

S C Gordon, 

Wm P Reilly, seed 

Est C A Campbell, plants 

Joseph Breck & Sons, plants 

Geo E Marsh Co., fertilizer 

Water Dept., waier 

A I Savory, supplies 

C F Chapman & Son, supplies 

Chas L Lovell, cement 

L E Wood, trucking 

Canney Lumber Co., lumber 

Total expenditures 

Unexpended balance 



Appropriation 

PLAY GROUNDS. 
Canney Lumber Co., lumber 
Water Department, water 
Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



Appropriation 



$ 53 43 




122 50 




7 69 




20 16 




2 50 




7 25 




4 3) 




52 70 




29 05 




11 25 




6 00 




22 83 




1 75 




2 75 




3 41 




2 23 






$349 80 






20 




$350 00 




$'350 CO 


$15 19 




2 75 






$17 94 






7 06 




$25 00 




$25 00 



"0 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

UNCLASSIFIED. 

MEMORIAL DAY. 

Gen James Appleton Post, GAR $250 00 

Total expenditures 

Appropriation 

SHELL FISH. 
E Warren Dodge, salary 
Henry A Churchill, salary 
Farley C Lord, salary 
Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



Appropriation 

WATER FRONT IMPROVEM 
Geo Brockelbank, labor 
Joseph A King, labor 
Canney Lumber Co., lumber 
A I Savory, supplies 
Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



Appropriation 



TOWN SCALES. 



C A Hatch, carpentry 

Manzer & Damon, carpentry 

A J Barton & Son, labor 

A D Mallard, trucking 

Edw W Perkins Lumber Co., lumber 

American Express Co., express 

Total expenditures 

Appropriation 





$250 00 




$250 00 


$60 00 




60 00 




60 00 






$180 00 






20 00 




$200 00 




$200 00 


NT. 
$18 00 




5 26 




18 59 




12 81 






$54 66 






45 34 




$100 00 




$100 00 


$12 75 




18 17 




17 85 




5 87 




6 45 




1 10 




— — 


$62 19 




$62 19 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 51 



PUBLI SAFETY COMMITTEE 
Chas L Henley, labor and teaming 
Ipswich Chronicle, printing 
Military Pub Co., books 
Edmund Vv ile, teaming 
C L Lovell, teaming 
Ipswich Mills, lumber 
University Press, printing 
H N Doughty, postage 
Alice F Blood, chart 
Canney Lumber Co., lumber 
Ipswich Military Band, music 
A C Damon, supplies 
Elizabeth E Nutter, instruction 
Essex Co. Kood Production and Conservation Com. 
Measures Co., supplies 
N -J Bolles, supplies 

Mass. Soldiers' Information Bureau, cards 
H A Russell, meals 
George Hayes, plumbing 

POTATO COMMITTEE. 

George Hodgdon, manure 

Felix Wegzen, manure and labor 

('has L Henley, labor and teaming 

J A Farley Co., potatoes 

Wm G Horton fertilizer 

Frank H Burnham, labor 

Antone Burek, labor 

John Singer, labor 

-lohn A Brown, labor and teaming 

W Quincy Kinsman, labor and teaming 



Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



Appropriation 



$119 <0 
112 8> 




3 4S 




20 25 




16 88 




9 05 




15 75 




12 27 




1 50 




38 




20 00 




1 10 




133 83 




i. 1 29 




1 45 




S 29 




40 




24 40 




1 70 






$498 80 




60 00 




33 88 

66 53 

103 98 

33 75 

6 00 

6 50 

2 50 

48 40 

37 13 


$398 67 






$897 47 
2 53 




$900 00 
$900 00 



52 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Howard Blake, 

L A Lord, 

Edward N Martel, 

Howard J Blake. 

Chester Brockelbank, 

•Geo H Brockelbank, 

Forrest A Dow, 

Dalbert Kent, 

Star Princewood, 

Wm F Rutherford, 

Orrie M Hills, 

E J M Scahill, 

Philip E Clarke, 

-las H Hull, Jr., 

Geo H Burbidge, 

Napoleon Duval, 

Chas Jewett, 

Wm B Richards, 

Harold A Wilson, 

Louis Martel, 

H H Roper. teaming 

Lathrop Bros., 

Chas H Henley, 

Wilfred Wile, 

Edmund Wile. 

Wm P Reilly, supplies 

K B Tashjian, plants 

Mrs Geo E Barnard, plants 

E W Pearson, plants 

John W Goodhue, supplies 

A I Savory, 

R W Davis, 

Water Dept,, water 

R L Purinton, plumbing 

A J Brennan, 



labor 



$400 00 

278 33 

234 54 

80 00 

10 00 
20 00 
14 20 

16 54 
78 75 

37 41 
36 90 
75 00 
62 69 
14 04 
18 75 

17 17 

8 00 
4 5r 

11 25 
1 55 

24 50 
31 89 

18 00 
52 85 
18 00 

1 00 

2 00 

9 60 

38 00 
26 87 

6 00 
16 40 
68 75 

7 72 
6 49 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



m 



'Geo A Schofield & Son, printing 
Canney Lumber Co., lumber 
A I Savory, supplies 
Louis Nikalakakis, gravel 
Michael Ryan, 
Siffro Comeau, 

PERPETUAL CARE, 

A J Barton & Son, labor 
L A Lord, labor 
Howard Blake, labor 
Edw Bodwell, labor 
Everett Mclntire, labor 
Orrie M Hills, labor 
John H Baker, labor 
Carrie R Brown, flowers 
First National Bank, interest 



Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



1 25 


58 


4 65 


25 50 


4 20 


90 


$ 1 00 


139 00 


154 73 


7 U0 


3 90 


5 00 


SO 50 


3 00 


5 62 



$1784 77 



$349 75 

$2134 52 
15 23 







$2149 75 


Appropriation 


$1800 00 




Cemetery Trust Funds— Perpetual Care 


349 75 









$2149 75 


RESERVE FUND. 






Transferred to Selectmen's Dept 


$ 100 00 




" Treasurer and Collector's Dept 


300 00 




" Police Dept 


1200 00 




" Highway Dept 


400 00 




" Town Farm Dept 


400 00 




" Forest Warden's Dept 


15 00 




" Interest Account 


450 00 




Total amount 'transferred 


< 


$2865 00 


Unexpended balance 




135 00 




$3000 00 


Appropriation 




$3000 00 



u 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



>- 
c3 

co 



69 



as 



CD 

E 



CO 

o 

"■*— » 
cs 



a> 
c 

si 



13 

co 

13 

c 

CO 

a 
fa 



oi 

o 

&H 



2 2 

o3 d 

11 



CO 



c 

< 



s- 
a 

co 



CDLO©LOOOO©OOr,n 
t-OCMC-OOOOLOZZ 



i— CD CM 
CD IC OO 



CD LO 
CD C j 



00 <X> 
CO CD 



r~. 



CM 



69- 



04 



© lo 

i-n CD 



05 (M r , H co co 
W H [q C5 h (M 



oo as --tf 1 co oo cd 

Li. CD UO t— ( CD — 



CM 
CM 



CO 



CM s 



CM CD — LO a ^ I— 



CM 



CM 
-M 



€/3- 



t- CM O i-l 

tr 1 LO ^ t— t _ 

^ " » X lO lO h 

H M CO 



CO OS CM lo go 

cr h k i • as 



cm Lo So 



T* 


00 


i— I 


^r 


__ 


CO 


r- 


00 


h- 


T* 


CD 


fc- 


co 


CM 


CD 


CD 


CL. 


t 


r— 


r— 1 


Tt 


. — 


^ 


Tf 


CD 


CO 


io 


^— 


o 




rr 


r— ' 


CD 


on 


CT 


-M 




CM 


r-H 


CO 


LO 
CO 


00 


CM 


On! 





SO 

a: 



o 
o 



COO©lOlO© l oO,-^ 

MOX!NM^^^O 



CO © 

CO LO 
CM ^ 

CM *-t 
€/3- 



o 
o 



o 
o 



coocDcoasLOroOw^ 

lc x f- co m tt r n w io ^ 

CO CO CM Lo CD 



CM 
CM 



© 
o 



o 
o 



CO 
U2 






•CO 00 
00 



H V ifl OS iO 



M t- N ^T 



CO LO 



CM 
CM 



T3* 



o 

o 



&9- 



O 

o 

o 

© 

CO 



o 
o 

o 
o 

<M 



© 
o 



LO 



© 

CD 
© 



CO 
CO 

© 
© 

00 



© 
© 

© 

CO 



tD©^© ^^©!/:©^ 
^©cc©©^cottSc5^© 

^©^©©^©lOcmO^-, 
COLOLOCD^^LO^^cr.giOLO^COCMocM^- 

<M ,-! CO CO MrrCC H CMC0^l : OH lO C|> 

€/9- CM CO t- CM CO £— 



ChOCD^o^CC 
O-'OlO'sfcMiC 

lg 23 £ © 



be 
c 

•P-4 

4-3 

c 

13 
O 

O 

o 

< 

C 
c * 

CO fc* 

£ .S 

t£ 

co 73 

CO < 



o 

S 

to to 

«B CO 

co co 

H < 



O 

c 



H fa 



c 

# o 

♦ » 

03 

'5b 

C 
ccS 

C 

.° 

CO 

co 






o 



o 



I- 

o o . 
Eh CU fe 



c 

CO 

13 

- 

cd 

-;- 

0) 

- 
o 

fa 



DQ 
CU 

X 

cd 

(V 



13 



T3 £ 
as oj v, 

J- g « fa 
cu ^3 -t; cu > 
^ § H ffi K fa E- 



03 
m 

bC JZ 

CU o 



c 
c 

fa 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



£5 



C 

c3 

PQ 



— . lo <-< o <r> 

O CO CD (N o 

00 CM lO Cr- 

CO lO - 1 

-* CO CM 



O "^ CO CO CO 

O CO lO CM <Ji 

O LO CM UO CO 

CM ^T r-i t— I 



o 



tO 
CO 



T5 
CD 

a 

CD 

a 



r-lOiOO-tO^^t-CMt-OO 

Hooic^t-oo^t-^-om 

C£)iOM^HiOXiOO»M(N050 
OrHCMCO CM--- 00 *-< CM O 00 

CM r-H CO CM t- CM CM 

^ f-l 



OS 

o 
c-i 



S3 

OS 



CD 
° CQ 



S3 

CD 






OLCCDOOOOOO 
OCM00OOOO _ O 



lO O O O 
C— lO O O 



Ot— lOOLOOOOOOiUOoO 
O H O lO (N lO C C^O"*COOO 
lO lO t CO WWHQHOJ tO 

CM »-h CO CM t- CM CO 



to o 

t- o 

a o 

-^ LO 

co n< 



o 

%-> 
a 
a 

< 



OLO'iOOOOOOOOOOO 
O (N 00 OOOOOOOLOOO 



O i-H 



LO LO "* CO 



ooloooooo 

LOLOCMLOOOOO 



CM 



CO 



CM CM 



LO 
00 



o o 

o o 



ooot>oo 

ID CM CO 



S3 
CD 

a 

$-4 

a 

CD 

Q 



CD 

05 



3 - 



+3 

<3 



95 



m 

S3 
S3 

o 
O 



Q 



S3 

(D 9t 

O ^ c3 . 
CO wHPh Ph 



S3 
CD 

a 

CD 
> 
O 

a 

a 



C3 cp 



O 
03 



CD 
CD 



a 
a 

o 
O 



S3 

.2 .2 fe & 







S3 



5 ; ; - 



+3 

■P 3 « 
® b U 



oo IPSWICH TOWN REPOR' 



ASSESSORS REPORT, 

APPROPRIATIONS. 

Memorial Day $ 250 00 

Play Grounds 25 00 

Averoff Wharf 100 00 

Essex Road 1000 00 

Selectmen's Department 1950 00 

Auditing and Accounting 1450 00 

Treasurer and Collector's Department 3130 00 

Assessors Department 860 00 

Law 500 00 

Town Clerk 560 00 

Election and Registration 650 00 

Town House 2060 00 

Police 4500 00 

Fire Department 6800 00 

Forest Warden 100 00 

Tree Warden 400 00 

Parks 350 00 

Weights and Measures 225 00 

Health Department 3450 00 

Highways 17000 00 

Snow 1500 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



57 



Soldiers' Relief 

State Aid 

Cemeteries 

Poor Department 

Town Farm 

Notes Payable 

Interest 

Schools 

Light - Depreciation 

Clam Commissioners 

Public Safety Commission 

Gypsj> Moth 



$1500 00 


25130 00 


1800 00 


7350 00 


3600 00 


120(0 00 


6785 50 


43000 00 


2450 00 


200 00 


900 00 


2419 40 


£13:364 90 



Total appropriations 

County Tax 

State Tax 

State Highway Tax 

Auditing- by Bureau of Statistics 

Overlay 



Estimated income 

Amount assessed on Polls and property 
" 1493 Polls 
Property 



$131364 90 

9144 93 

12870 00 

2210 00 

177 11 

1500 00 



$157266 94 
38847 34 

$118419 60 

2986 00 

115433 60 



Amount of Personal estate assessed 

" " Real 
Value of Buildings assessed 
"' " Land 



$1140533 
4380456 
304(600 
1339856 



:s 



IPSWICH TOWN LLIORT. 



Numbej of souses ass e 

v OWS 

Sheep 

other neat c\ tssessed 

swine assessed 
fowl assessed 
acres of land assessed 
persons assessed 

on property 
" poll only 
dwelling houses 
Rate of Taxation, $21 00 on $1000. 

Additional assessments in December 
Personal property 
Real estate 
Tax on December assessments 



.90 
.97 

I\one 

140 

78 

4840 

17645 

2213 

1225 

983 

1294 



$ 715 00 

7270 00 

167 69 



The amount received from the ^tate out of its collections un- 
der the new Income Tax law is at this date (Feb. 1, 1918) $12125.33. 
a sum which approximates closely to the amount that would have 
been assessed on personal property lost by reason of the new law 7 
from the local assessment. But the provisions of that law are such 
that the increase of assessed personal property from 1915 to 1916 
will probably result in the Town receiving a larger sum from the 
Commonwealth in 1918. 

JOHN W. NOURSE, / Assessors 

WILLIAM B. RICHARDS, - of 
RIlHARD R. GLASIER, \ Ipswich. 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 5) 



POLICE REPORT. 

Board of Selectmen, 
Gentlemen: — 

I herewith submit the annual report of the Police Depart- 
ment for the year ending December 31, 1917. 

Total number of arrests, 581 

By months — January 24, February 37, March 11, April 14, 
May 88, June 53, July 96, August 86, September 54, October 57, 
November 27, December 34. 

CLASSIFICATION OF CRIME. 

Attempt to rape, 3 

Assault and battery, 27 

Assault on officer, 2 

Bastardy, 1 

Breach of Peace, 9 

Carrying concealed weapon, 1 

Drunkenness, 387 

Deserter from Camp Devens, 1 

Breaking and entering, 6 

Fraud, 1 



00 IPSWICH TOWN RKPORT. 



Gaming", 


11 


Larceny, 


21 


Lewd cohabitation, 


4 


Liquor nuisance, 


4 


Keeping gaming house, 


1 


Keeping liquor with intent to sell, 


2 


Illegal sale of liquor, 


9 


Interfering with officer, 


1 


Indecent language, 


2 


Operating auto without license, 


6 


Operating auto under influence of liquor, 


11 


Non-support, 


6 


Receiving stolen goods, 


1 


Vagrants, 


30 


Violating food law, 


3 


Violating school law, 


2 


Violating labor law, 


2 


Violating traffic rules, 


17 


Violating fish and game law, 


9 


Violating Town By-Laws, 


1 




581 


Crimes against persons, 


33 


Crimes against property, 


29 


Crimes against public order, 


519 




581 


DISPOSITION OF CASES. 




Committed to State Farm, 


1 


Committed to House of Correction, 


122 


Fined, 


262 


Probated, 


m 


Discharged, 


39 


Filed, 


37 


Appealed, 


7 


Suspended, 


3 


Defaulted, 


4 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 61 

Held for Grand Jury, 4 

Continued, 18 

Released, 15 



Total, 581 ' 

Value of property reported stolen, $ 467 00 

Value of property recovered, 408 00 

Value of property reported lost, 35 00 

Value of property recovered, 23 00 

MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS, 

Accidents reported, 21 

Buildings found open and secured, 9 

Complaints investigated, 125 

Dogs killed, 16 

Insane persons committed, 6 

Lost children restored, 2 

Injured and sick persons assisted, 4 

Dangerous dogs reported, 3 

Horses killed, 1 

Dead bodies cared for, 5 

Arrests for out of town officers, 2 

Electric Lights reported out, 61 

Amount of fines received from the Third District Court, $1511 79. 

In closing my report I wish to express my thanks to the Board 
of Selectmen, Judge Geo. H. W. Hayes and other officials of the 
Court, Town Counsel Albert F. Welsh, and to tne officers and all 
others who have assisted the department during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN F. DUPRAY, 

Chief of Police, 



62 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



ENGINEERS' REPORT. 

To the Selectmen of Ipswich: 

Following- is the report of the Board of Engineers of the Fire 

Department for the year ending Dec. 31, 1917: 

Number of men in the Department, 40 

" " box alarms, 14 

" still alarms, 55 

Total number of alarms, 69 

Number of feet of hose laid, 5950 feet 

Property threatened by fire, $56250 00 

Insurance on same, 43650 00 

Insurance paid, 5523 00 

Property loss, 6373 00 

Value of department equipment, $15000 00 

" buildings occupied by department, 20' 00 U() 

" Fire Alarm equipment, 3500 00 

DEPARTMENT EQUIPMENT. 

Steamer, 1 

Hook & Ladder, 1 

Auto-Combination Chemical and Hose, 1 

Hose Wagons, 2 

Hose Reels, 4 

Fire Alarm Boxes, 19 

Number feet of hose, 6000 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT.- 63 

To U:e property owners wish t your attention to the 

facts that the majnrity uoi fi re iu>,ed by defective chimneys 

and rubbish* See that youi chin . e; are ii ep cted and cleaned at least 

twice a year Do not let ru : ars and yards, dis- 

pone of it often; as it is one o - * tire menaces wa Lave, espec- 

ially in the b isiness district Vi is to be done, we 

would recommend the use of ingles be disco:.: :. i; all r he-e 

things are considered by insurance companies, if you wish to keep your 
rate down, it is for you to see thi : aditions are bettered in this 

respect. 

We wish to report that Are Lave moved the jumper house from 
the land of Gustavus Kin&mai on Pi-} re btieet to the lard of A. Stcry 
Brcwn in Candle wood, to house the jumper in that district. 

Owing to the condition of the steamer at the present time, and 
beh ised by the builder not to expend any more on it. in its present 

condition, as the only thing advisable to do, would be to equip with a 
new boiler at a probable cost of $1000. Rather than to expend that 
amount on the steamer, we would recommend that the town pur- 
chase a triple combination, pump, chemical and hose of modern tvpe. 

ARTHUR H, WALTON, / 

EDWIN M. POOLE, • Engineers. 

WALTER G. BROWN, \ 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

For The Year 1917. 



The report this year will be brief in order to save space. We 
have followed and developed the policy adopted five years ago with in- 
creasing good results. More time has been given to the work the past 
year than ever before. This year it is proposed to keep all reeord^ of 
work done in card index files in order that all divisions may be better 
co ordinated. This already being done by the Milk Inspectioa and 
Infant Welfare Divisions The reports of the Agent and Milk Inspector 
give summaries of the work done by them, Tho report of the Division 
of Infant Welfare is also condensed as far as possible consistant with 
giving an idea of what has been done. 

Following is a list of Diseases dangerous to the Public Health 
reported in 1917: 

Chicken Pox 69 

Diphtheria 12 

German Measles 3 

Lobar Pneumonia 5 

Measles 57 

Mumps 3 

Opthalmia Neonatorum 2 

Scarlet Fever 4 

Tuberculosis 12 

Typhoid Fever 6 

Whooping Cough 1 

Total 174 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 65 

Of the tubercular cases eight were pulmonary and four oth r 
forms. We have seat these cases to sanatoria as far as possible, and 
when this for various reasons could not be done they have been follow- 
ed up in their homes by the Welfare Nurse and her associates. We 
hope the coming year to follow up these cases as systematically as we 
are now following up Child ' We'fare, which was our most pressing 
problem, and which we believe we now have well in hand. 



AGENT'S REPORT. 

Whole number of complaints received aud investigated 57 

Number of Contagious Cards po-ted 61 

Number of dead animals buried or otherwise cared for 20 



Dogs 7 

Cats 5 

Hens 6 

Cows 2 

Total 20 

You will se? that the number of complaints received is some- 
what largei than the previous year owing to the fact of the condition 
which has existed at Brownville district whioh condition was caused by 
the owners of this property having on-; large cesspool located for all 
these houses and having sold the land upon which same was located 
thereby shutting off their right to enter their sewage to this cess-pool. 
In consequence of which all the trouble was caused which was to the 
effect that all of the sewerage empt'ed into the cellars of these houses 
and to avoid an epidemic the Board was obliged to take drastic meas- 
ures which they did at once. 

This property has now changed hands and the new owners have 
shown a ready disposition to aid the Board in every way and at 
once adopted the recommendations as suggested and now the sanitary 
conditions will compare favorably with any part of the town. 

Respectfully submitted, 

AARON LORD, Agent. 



66 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

REPORT OF MILK INSPECTOR. 

In submitting my report for the year 1917,1 would say that 
there seems to be nothing to add to what I have stated iii my previous 
reports, as facts speak for ilumselves and, as no complaints have been 
reported to me during the year, as regards the quality of the milk snp- 
phed is proof in itself ; of the purity of the siime and shows that the 
producers are, living up to the high- standard which they believe to be 
for the interest of the consumers as well as for themselves. In my in- 
spection of these barns and milk rooms, I found the same care had 
been taken lo keep them in the same clean and sanitary condition as in 
the past, which certainly can but be highly pleasant to all concerned. 

In my inspection of all places where ice cream is sold, I also 
found the same caie was being taken to keep everything in a clean and 
sanitary condition as has been done in the past 

Number of milk licenses issued 27 

" ice cream licenses issued 13 

Oleomargerine dealers registered 8 

Amount received from all license fees $21.50 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE W, SMITH, Milk Inspector. 
Ipswich, Jan. 21. 1918. 

Preventive work is the leynole in health administration today' 
The lines laid down by the State Department 1 of Health are bread and 
constructive, and we aie endeavoring in every possible way to build up 
our department n conformity with these idtas. All bills against the 
department have been paid and there is left in the Treasury a balance 
of $69 35. We ask for the year of 1918 an appropriation of $3500 00. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEO. E, MacARTHUR, M. D., ) Board 
AARON LORD, \ of 

GEO, W. SMITH, \ Health. 

Ipswich, Feb. 1st, 1918. 

Division of Child Welfare. Report of Director. 

A summary is herewith presented of the Infant Welfare work 
arried on in Ipswich for the year 1917. In crder to make this sum- 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 67 

mary plain for purposes of comparison I will quote certain statistical 
facts pertaining to Infant Mortality for the five years 1912-1916 in- 
clusive. 

Much has been said and published about the high infant mortali- 
ty rate in Ipswich and figures have been given, but thus far nobody has 
come forward wi<h an anlay?es of these figures It is my purpose to 
make certain analysis and deductions and for that reason I am giving 
the figures above referred to As a result of intensive study of the 
causes of death I have grouped, the diseases under four different classes 
as follows : 

Class 1. Congenital Heart Disease. Premature Birth. Still- 
born. 

" 2. Broncho-Pulmonary Diseases. 

" 3. G astro-Intestinal Diseases. 

" 4. Unclassified Diseases 

Conditions under 1 and 4 average about the same the year 
round. 2 and 3 are seasonal diseases, 2 prevailing in winter and 3 in 
summer. It is obvious from these facts that these diseases must be 
studied from four different angles. This I have done, and shall point 
out my deductions later in this report when all the facts have been sub- 
mitted. 

During that five years there were 517 deaths of all ages. Of 
these 147 were under one year of age. This is about 28 per cent, 
which is of course high. 

Here follow figures for the deaths of these years under the above 
classification : 



1912 1913 1914 1915 1916. 



Class 1 
Class 2 
Class 3 
Class 4 


8 

5 

16 

3 


15 
7 

12 



12 
5 
6 
4 


8 

3 

12 




14 
4 

7 
3 


32 34 
Total for the five years 


27 


23 


28 



57 
24 
53 
10 



144 

The number of cases in each class for the five years is as follows 
Class 1 57 

Class 2 24 

Class 3 53 

Class 4 10 



68 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



This shows that 134 cnses, or all but 10 were classed under the 
first three headings. It also shows that onty two cases per j^ear on the 
average tell outside the first three classes This made very distinct 
angles from which to work in 1917, which brings us to the considera- 
tion of this year's work 

During the year there have been 24 deaths. In class 1 there 
were fifteen, in class 2 seven, in class 3 NONE, and in class 4 two. We 
made a special drive in class 3 and for the first time in any year of 
whico we have a record there were NO DEATHS in that class. Dur- 
ing the season in which the deaths in class 2 occurred no Welfare work 
was being done WV are now making a drive in class 2, and with the 
facilities at hand we may confidently expect good results. In class 1 
the prospect of immediate results is not encouraging, but it is not hooe- 
kss The causes of the high rate there are many and complex and it 
will doubtless be some time before we can make much of a dent in it. 
It is obvious that pit-i atal work among prospective mothers is the 
only channel open for the attack upon that problem, and that work is 
now going on Our Nurse is sending the names of prospective mothers 
to the State Department of Health from which they receive regularly a 
series of instructive letters during the pre-natal period. She is trying 
to teach them the right way tc live in order that they may bear good, 
healthy babies. She is trying to teach them to employ physicians instead 
of mid-wives in confinement, which many of them do following a custom 
prevelent in continental Europe from which the most of them came. 
That practice is doubtless the cause of a matt rial percentage of still- 
births, and those who engage in it are really practicing medicine con- 
trary to Law. and are liable to heavy fines for such practice. 

Much credit is due Miss Stewart for her faithful and efficient 
work among the children and her instructions to the mothers as to how 
the children should be fed and cared for. It certainiy shows results in 
clean slate which has been produced in elass 3. 

From May fifteenth when the service began until December. 
3)st. 2354 visits were made 1o babies in their homes and 88 hours time 
was given to work in the dispensary between July and October. There 
are at present 253 children under the care of the Nurse in their homes 

Respectfully Submitted, 

CEO. E. MacARTHER. M. D., Director. 
Ipswich, Feb. 1, 1918. 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 69 



REPORT OF THE OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

OUT POOR DEPARTMENT. 

The detailed financial statement of this department published in 
another part of this book shows the following totals: — 

Appropriation for 1917 $7350 00 

Appropriation to cover unpaid bills of 1916, 
coming in after Jan. 1 of last year, 391 56 



Total appropriation for 1917 7741 56 

Total expenditures for 1917 7425 47 

Unexpended balance returned to Town Treasury, 316 09 

To find the actual cost of this department to the Town for 1917, 
we must deduct the following from the total expenditures: — 

Total expenditures, $7425 47 

Reimbursements from other cities and towns, $428 67 
Reimbursement due from State, 632 27 

Transfered to Farm account, 200 00 

$1260 94 



Total cost to town, $6164 53 



TO IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

We know of no unpaid bills against this department 

This creditable showing we know will be a source of much gratifi- 
ration to the tax-pa\er. It has not been brought about by niggardliness 
en the part of the Oversee7-s. The worthy poor have not been allowed 
to suffer for lack of necessities, but due attention has been paid to all 
eases and relief afforded in proportion to need. Careful investigation, 
however, has been made, close supervision maintained, work found 
whenever possible for the unemployed, children encouraged to render as- 
sistance to the family, non-support cases brought before the court, and 
aid discontinued as soon as necessity has ceased to exist. It is felt that 
the work of this department \ullmoie than favorably compare with that 
of other towns cf similar circumstances 

Prospects for the coming year, however, are not so bright as 
could be desired. While the cost of necessities is high, and liable to be still 
higher unless the government afforcs relief, the curtailing of the hours of 
labor is liable to create distress which this department must find a way 
to allevinte. Several cases have been added t the number since Jan,. 
1st, and it is anticipated that others will follow. To meet this need the 
Overseers have found it necessary to recommend an appropriation of 
SS000.00, which the}' trust will prove sufficient. 

ALMSHOUSE. 

The figures for the Almshouse were as follows: — 

Appropriation, $3672 34 

Transfer from Reserve Fund, 400 00 

Transfer from Out Poor Dept., 200 00 



$4272 34 
Total expenditures, 4203 68 



Total reverting to Town Treasury $68 66 

There are no unpaid bills. 

While the inventory has remained about stationary, the Farm 
sales of 1917 were practically double those of 1916. The net cost of the 
Farm is as follows: — 

Total expenditures 1917, $4203 68 

Total income 1917. . 1677 06 

Net expense, $2526 62 



IPSWICH TOWN KEPOKT. 71 

The net cosf of the Farm for 1917 was about $f,00. less than the 
previous year. It must be understood that the appropriation is all the 
money which the Overseers have to use for the Farm, the entire income 
being paid into the town treasury. By -careful management in 191 \ 
the Overseers have reason to expect that the income from Farm Sales 
will reach at least $2000. 

Affairs at the Farm are steadily moving in the right direction* 
We are raising our likely young stock and annually increasing by this 
means our herd of cows. To -save expense we are not feeding much 
grain. There is an abundance of pasture in the summer season, and 
nearly ail the feed in the winter is hay and roots. Another season will 
fill the barn with cows, giving more manure for the crops and top 
dressing for the hay land. This, together with the advanced price of 
milk, will afford considerable increase in income. When the tie-ups arc 
filled with cows, however, we will be facing the necessity cf an addition 
to the barn. 

For several years the State inspector has been strongly urging 
the installation of a telephone, saying that he would order the same had 
he the power to do so. We have secured an estinate of the cost of in- 
stalling a 'phone from the New England T. & T. Co., which together 
with the service charge amouits to substantially $325.00. The plan is 
to set a line of poles from the house to the nearest point on the rail- 
road, and then secure hitches on the Western Union poles into town. 
The Overseers believe the 'phone to be a necessity, not only for. general 
use, but in case of fire, sickness or other urgent' need, and therefore re- 
commend that the same be installed this year. 

There has been an average of 9 inmates the past year, and the 
number is now 10, with pro?pe<-ts of increase shortly. 

After six years of faithful and painstaking service, for which 
they are entitled to our thanks, the superintendent and matron, Mr. 
and Mrs. J. H. Gidney, resigned on November 1st. Because of the in- 
crease in wages paid tarm help the Overseers did not expect to secure 
a competent man and wife for the same money they had been paying; 
but, contrary to expectations, they found a superintendent and matron 
in the persons of Mr. and Mrs Edgar I. Holland who were willing to 
assume the duties for the same compensation. They were installed No- 
vember 1 and are giving promise of satisfaction. 

The affairs of the Overseers Department have been managed in a 
most pleasant manner without friction. The work has been carried 



72 



IPSWICH TOWN REPOKT. 



along smoothly and we feel successfully. Our ideas may not always 
conform to those of every other citizen, but we believe that 
careful and thorough investigation will show that good judgment has 
prevailed to a satisfactory extent. 



Respectfully submitted, 



FRANK T. GOODHUE, 
JOHN G. SPERLING, 
CHARLES G. HULL, 



) Overseers 
Y of the 
) Poor. 



IPSWICH TOWN KEFORT. 73 



REPORT OF THE SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, 
Gentlemen: — 

I have the honor to present to you the report of the Sealer of 
Weights and Measures of the Town of Ipswich for the year ending De- 
cember 31, 1917. 

The importance of the subject of weights and measures is proba- 
bly attracting more attention today than at any time in history. The 
advanced cost of food products and fuel brings home to the consumer 
the fact that ounces and pounds are important factors. When you step 
into the grocers and ask for a pound of sugar you wonder if it really 
weighs 16 ounces, while a short year ago you bought 10 pounds not 
giving the ounces a thought. 
FRUITS AND VEGETABLES: 

All fruits and vegetables are now sold by dry measure weight. 
The old dry measure method has been superceeded by weights affixed 
by law. 
COAL: 

Coal can be sold only b? weight. While the consumers may order 
it by the bushel, barrel, or basket, the dealer must weigh each quantity 
he sells. 

BREAD: 

Heretofore the weight of a loaf of bread was 32 ounces and was 
sold as either J4, V^ or 34 loaves, hence the baker was not confined to 



74 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



any particular weight, as he could call his bread a }4, Y^ or 44 l° a ^ 
The law did not protect the consumer. Today under the ruling of the 
Food administration all bakers who use three or more barrels of flour a 
month must be licensed. The licensee shall manufacture bread and of- 
fer it for sale only in the following specified weights or multiples there- 
of, which shall be net weight, unwrapped, 12 hours after baking: — 

16 oz. units (not to run over 17 oz.) 
24 oz, units (not to run over 25^ oz.) 

Thus the baker is confined to these rulings as to over and under weight. 
WOOD: 

The present scarcity of coal has caused a great increase in the 
use of wocd as fuel. A number of bills are pending before the General 
Court, which are designed to regulate the sale of cord- wood, kindlings, 
etc. to secure uniformity in the measurements and sale of this fuel. 

1 wish again to urge upon the people of the community, and es- 
pecialh r the the farmers who buy and sell more or less produce, 
the importance of having in their homes scales which have been proper- 
ly tested and sealed. 

Respectfully, 

WILLIAM A. STONE, 

iSealer of Weights and Measures. 



Platform Scales over 5006 lbs. 

Platform Scales under 5000 lbs. 

Counter Scales' 

Beam Scales 

Spring Bal, Scales 

Computing Scales 

Slot weighing Scales 

Prescription 

Avoirdupois weights 

Apothecary 

Metric 

Troy 

Dry measures 

Liquid " 

Oil and gas pumps 

Molasses pumps 

Yard measures 

Cash received as fees 
treasurer. 



7 sealed 


1 condemned 


51 


< i 


2 


38 


<< 




13 


«« 


1 condemned 


40 


<< 


2 


24 


<< 




5 


«« 




4 


< « 


1 non-sealed 


396 


<< 


40 adjusted 


82 


<< 


4 condemned 


32 


<« 




. 8 


tt 




10 


tt 




133 


tt 


2 condemned 


18 


(• 


1 


2 


tt 




20 


a 




$70.68 and 


amount 


paid to town 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



75 



INVENTORY OF EQUIPMENT, DEPARTMENT OF WEIGHTS 

AND MEASURES. 



OFFICE STANDARDS. 

One large standard office balance. 
One set avoirdupois weight! containing : 
One 50 lb. 
25 
20 
5 
4 
2 
1 



One set apothecary test weights in mahogany box, 1-10 grain 
to 2 drams. 

One set metric test weights in mahogany box, 1 milligram to 
50 grams. 

One set iron standard liquid capacity measures, 4qt., 2 qt., 
1 qt,, 1 pt, 1-2 pt., 1-4 pt. 

One set iron standard dry capacity measures, 16 qt., 8 qt., 
4 qt., 2 qt., 1 qt. 

One standard brass yard measure. 



)ne 8 


oz. 


4 


< < 


" 2 


n 


1 


<» 


" 1-2 


<< 


" 1-4 


ft 


" 1-8 


<< 


" 1-16 


< 



SEALERS WORKING STANDARDS 

One portable test balance for testing avoirdupois weights- 
This balance has a capacity of 10 lbs. and a sensibility reciprocal of 
1 grain at full load. 

One pocket balance for testing metric and apothecary 
weight. The capacity of this balance is 60 grams and the sensibility 
reciprocal is one milligram (1-65 grain.) The sensibility reciprocal 
is defined as the amount of weight required to cause a deflection of 
the indicator one full scale division. 

One set apothecary weights, 1-10 grain to 2 drams. 

One set metric weights, 10 milligrams to 50 grams. 

One cylindrical glass graduate to deliver two fluid oncei. 



76 IPSWICH TOWN R1PORT. 



Twenty 50 lb. avoirdupois weights. 

One 25 1b. 

One 101b. 

One 5 1b. 

One set avoirdupois weights in mahogany cases 1-16 oz. to 



4 lbs. 



One set liquid measure*, 1-2 pt. to 1 gallon. 

One set dry measures. 1-2 pint to 1-2 bushel. 

One set liquid measure*, 1-2 pint to 5 gallons for testing 
gasoline and oil measuring pumps. 

One portable drill for adjusting weights. 

One sealing clamp for sealing liquid measures. 

One hand seal press. 

One sealers' anvil or stake. 

One square iron sealing block. 

One oak stand for testing large beam scales, will support 
1500 lbs. 

One metal spirit-level, 

Gumned paper seals, lead seals, aluminum seals, tamping 
punches, pliers, steel dies, and all the various tools used in this 
work. 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



i i 





TAX COLLECTORS REPORT. 






Collected Abated 


Uncollected 
Jan. 1918 


1911 Taxes $ 23 40 




1912 ' 


$ 15 15 76 09 




1913 ' 


1284 51 695 71 


$ 97 33 


1914 * 


3416 77 725 04 


965 33 


1915 ' 


7224 95 561 53 


3698 42 


1916 u 


15003 48 1525 73 


10294 27 


1917 ' 


97316 20 151 25 


21708 09 




$124261 06 $3758 75 


$36763 44 



W IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



PERPETUAL CARE-CEMETERY FUNDS. 





Amount 






Balance 


.Name of fund- 


Jan. 1917 


Income 


Expense 


Jan. 1918 


Cogswell 


$391 80 


$15 67 


S2 50 


8404 97 


Andrew? 


266 02 


10 64 


3 50 


273 16 


Giddings 


167 09 


6 68 


11 00 


16.2 77 


Potter 


131 14 


5 25 


11 


125 39 


Kinsman 


71 20 


2 85 


1 50 


12 55 


Samuel Blooo- 


64 40 


2 58 


1 50 


65 48 


Staniford 


118 62 


4 7-1 


1 50 


12! 86 


Trow 


405 15 


16 21 


3 00 


418 36 


Dawson 


147 61 


5 90 


2 CO 


151 51 


Birch 


53 48> 


2 14 


2 00 


53 62 


Aaron K4n smart 


56 97 


2 28 


2 00 


57 25 


Varrell 


361 07 


14 44 


2 00 


373 51 


Eben Kimball 


181 79 


7 27 


3 00 


186 06 


Willcomb 


78 78 


3 15 


2 00 


79 93 


Daniel Clarke 


131 96 


5 28 


2 00 


135 24 


Rogers and Johnson 


108 30 


4 33 


4 00 


108 63 


Harriet L Kimball 


142 61 


5 70 


3 00 


145 31 


George Kinsman 


142 53 


5 70 


2 00 


146 23 


Martha Lakemar 


68 33 


2 73 


1 00 


70 06 


(aid well 


119 77 


4 79 




124 56 


Pingree 


100 08 


4 00 


2 00 


102 08 


Young 


25 44 


1 02 


1 00 


25 46 


Coburn 


312 88 


12 52 


5 00 


320 40 


Mary Haskell 


55 64 


2 23 


2 00 


55 87 


Hovey 


132 10 


5 28 


4 50 


132 88 


Plouff 


57 67 


2 31 


1 50 


58 48 


Fariey 


143 10 


5 72 


2 00 


146 82 


John B Lam son 


68 42 


2 74 


1 00 


70 16 



IPSWICH TOWN 


REPORT. 




/ 9 




Amount 






Balance 


Name of Fund. 


Jan. 1917 


Income 


Expense 


Jan. 1918 


Joseph Spiller_ 


m 63 


2 31 


■2 0C 


57 94 


Locust Grove 


37 $9 


1 54 




39 43 


Mary E Peatfield 


113 78 


4 55 


2 00 


116 33 


Lucy F Splller 


61 96 


2 48 


2 00 


62 44 


Josiah and Lydsa H Lord 


142 18 


5 59 




147 87 


Eben Caldwell 


124 08 


4 96 


11 00 


118 04 


M E Barber 


58 36 


2 33 


1 50 


59 19 


Sarah E Durgin 


105 97 


4 24 


5 90 


104 31 


Joanna Kinsman 


122 14 


4 89 


2 50 


124 53 


•Charles W Giddings 


113 98 


4 56 




118 54 


John Allen Brown 


122 70 


4 91 


2 00 


125 61 


Millett and Kimbal! 


220 04 


5 80 


2 00 


226 84 


Samuel Blake 


130 24 


5 21 


3 00 


132 45 


William G Brown 


138 35 


5 53 


3 00 


140 88 


Catherine Clarke 


134 58 


5 38 


2 00 


137 96 


Charles Palmer 


110 87 


4 43 


2 00 


113 30 


Sally Roberts 


145 91 


5 84 


3 50 


148 25 


Eugene Spinney 


133 03 


5 32 


2 00 


136 35 


Mary M Fields 


64 62 


2 58 


1 00 


66 20 


Luther Lord 


124 93 


5 00 


2 00 


127 93 


Ezra Lord 


131 83 


5 27 


1 50 


135 60 


Lucy H Brown 


131 38 


5 26 


2 00 


134 64 


Patience C Bray 


116 70 


4 66 


3 00 


118 36 


Richard T Dodge 


131 06 


5 24 


2 00 


134 30 


Henry F Russell 


105 83 


4 23 


2 50 


107 56 


George Haskell 


314 14 


12 57 


3 00 


323 71 


Theodore C Howe 


128 66 


5 15 


2 00 


131 81 


Nathaniel Shatswell 


126 23 


h 05 


2 00 


129 28 


George H Gilmore 


64 70 


2 59 




67 29 


Wm A and Ida M Stackpol 


e 159 90 


6 40 


3 00 


163 30 


Hannah H Pearson 


62 02 


2 48 


1 50 


63 00 


Harry K Dodge 


126 59 


5 07 


2 00 


129 6Q 


Henry S Holmes 


109 36 


4 37 


1 50 


112 23 


Caroline E Hodgkins 


55 63 


2 23 


2 00 


55 86 



M IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 





Amount 






Balance 


Name of Fund. 


Jan. 1917 


Income 


Expense 


Jan, 1918 


Aaron F Brown 


65 99 


2 64 




68 63 


J Farley Kinsman 


118 32 


4 73 


2 00 


121 05 


Thomas Brown 


110 80 


4 43 


3 00 


112 23 


Wm P and A W Gouid 


125 39 


5 02 


2 00 


128 41 


Lucy C Coburn 


252 03 


10 08 




262 11 


Wm H Kiniman 


115 31 


4 61 


2 50 


117 42 


Caroline E Bomer 


111 57 


4 46 


2 00 


114 03 


Elizabeth A Bailey 


58 98 


2 36 


2 00 


59 34 


John Lane 


53 79 


2 15 


2 00 


53 94 


Hannah Parsons 


62 10 


2 48 


1 50 


63 08 


E and T F Cogswell 


112 72 


4 51 


17 23 


100 00 


Moses and Ezekel Peabody 117 15 


4 69 


12 00 


109 84 


Charles H Cutler 


121 99 


4 88 


2 00 


124 87 


Wm and Abagail Haskell 


54 49 


2 18 


2 00 


54 67 


Willis and Stacey 


120 80 


4 83 


3 00 


122 63 


George E Lord 


119 16 


4 77 


3 00 


120 93 


Nora Fraser 


55 55 


2 22 


2 00 


55 77 


Franklin G Morris 


120 83 


4 83 


2 00 


123 66 


Robert Stone 


52 34 


2 09 


2 00 


52 43 


Emerson Howe 


118 87 


4 75 


5 00 


118 62 


Caroline E Lord 


100 99 


4 04 


4 50 


100 53 


Robert Gilmore 


235 93 


9 44 


3 00 


242 37 


John D Cilley 


119 48 


4 78 


2 00 


122 26 


Jame3 Griffin 


116 91 


4 68 


2 00 


119 59 


Eunice Caldwell Cowles 


120 52 


4 82 




125 34 


Ward F Canney 


56 13 


2 25 


2 00 


56 38 


Josiah Dudley 


105 40 


4 22 


3 50 


106 12 


John C Kimball 


353 47 


14 14 


6 00 


361 61 


Jennett F Caldwell 


185 66 


7 43 




193 09 


Rebecca G Hayes 


52 68 


2 11 


2 00 


52 79 


John Galbraith 


104 68 


4 19 


3 50 


105 37 


Thomas Holland 


1L4 42 


4 48 


2 00 


116 90 


John Choate 


78 25 


3 13 


2 U0 


79 38 


Lucy Slade Lord 


120 21 


4 81 




125 02 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



81 





Amount 






Balance 


Name of Fund, 


Jan. 1917 


Income 


Expense ■ 


Jan. 1919 


Walter E Lord 


109 37 


4 37 


2 00 


111 74 


Lemuel Smith 


. 52 24 


2 09 


2 00 


52 33 


Samuel J Goodhue 


54 91 


2 20 


1 50 


55 61 


John A Johnson 


112 17 


4 49 


2 00 


114 66 


Charles H Noyes 


54 39 


2 18 


1 50 


55 07 


Edwin H Damon 


54 39 


2 18 


1 50 


55 07 


Benjamin Newman 


111 57 


4 46 


1 50 


114 53 


Nathaniel Archer Fund 


111 01 


4 44 


3 50 


111 95 


Abby J Purington 


111 52 


4 46 


2 00 


113 98 


Sarah A Seward 


110 22 


4 41 


2 00 


112 63 


Frances P Weeks 


54 83 


2 19 


1 50 


55 52 


George A Lord 


53 62 


2 14 


2 00 


53 76 


William Heard 


105 83 


4 23 


2 50 


107 56 


Martha E Hanson 


218 80 


8 75 


3 00 


224 55 


Charlotte M Kimball 


109 30 


4 37 




U3 67 


Mary J Patterson 


107 51 


4 30 


2 00 


109 81 


William L Rust 


51 06 


2 04 


2 00 


51 10 


E Maria Stone 


78 66 


3 15 


2 00 


79 81 


LSandEJB Jewett 


259 76 


10 39 


6 00 


264 15 


John Cook 


51 52 


2 06 


1 50 


52 08 


Jonathan L Choate 


156 12 


6 24 


3 00 


159 36 


Sarah E Twombly 


103 08 


4 12 


3 00 


104 20 


N S and Eben Kimball 


105 04 


4 20 


5 00 


104 24 


Gen. James W Appleton 


252 60 


10 10 


6 00 


256 70 


Etta L Wentworth 


51 52 


2 06 


2 00 


51 58 


Baker and Dixon 


41 60 


i m 




43 26 


Charles H Baker 


76 50 


3 06 


2 00 


77 56 


Jeremiah Brocklebank 


50 00 


2 00 


1 50 


50 50 


William H Russell 


50 00 


2 00 


1 50 


50 50 


Winthrop Low 


50 00 


2 00 


1 50 


50 50 


Edward Morrill 


50 00 


2 00 


1 50 


50 50 


Jerry Spiller 


100 00 


4 00 


3 00 


101 00 


Abbie M Fellows 


50 00 


2 00 


1 00 


51 00 


Nathaniel R Farley 


100 00 


,4 00 


2 00 


102 00 



82 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 





Amount 


* 




Balance 


Name of Fund. 


Jan. 1917 


Income 


Expense 


Jan. 1918 


Eunice and Elizabeth Farley 50 00 


2 00 


1 00 


51 00 


Mrs Chas S Willcomb 


100 00 


4 00 


2 00 


102 00 


Perkins and Chapman 


150 00 


6 00 


5 00 


151 00 


Clara B Dobson 


50 CO 


2 00 


1 50 


50 50 


Mrs. Chas D Weeks 


75 00 


3 00 




78 00 


Mary E Roberts 


100 00 


3 67 




103 67 


Everard H Martin 


100 00 


3 00 


3 00 


J 00 00 


John B Brown 


100 00 


3 00 




103 00 


James P Dodge 


50 00 


50 




50 50 


William Kimball 


75 00 


19 




75 19 


David F Dow- 


50 00 






50 00 




$16173 27 


$638 20 


$344 13 $16467 34 


Income undivided 








8 74 




$16476 08 






IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



83 



RECEIPTS. 

Amount of Fund, January, 1917 
New Funds during the year 
Income from Investments • 



$475 00 
637 50 


$15713 33 
1112 50 





$16825 83 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid care of lots 

Expense, interest on Liberty Bonds 



Balance January, 1918 



$344 13 
5 62 
$349 75 



$16476 08 






INVESTMENT ACCOUNT. 

Town of Ipswich, Electric Light' 4s 

" " " Water, 4s 
City of Fitchbury' School, 4s 
Water Front Improvement Loan, 4s 
Liberty Bonds 
Ipswich Savings Bank 
Cash on hand — not deposited 



INCOME ACCOUNT, 



$2000 00 


7500 00 


3000 00 


2100 00 


1500 00 


326 08 


50 00 



$16476 08 



Balance undivided January, 1917 
Town of Ipswich, Electric Light Loan 
" " " Water 


$ 80 00 

300 00 


$15 06 


City of Fitchburg, School Loan 
Water Front Improvement 
Ipswich Savings Bank 


120 00 
84 00 
43 66 




Liberty Bond 


9 84 


$637 50 







$6*2 56 



84 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

CREDIT. 

Cemetery Funds $638 20 

Expense, Interest on Liberty Bonds 5 62 

Income undivided, January 1918 8 74 



$H52 56 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 85 

ELIZABETH M. BROWN FUND. 

Town of Ipswich, in trust, the income to be used under the di- 
rection of the Selectmen, by the Agent of the Society for the Preven- 
tion of Cruelty to Animals. . 

Balance, January, 1917 $812 02 

Income 32 80 

$844 82 

Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank Jan, 1918 $844 82 



JOHN C. KIMBALL FUND, 

Town of Ipswich, Trustee, under the will of John C. Kimball , 
income to be used for the purchase of books for the Ipswich Public 
Library. 

Balance, January. 1917 $587 36 

Income 23 72 

$611 08 

Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank, Jan. 1918 $§11 08 



Sfi 




IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 






TREASURER'S 


DEPARTMENT 


■ 




RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 


\ 






RECEIPTS* 






Balance, January, 


1917 






$19589 7£ 


Taxes, 


, 1912 






$ 15 


15 


< » 


1913 






1284 51 


<•« 


1914 






3416 


77 


** 


J 915 






7224 


95 


* 


1916 






15003 


48 


v< 


1917 






97316 20 


Moth, 


1912 






6 


50 


t < 


3913 






9 


37 


i e 


lyu 






22 


00 


< i 


1915 






39 


59 


« 


1916 






104 


96 


i < 


1917 






1275 


05 


Street Sprinkling, 


1912 




1 


50 


i i 


• i 


1913 




20 


52 


Department Bills 






531 


98 


Commonwealth of 


Massachusetts, 


Poor %, 


1916 127 50 



Mothers' Aid, 1916 104 00 

State Aid 2250 20 

Estimated Revenue : 

Com of Mass., Corporation Tax $10418 93 

'• " " Income Tax 11891 33 

11 " " National Bank Tax 1296 48 

" " " Soldiers' Exemption 128 09 

Liquor Licenses 9000 00 

All other License fees 306 50 

( riminal Fines 1511 79 

County of Essex, dog licenses 372 90 

" " " Rent of Court Rooms 325 00 

Rent of Town Hall 108 00 

Ipswich Mills, Police Service 720 00 

Sealer Weight! and Measures, fees 70 68 

Highway Receipts 467 88 

Mass. Highway Commission 145 85 

Town Farm Sales 1597 21 

Com. of Mass., Poor<# 66 00 

" " " Mothers' Aid 344 67 

" " :' Tuition 173 00 

Town of Rowley, " 3050 50 

Public Safety Committee, Sale of Potatoes 346 53 

F R Appleton, sale of Appleton School 350 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



87 



Interest on Deposits 


421 68 


" " Taxes 


2446 12 


All other revenue receipts 


1375 28 




<D*±0C'O'± **£ 


Temporary Loans 


50000 00 


Trust Fund Income 


694 02 


F L Burke & Son, 


406 33 


Electric Light Dept, , Light, power, etc. 


23625 63 


" Note issue 


2000 00 


Water Dept., Rates, supplies, etc. 


19890 56 


Cemetery Trust Funds, Perpetual Care 


349 75 


C D Parker & Co., State Guard Equipment 




Loan 


4700 00 


Cemetery Trust Funds, New accounts 


475 00 


Brown School Fund, Transportation fy 


90 00 




$317919 94 




$337,509 72 


EXPENDITURES. 




Accountant's Warrants : 




Department Orders 


$159272 22 


Temporary Loans 


100000 00 


Interest on Temporary Loans 


2496 07 


" General Loans 


2285 50 


" Electric Light Loans 


2440 00 


" Water Loans 


8089 00 


Maturing Debt 


12000 00 


Wm J Riley, Treasurer Trust Funds 

«<<« << «< << c < 


694 02 


Perpetual Care 


475 00 


Com, of Mass,, Liquor License Refund 


2250 00 


State Tax 


12870 00 


National Bank Tax 


541 98 


County Tax 


9144 93 


State Highway Tax 


2210 00 


Auditing Tax 


177 11 


National Bank Tax, refund 


17 48 


Boston & Maine R R., refund 


2 39 


Miscellaneous accounts, to offset duplicate 




receipt entries 


1129 35 




^i^nos n^ 




«polOUc/0 UO 


Balance 


21414 67 




$337,509 72 



88 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



BALANCE SHEET. 


DR. 






Cash on hand 




$21414 67 


Wm J Riley, Collector, Tax 1913 


% 


97 33 


4< 1914 . 




965 38 


" 1915 




3698 42 


11 1916 




10294 27 


" 1917 




21708 09 


Moth, 1908-'09 




38 71 


" 1911 




2 26 


" 1912 




8 36 


" 1913 




54 95 


" 1914 




9 09 


" 1915 




36 90 


" 1916 




153 53 


" 1917 




204 55 


Street Sprinkling, 


19U 


03 


♦ < n 


1912 


10 09 


<< < « 


1913 


14 82 


Electric Light 




1750 58 


Water 




4671 71 


Department Bills 




1843 17 


Revenue, 1918 




2211 59 


Com. of Massachusets 




2055 91 


Ovealay, 1916 




309 44 

$50139 15 


Sinking Fund, Water Department 


$!(■■■■ 


Net Bonded Debt . 




210353 99 


Trust Funds 




O LOUOU VU 

17931 98 




$403,035 80 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 





BALANCE SHEET. 


CR, 




Overlay 1912 


$ 283 43 


1913 


100 19 


1914 


117 66 


1915 


489 87 


1917 


1348 75 


Insurance, Fire Loss 


2104 80 


Temporary Loans 


30000 00 


Electric Light Revenue 


1750 58 


Water Revenue 


4671 71 


Moth Suppression 


1632 74 


Central Street Macadam 


53 49 


Market Street 


2 36 


Essex Road 


2213 33 


Education 


215 61 


Shell Fish 


20 00 


State Guard Equipment 


4700 00 


Electric Light Department 


715 55 


Water Department 


629 27 




$01vMO O* 


Refunding Loan 


$7000 00 


Central Fire Station Loan 


10000 00 


Burley School Loan 


2000 00 


Electric Light Loan 


58950 00 


Water Loan 


200*00 00 


Winthrop School Loan 


21000 00 


Heating Plant Loan 


7000 00 


Water Front Improvement Loan 


2700 00 


State Guard Equipment Loan 


4700 00 




po ldODU UU 


Cemetery Funds 


$16476 08 


Kimball Library Fund 


611 08 


Brown Animal Fund 


844 82 




♦ ijy&i y© 




$382530 82 


Excess and Deficiency 


20504 98 




$403,035 80 



90 IPSWICH TOWK REPORT. 

AUDITOR'S STATEMENT. 

I certify that I have examined the accounts of the Treasurer 
and find them correct, and find the balance in the hands of Treas- 
urer to agree with the report submitted. 

I have approved vouchers for all bills paid and find them to 

agree with the warrants to the Treasurer. 

ARTHUR H. WALTON, Auditor. 



NOTES MATURING 1918. 

Central Fire Station Loan $1000 00 

Burley School Loan 1000 00 

Refunding Loan 700 00 

Winthrop School Loan 2000 00 

Heating Plant Loan 500 00 

Water Front Improvement Loan 300 00 

Electric Light Loan S450 00 

Water Loan 2150 00 



$11100 00 



INTEREST ON DEBT 1918. 

Central Fire Station Loan $ 440 00 

Burley School Loan 67 50 

Refunding Loan 280 00 

Winthrop School Loan 840 00 

Heating Plant Loan 280 00 

Water Front Improvement' Loan 108 00 

State Guard Equipment Loan 117 50 

Electric light Loan 2334 00 

Temporary Loans, (estimated) 4000 00 



$8 



IPSWICH TOWN RETORT. 



91 



BONDED DEBT. 




TITLE OF LOAN. 


AMOUNT. 


PAYABLE. 


Refunding" 


$ 7000 00 


Serially 1918-1927 


Central Fire Station 


10000 00 


" 1918-1927 


Barley School 


2000 00 


" 1918-1919 


Winthrop School 


21000 00 


" 1918-1935 


Heating Plant 


7000 00 


" 1918-1931 


Water Front Improvement 


2700 00 


" 1918-1926 


State Guard Equipment 


4700 00 


" 1919-1923 


Electric Light 


58950 00 


" 1918-1937 


Water Notes 


40200 00 


" 1918-1936 


Water Bonds 


130000 00 


1924 


Water Bonds 


30000 00 


1927 


Total Funded Debt 


$313550 00 




Sinking Fund, (Water Dept) 


103196 01 




NET BONDED DEBT 


$210,353 99 





TEMPORARY LOANS. 
First National Bank, Ipswich $20000 00 
Sinking Fund, Water Dept 10000 00 



TOTAL 



$10,000 00 



April 23, 1918 
Sept. 24, 1918 



92 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



List of Unpaid 1917 Bills. 



ELECTION AND REGISTRATION. 
H A Russell, meals $4 00 

$4 00 

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES, 



Wm A Stone, balance of salary 


$100 00 


$100 00 






LAW. 






James J Welch, services in Clarke case 


$175 00 


$175 00 






HIGHWAYS. 






Thomas H Ready, labor 


$ 44 60 




Chas G Spiller, one-half expense on sidewalk 


34 05 




Angus I Savory, supplies for buoys 


155 99 


$234 64 






SOLDIERS' RELIEF. 






Tougas & Tougas, groceries 


$ 6 00 




John A Brown, rent 


84 00 






— 


$90 00 


EDUCATION. 






Cogswell & Safford, insurance 


$36 80 




John F Wippich, clock repairs 


2 25 


$39 Oi 






PARKS. 






Angus I Savory, supplies 


$0,85 


$0.85 



PUBLIC SAFETY COMMITTEE. 
John W Goodhue, supplies $8 70 

Measures Co., 3 30 

$12 00 

TOTAL $655 54 



HWICH TOWN REPORT. 



REPORT OP THE SELECTMEN. 

In our report of last year we called attention to the increase 
^d cost of labor and materials. The past year has seen no improvement, 
Labor is not only higher but hard to find Material also costs more. 
As yet we have not been able to get a quotation on the price of oil> 
one of the necessary things if we are to keep our streets in good con* 
dition at anything like a reasonable cost. There are many things that 
could well be done to improve conditions about town, but we feel that 
this is not the time to advocate them Among the most necessary and 
desirable is the ownership of a gravel pit, some kind of a power shovel 
and a motor truck which could deliver the gravel where needed at a 
reasonable cost. The sidewalks in town are sadly in need ot atten- 
tion, and a systematic plan, whereby improvements eould be made and 
extended year after year would greatly improve the locks of the Town 
and add to the comfort and convenience of the citizens. We wish to 
thank the various departments under the control of the Selectmen for 
their hearty co-operation, and to congratulate them and the citizens on 



9* IPSWIGH TOWN REPORT. 

the results obtained under the circumstances. We particularly wish to 
call attention to the small amount of unpaid bills at the close of the- 
year, a great improvement over the past. Last year we reported that 
the survey of the Essex Road had been completed and work would com- 
mence in the early Spring. We thought so r but the plans and the land 
damage releases were not given us until the late Fall. A small begin- 
ning was made at Whittier's Corner, and only the early Winter weather 
prevented work on the Essex end which will be completed as soon as 
the weather and labor conditions will permit. While we feel that much 
ihould be done in the way of improvements we shall ask only for that 
which is imperative, feeling that every effort and every thought at the 
present time should be to aid our Government and our boys at the 
front. 

In conclusion we desire to express our thanks to the Town offic- 
ials and all others who have assisted us in any way during the past year 

FRANK W. KYES, ) Selectmen 

JOHN A. BROWN, of 

GEORGE E. HO DGKINS, ) Ipswich. 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. t>5 



Report of Superintendent of Streets 

Board of Selectmen, 
Gentlemen : — 

I herewith submit the annual report of the Street Department 
for the year ending Dec. 31, 1917, also an itemized list of the property 
in the Highway Department: — 

Team No. 1 worked 2104 hours @ $0.75 $1578 00 

Team No. 2 " 2080 " " " 1560 00 

Extra team " 257 %< ' " 192 75 

Single horse " 1084 " 4 * ' .20 1*2 222 22 



Total $3552 97 

Number of gallons of oil used in oiling streets, 12778 

Cost of same $862 25 

Number of square yards covered, 80330. 
Cost of unloading $ 59 22 

Cost of sanding, materials and labor 170 87 

$280 «9 

Cost of oil 862 25 



Total cost of oiling $1092 34 



ftf 



IPSWICH TOWN RETORT. 



INVENTORY.. 




5 horses 


$1500 00 


S pair double harness 


175 00 


2 pair street blankets 


25 00 


2 pair stablt blankets 


7 50 


2 pair storm blankets 


7 00 


3 two-horse carts 


375 0G 


2 two-horse sleds 


100 00 


1 two-horse street sweeper 


225 00 


2 road machines 


200 00 


3 road plows 


20 00 


12 gravel screens 


60 00 


2 two-horse shovels 


10 00 


1 stone drag 


5 00 


3 road drags 


40 00 


1 two-horse stone roller 


40 00 


i steam roller 


15C0 CO 


1 scarifier 


400 00 


2 watering carts 


375 00 


7 snow plows 


100 00 


1 one-horse wagon 


60 00 


1 oil wagon 


600 00 


1 tar kettle 


45 00 


1 Ford truck 


400 00 


1 Albany jack 


18 50 


1 differential hoist 


25 00 


Snow fences 


120 00 


All other tools, etc 


600 00 

!7fl°rt ftft 




+ tV£o \)\J 


Respectfully submitted, 




JOSEPH A. HUCKINS 


»l 


Superintei 


ident of Street*: 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



97 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT. 





BIRTHS. 






Whole number of births reported 155. 




Born in Ipswich 


149 


Fathers born 


in Ipswich 9 


" Boston 


2 




a 


Mass 20 


" Salem 


2 




*. 


U. S 14 


" Newbury port 


1 




.< 


Provinces 25 


" RowUy 


1 




n 
n 
tt 
tt 
n 
** 
»« 


England 1 
Ireland 4 
Austria, Russia 
and Poland 54 
Greece 20 
Italy 3 
Sweeden 1 
Unknown 4 



155 



155 



\}$ 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



VI others 



born in Ipswich 


20 


Mass 


18 


US 




Provinces 


28 


England 


1 


Ireland 


5 


A us. Rus. Poland 


54 


Greece 


20 


Italy 


2 


Germany 


1 


Sweeden 


1 



155 



Births by months 
January 
February 
March 
April 
May 
June 
July 
August 
September 
October 
November 
December 



22 

17 

13 

12 

7 

8 

13 

12 

16 

9 

15 

li 



155 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



99 






MARRIAGES. 






Whole number of marriages returned 






88 


Grooms born in Ipswich 9 


Brides 


born in Ipswich 


12 


Mass. 20 






Mass. 


19 


U. S. 7 






U.S. 


4 


Provinces 8 






Provinces 


7 


Aus. Rus. Poland 16 






Aus. Rus, Poland 


16 


Greece 23 






Greece 


23 


Italy 3 






England 


1 


Portugal 2 






Ireland 
Scotland 
Portugal 
Germany 


2 
1 
2 
1 


88 








8* 


Grooms residing in Ipswich 62 




Brides in Ipswich 


68 


Mass. 20 




t 


Mass. 


17 


U. S. 6 




i 


U.S. 


3 


88 








88 


Marriage by months. 










January 






11 




February 






9 




March 






4 




April 






4 




May 






9 




June 


• 




8 




July 






12 




August 






3 




September 






9 




October 






7 




November 






6 




December 






6 





88 



100 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



By whom married 






R. C. Clergymen 




29 


Greek 




23 


M. E. 




9 


Congl. 




7 


P. E. 




18 


Denomination not 


given 


17 


J. P. 




1 



88 





DEATHS. 






Whole number of deaths 93 Males 44 . Females 49: Total 93 


Place of birth, 


Ipswich 


45 




< * 


Mass 


19 




1 1 


US 


10 




" 


Provinces 


9 




t ( 


England 


3 






Russia 


1 




i i 


Greece 


6 

93 




athers born in Ipswich 


!2 Mothers born 


in Iptwich 


11 


Mass 


19 


Mass 


19 


US 


9 


US 


9 


Provinces 


19 


Provinces 


15 


England 


4 


England 


4 


Ireland 


3. 


Ireland 


3 


Scotland 


1 


Scotland 


1 


Rustia, Aus- 


i i 


Russia, Aus- 




tria, Poland 


14 


tria, Poland 


16 


Greece 


8 


Greece 


7 


* * 


< < 


Germany 


1 


Unknown , 


4 


Unknown 


7 



93 



93 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 101 



By months, January 12 February 8 

March 9 April £ 

May 6 June 6 

July 6 August 5 

Seplember 10 October • 

November 5 December 12 

93 

INNHOLDERS LICENSE, 
Whole number recorded 4 Liquor license to 2 Innholders 

Victuallers license 6 " " " 2 Victuallers 

Wholesale licenses 3 Wholesale " 1 " an Innholder 

The whole number of liquor licenses recorded are 7: 
2 Innholder's licenses 2 Victuallers licenses 

2 Wholesale licenses 1 Wholesale license to Innholder. 

DOG LICENSES: 
Dog Licenses, total 201 dogs. Kennel license 1, viz: — 176 male 

dogs. 25 female dogs. 1 Kennel license, 5 dogs, 

LICENSES. 
Auctioneers Licenses 2. 
Junk Dealers Licenses 6. 
Billiards and Pool Licenses 9. 
Bowling License 1, 
Undertaker's Licenses 3. 

HUNTER'S CERTIFICATES. 
Resident Hunters 196 

Unnaturalized Resident 1 



197 



I wish to call the attention of owners and keepers of dogs to 
the provisions of Section 2, Chapter 271, Acts of 1917, which provides 
that evtry dog licensed shall be controlled and restrained from killing, 
chasing or harrassing sheep, lambs, fowl or other domestic animals; to 
be so expressed in the license when issued. 



102 IPSWICH TOWN" REPORT. 



LIST OF TOWN PROPERTY. 



School Houses 

Public Building's 

Public Grounds 

Town Farm 

Cemeteries 

Heard Wharf 

Averoff Wharf 

Turkey Shore Pasture 

Woodland, Linebrook 

Woodland, Common Fields 

Thatch Bank, Great Flats 

Thatch Bank, Third Creek 

Two Gravel Pits, Washington Street 

Gravel Pit, Essex Road 

Fire Apparatus 

Highway Department 
In addition to the property enumerated above, there is the 
shore, beach and other property given to the Town by the Com- 
moners, value of which is not estimated. The valuation of Water 
Works and Electric Lighting Plant will be found in the Water and 
Light Report. 



$120,000 00 


40,000 00 


10,000 00 


30,000 00 


5,000 00 


100 00 


3,250 00 


1,000 00 


200 00 


75 00 


1.5C0 00 


300 00 


15,000 00 


7,028 00 



TOWN OF IPSWICH, 



TWENTY- FOURTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OK THE 



W A T E R 



AND 



MUNICIPAL LIGHTING 



COMMISSIONERS 

■i 




FOR THE YEAR 1917. 



IPSWICH, MASS.: 
GEO. A. SCHOFIELD & SON, PRINTERS. 



1918 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



OFFICERS OF 

WATER AND MUNICIPAL LIGHTING 

COMMISSION. 



COMMISSIONERS. 

.Geo. A. Schofield, Chairman, Term expires 1918 

Geo. H. W. Hayes, " " 1919 

William H, Rand, " " 1920 

CLERK. 

Geo. A. Schofield, Office, Room 5, Town House 

Office hours from 1 P. M to 5 P. M, every week day 

except Saturday, Telephone 92-R. 

TREASURER. 
William J. Riley, Office at Town House 

Manager Electric Light, Geo. A. Schofield 

Chief Engineer, Edmund A. Russell 

Line Superintendent, Electric Light, C. J, Dupray 

Foreman, Water Department, William P. Gould 

Office of Commissioners, Room 5, Town House 

Meetings held every Friday at 8 P. M, 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



CONSTRUCTION DEPARTMENT. 

PIPE LINE. 

1. LIST OF BILLS AND AMOUNTS PAID FOR THE YEAR 
ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1917. 



PAID TO 


FOR WHAT 


AMOUNT 


William P Gould 


labor 


$105 00 


Cashman Brothers 


1 1 


22 95 


Albert Willard 


.< 


15 78 


SefT ro Comeau 


• < 


2 50 


Boston Coupling Co 


supplies 


7 60 


Walworth Mf g Co 


< < 


97 97 


Lumsden & Van Stone 


< « 


5 44 


Chapman Valve Co 


hydrants 


331 86 


F E Wood 


express 


7 70 




$596 70 




STATION. 




Austin Lord 


labor and material 


$178 30 


PUMPS AND MACHINERY. 




Morton Vacuum Breaker Co breakers 


$185 00 




SERVICE PIPES. 




William P Gould 


labor 


$256 05 


Harry Rutherford 


<« 


17 71 


Horace Barker 


<• 


25 84 


William P Edgerly 


<< 


36 29 


James Rogers 


(< 


3 13 


Lawrence Peters 


«< 


3 75 


John Douglass 


«< 


13 75 


Albert Willard 


<< 


51 39 


Charles Rust 


<« 


24 2i 


Walworth Mfg Co 


pipe and fittings 


82 71 


William H Rand 


<« << 


51 11 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



PAID TO 



FOR WHAT 



Lumsden & Van Stone 


pipe anc 


Crane Co 


■a 


Ipswich Mills 


<< 


H Mueller Mfg Co 


« 


American Express Co 


express 


Peoples Express Co 


it 


Canney Lumber Co 


lumber 


National Meter Co 


meters 


Hersey Mfg Co 


*i 


Buffalo Meter Co 


<< 


F E VI ood 


teaming 


D A Grady 


teams 


William P Reilly 


oil 


Chadwick Boston Lead Co 


lead 



William P Gould 
William P Edgtrly 
John Douglass 
Thomas R. Lord 
Electric Light Dept. 
George Brocklebank 
W Q Kinsman 
William Ready 
Kingsley Ellsworth 
Fred Bodwell 
Joseph Robishaw 
Highway Dept. 
Robert Spencer 
Otis Mclntire 
John Cronin 
Frank Comeau 
Henry Lavoie 



MAINTENANCE, 
labor 



AMOUNT 


§23 14 


54 99 


1 25 


^3 10 


5 12 


1 05 


14 90 


260 41 


10 34 


15 60 


13 06 


19 00 


1 47 


76 26 


31085 63 


$738 33 


189 06 


98 


5 40 


25 60 


2 50 


9 60 


3 80 


10 55 


16 24 


6 87 


4 13 


2 59 


3 06 


1 26 


2 59 


10 09 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



PAID TO 



FOR WHAT 



AMOUNT 



A Gallant 


labor 


Patrick Donlon 


t« 


Hammatt Street Garage 


auto 


William P Reilly 


oil 


John W Goodhue 


supplies 


D A Grady 


teams 


F E Wood 


teaming 


Albert Russell Sons 


repairs 


National meter Co. 


<» 


G W Knowlton Rubber Co. 


supplies 


Johnson Washburn Co. 


< < 


G P Anderson 


<f 


Peoples Express Co. 


express 


Joseph A King 


repairs 


Garlock Packing Co. 


supplies 


Lunkenheimer Co. 


< < 


Peerless Rubber Co. 


<< 


A J Wilkinson Co. 


*t 


Wiley Soap Co. 


soap 


Waldo Bros. 


supplies 


L J Wood 


teaming 


Autin Lord 


repairs 


J A Beaulier 


«< 


Shawmut Chemical Co. 


supplies 


George E Marsh 


<< 


Hart Packing Co. 


«< 


Cotton & Woolen Mfg Co. 


insurance 


G A Schofield 


(* 


Mutual Boiler Ins. Co. 


<< 


Electric Light Dept. 


<< 


G H W Hayes 


bond 


N E T & T Co. 


telephone 


J H Lakeman 


postage 


Ipswich Chronicle 


printing 


W N Prescott 


supplies 



$10 09 

1 02 

1 00 

1 30 

44 63 

26 00 

3 62 

10 85 

1 27 

17 37 
10 89 
41 56 

25 

3 65 

21 76 

15 62 

8 25 

14 36 

43 75 

3 60 

7 44 

18 40 
166 04 

14 85 
5 75 
32 97 
50 00 
18 75 
40 00 
30 45 
40 00 
28 19 

87 04 

88 30 
1 00 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



PAID TO 


FOR WHAT 


AMOUNT 


C F Chapman & Son 


supplies 


$ 1 55 


Hobbs & Warren 


< « 


14 70 


Allen Bros 


a 


10 00 


Town of Ipswich 


< « 


2 00 


First National Bank 


deposit box 


5 00 


F Doane & Co 


books 


8 00 


Electric Light Dept 


pumping 


2500 00 


Geo A Schofield 


commissioner 


100 00 


G H W Hayes 


<< 


100 00 


Wm H Rand 


<« 


100 00 


Geo A Schofield 


clerk and manager 


400 00 


Annie Atherley 


bookkeeper 


351 00 



Total, 



$5534 91 



SINKING FUND. 
Sinking Fund Commission annual contribution 



$4549 00 



NOTE PAYMENT. 



Notes paid by treasurer 



$2150 00 



INTEREST. 
Interest paid various parties by treasurer 



$8089 00 



8 



WATEK COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



II. RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR THE YEAR 
ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1917. 



Receipts. 




Disbursements, 


Balance, Dec. 31, 1916, 


$ 957 26 


Maintenance, 


$5534 92 


Water Rates, 


18885 48 


Services, 


1085 63 


Services, 


181 84 


Pipe Line, 


596 70 


Appro. Note Payment, 


2150 00 


Sinking £ und, 


4549 00 


Miscellaneous receipts, 


199 50 


Interest, 


8089 00 


water 


623 74 


Note Payment, 


2150 00 






Station, 


178 30 






Pumps, 


185 00 






Total, 


$22368 55 




$22997 82 


Cash balance, 
Total, 


629 27 


Total, 


$22997 82 



III. BALANCE SHEET FOR YEAR ENDING DEC, 31, 1917. 


Bonds issued, $160000 00 


Engineering, $ 3350 00 


Notes, outstanding, 40200 00 


Land damages and 


Premiums on bonds, 10412 58 


rights of way, l 3o99 12 


M notes, 60 75 


Pumping station, 14425 24 


Appropriations, 33224 20 


Pumps and machinery, 198 '17 65 


Miscellaneous receipts, 16^ 43 


Storage basin, 27693 59 


Water rates, 251333 27 


Bull Brook supply, 1778 60 


Filter appropriation, 143 28 


Distributing reservoir, 17827 56 


Appro, notes payable, 9739 25 


Pipeline construction, 124750 68 




Service pipe " 21834 61 




Store house, 178 70 




Miscellaneous, 2834 20 


* 


Cost of construction, 237,909 95 




Interest on bonds, 149661 20 




Maintenance, 81688 99 




Material and supples, 1626 95 




Water rates due and 




unpaid, 4444 70 




Services due and unpaid, 227 01 




Sinking fund payment, 29090 69 




Cash balance, 629 27 


Total, $505278 76 


Total, $505278 76 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



9 



IV. SUMMARY OF COST OFCONSTRTCTION TO DEC. 31, 1917. 



Construction Account. 


Dec 31. 1916 Year 1917 


Dec, 31, 1917 


Eii nearin^ 


$ 3350 00 




$ 3350 00 


Laid damage &rig-hts of way 


3599 12 




3599 12 


PuoiDin? Station 


14246 94 


$178 30 


J44:'5 24 


Pamps&pum.ping' machinery 


19452 65 


185 00 


19637 65 


Storage Basin 


27693 59 


\ 


27693 59 


B ill Brook suoply 


1778 60 




1778 60 


Distributing Reservoir 


17827 56 




17827 56 


Pipe line construction 


124469 90 


280 78 


124750 68 


Service pipe construction 


21075 63 


758 98 


21834 61 


Store House 


178 70 




178 70 


Miscellaneous 


2834 20 




2834 20 




$236,606 89 


$1,403 06 


$•37,909 95 



V. 



SINKING FUND. 



Receipts. 



Investments. 



Appropriation 



From profits 



Interest 



1895, 


$1700 00 


1896, 


1759 50 


1897, 


1899 08 


1898, 


1965 55 


1899, 


2032 00 


1900, 


2138 65 


1901, 


2363 50 


1902, 


2446 22 


1903, 


253 i 84 


1904, 


2680 32 


1905, 


2890 91 


1906, 


2986 47 


1907, 


3084 00 


1908, 


3418 34 


1909, 


3656 61 


1910, 


3671 99 


1911, 


3784 73 


1912, 


3901 40 


1913, 


4022 17 


1914, 


4146 45 


1915, 


4276 52 


1916, 


4410 42 


1917, 


4549 00 




32880 34 







$103,196 01 



Ipswich Savings Bank, $ 120 42 
Ipswich Water Loan, 46700 00 
Ipswich Elec. Lt.notes, 23000 00 
Ipswich Town notes, 1S200 00 
111. Cent'l R. R., 3 l-2s, 3i»00 00 
First National Bank, 1675 59 
Liberty Loan Bonds, 12500 00 



$103,196 01 



10 , WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Water Commissioners : 

Gentlemen : Following is the report for the year ending 
December 31, 1917. 

MAIN PIPES. 

The number of feet of mains laid to date and sizes are as 
follows: 

14 inch, 1,505 

12 inch, 10.963 

10 inch, 8,830 

8 inch, 17,897 

6 inch, 81,746 

4 inch, 3,708 

2 inch, 9,920 

1 inch, 2,070 

Total, 136,659=25 miles, 4659 feet, 

STREET GATES, 
Total number now set is, 157 

HYDRANTS. 
They are in good working order, the total now set if as fol- 
lows: 

Town, 178 

Private, 15 

Total, 193 



WARER COMMISSIONERS* REPORT. 11 

SERVICE PIPES. 

Twelve services have been added this year. Total number 
services connected with the works to date, 1054, 

Following- is an account of the number of services added, also 
the number of feet of service pipe laid (by y«ars) since the works 
were put in: 





No. ser- 


Town 


Private 


Total 


Year 


vices added 


Ft. 


In. 


Ft. 


In. 


Ft. 


In, 


1894 


181 


4,470 


4 


2,771 


2 


7,241 


6 


1895 


218 


5,312 


3 


6,051 


5 


11,363 


8 


1896 


110 


2,391 


9 


2,6,6 


5 


5,008 


2 


1897 


32 


896 


6 


1,991 


6 


2,288 




1898 


42 


1,112 


7 


1,318 


3 


2,*430 


10 


1899 


34 


841 


2 


1,335 


10 


2,177 




1900 


30 


641 


2 


2,741 


4 


3,382 


6 


1901 


25 


517 


4 


1,209 


5 


1,726 


9 


1902 


25 


580 


1 


3,657 


2 


4,237 


3 


1903 


19 


800 


1 


1,589 


1 


2,389 


2 


1904 


17 


367 


5 


263 


2 


630 


7 


1905 


30 


1,172 


7 


443 


1 


1,615 


8 


1906 


22 


454 




233 


5 


687 


5 


19C7 


49 


986 


9 


625 


8 


1,612 


5 


1908 


38 


715 


3 


464 


8 


1,179 


11 


1909 


31 ' 


653 


5 


333 


9 


990 


2 


l-'lO 


35 


765 




819 




1,584 




1911 


15 


345 


5 


271 


11 


617 


4 


1912 


13 


328 


8 


\ 188 


10 


517 


6 


1913 


16 


526 




350 




876 




1914 


15 


262 


5 


146 


2 


408 


7 


1915 


25 


451 


9 


145 


10 


597 


7 


1916 


19 


374 


3 


254 


2 


628 


5 


1917 


12 


. 225 


5 


172 


5 


397 


10 



24 1054 24,482 7 2,9997 54,528 5 

Total, 54,528 feet, = 10 miles, 1778 feet. 
The service pipes are cast iron, lead and galvanized iron from 
3-4 inch to 4 inches. 



12 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



SYNOPSIS OF THE PUMPING RECORD FOR THE YEAR 
ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1917. 



1917 


Total pumping 
time per month 


Total nunber gallons 

of water pumped per 

month, 


Average num- 
ber gals, water 
pumped per 
day. 


Month. 


Hrs. | Min. 


Gallons. 


Gallons. 


January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August ' 

September 

October 

November 

December 


176 
174 
164 
180 
187 
194 
230 
263 
195 
200 
170 
196 

2333 


■60 
30 
30 
45 
15 
15 

45 
15 
45 
15 

45 


9,211,800 
8,944,800 

:8,331,600 
9,169,950 
9,367,050 
9,894,150 

11,919,600 

13,605,300 
9,911,250 

10,209,825 
8,901,975 

10,323,225 


297,154 
319,458 
268,761 
305,665 
302,163 
329,805 
384,503 
438,881 
330,375 
329,349 
296,733 
333,007 


Total for year 


119,793,525 




Daily average for year 








328,193 



Estimated amount of coal consumed during the year, 172 tons, 
1141 pounds. 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



13 



METERS. 

Three meters have been added this year, the total number 
now in use is as follows: 



NAME. 


Sizes. 


Total, 




3 in, 

4 


2 in 


1 l-2in 


1 in. 


3-4 in. 


5-8 in. 




Crown 


10 


4 


5 




47 


69 


Empire 








1 




55 


56 


Hersey 




1 




3 




30 


34 


Lambert 




2 




3 




28 


33 


Niagara 






1 




55 


13 


69 


Nash 








5 




281 


286 


Union 












1 


1 


Worthington 








2 




17 


19 


Columbia 












2 


2 


Elevator 






5 








2 




4 


13 


19 


55 


474 


571 



14 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



TREASURER'S STATEMENT. 



WATER DEPARTMENT, TOWN OF IPSWICH. 
WILLIAM J. RILEY. TREASURER. 

DR. 



To cash on hand, January, 1917, 


$ 957 26 


To amounts received: 




Fixture rates, 


7287 41 


Meter rates, 


11598 07 


Miscellaneous water, 


623 74 


Service pipe supplies, 


181 84 


Insurance dividend, 


45 00 


Hay at Station, 


20 00 


Note appropriation, 


2150 00 


Refund Electric Light. 


134 50 


CR. 
By paid: 




Commissioners* orders, 


$12129 55 


Notes, 


2150 00 


Interest, 


80,-9 00 




$22368 55 


Balance, January, 1918, 


629 27 



$22997 82 



$22997 82 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 15 

The Treasurer has the following bills for collection: 
Fixture rates, $1755 91 

Meter rates, 2385 39 

Little Neck, 297 40 

Treadwell's Island, 6 00 

Service pipe supplies, 227 01 

$4671 71 



16 



to 

Q 

Z 

o 

00 
Q 



CO 
UJ 

h- 

o 
z 

DC 
UJ 

I- 
< 



O 
CD 

Q 



cd 



O 

Q 
O 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



CO 

.2 

3 

-(-3 

eg 


cm 

05 

T— i 

>> 

3 


CM 

OS 

c 

OS 
•-a 












3 C 3 O^C cMoX t)M 
°^2^00 Q>00 <D0C CUo6 

oo oo to io »-<lo s-io *-< lo ^ 

'— < — CM CM cdCM C^Tt (tf cm OS 

©©os&e-cD&e-cDse-cD&e-cD 

i— 1 i-H — ^ t>, fc*. few 


CD 

S 


1-100 
101-130 
131-136 
137-138 
139-147 


LO LO LO 

1—1— 1—1 

00 Oi O ^ Cr- 00* 

-^ Tji IC uo uo lO 

1— 1 T— 1 1-H T— 1 1— | 1—1 


o 

CO 


OlOO 

i ■ i lo 

00 00 sC- -^ 


t- CO 

OC '-H CM 
CO rH • »-| 


3 


OO^KMOiHH^COHMHMOOlOH 
O CO i—l i—l 


1— 1 i-H »-< 



•^iflf>050COCO^I>r-t*OOOC0 01 Tj< LO CO 
OCiOiOiOOOOOOOOi— i— < — '1— < •— • i—i i— i 
00'JC0C00C5O*>O5^O5GriO5CiO5C5CiCS C5 Oi OS 



ti"* t> i-T ~r ^ i-H ° 

J^> a c ^?^* d d d .)_>' > d > 4-s" -i-j +i +j d d 
3 cS £s1"j13 cd d cd o o cd c o o o o a> cd 



c3 



"'sf 1 ^3^ "^ ^* ^^ ^sj 1 ^^ ^* *™t* ^* ^^ ^F "^J 1 ^J* "^ ^^ 



"«* 



tj< 



Tf< 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOo 
OOOOC^OOOOOOOCOOo 
c^o o o^o O O © O O O O LO O u: o 
© cT co~ oS © i-T i-T W co~ i-T cm" r-T co" tjT r - _," 

© CO . ^ 

fee- 



© 

iO 
CM 



© 
© 
CM 



^r © 



© 


<=> 


LO 


o 


t> 


CM 






"tf 


© 












OJ 




60- 



-l-> 4-> -+J 

.a .a . a 

O P Q 

CD $ <D. 

> .fe .^ 



5-i 
CD 

i_> 
O 
J-. 

OQ 



^3 






J3 



-1-3 

a 

CD 

•Q 



o £ 
. a 

0gHH 

'C c 

a .>.S g 



03 



^T3 ^' 
M CD »J 

a^o a 

. O ^ 

&* O 1 ^ 

3 he 

CD 3 

3 ££: 

3 eg 3 
•i- 1 >-y ••-• 



CO .^ 



bJC 
3 



CO OT 

bo co ^ 
3^^ 

C72&H § 

CD bo 



3 

CD 

O 



n 3 

CD •►-! 






MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 



17 



ELECTRIC LIGHT DEPARTMENT. 



CONSTRUCTION EXPENSES. 



PAID TO 


FOR WHAT 


AMOUNT 


The following bills 


have been paid for construction during 


the year 1917. 






C J Dupray 


labor 


|414 78 


Orrin Leno 


<< 


258 00 


J H Sheppa^d 


(i 


60 00 


J A King 


<< 


6 80 


C S Tyler 


supplies 


1 21 


C F Chapman 


tt 


5 35 


American Express Co 


express 


4 54 


D A Grady 


teams 


3 50 


Peoples Express Co 


express 


2 70 


A D Mallard 


< « 


4 36 


J W Goodhue 


supplies 


23 89 


Pettingell Andrews 


<• 


1914 09 


Frank Mallard 


labor 


5 00 


F E Wood 


express 


44 64 


General Elec Co 


supplies 


1243 16 


Geo H Lord 


labor 


1 25 


Edison Lamp Works 


supplies 


111 80 


Canney Lumber Co 


lumber 


25 


N E Tel & Tel Co 


labor and supplies 


301 39 


Wetmore & Savage 


supplies 


375 24 


Mayer & Porter 


labor 


130 71 



Total 



$4912 66 



18 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 



DR. 



CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT. 



CR. 



To balance 191K, $ 766 09 

To Depreciation appro. 2450 00 
To sale of note, 2000 00 

To cash, F R Appleton, 521 99 



$5,738 08 



By bills paid, 
By balance, 



$4912 66 
825 42 



$5,738 08 



COST OF CONSTRUCTION. 



PDec. 31,1916 Year 1916 



Cost of Real Estate 
Cost of Steam Plant 
Cost of Electric Lines 
Coat of Electric Plant 



$ 8117 19 




$ 8117 19 


16431 18; 




16431 18 


68463 41 


$4899 82 


73363 23 


9981 90 


12 84 


9994 74 


$102,993 68 


$4,912 66 


$107,906 34 



Tolal 



NOTES AND INTEREST. 



Interest paid 1917 by Treasurer, 
Notes " " " 



$2440 00 
3350 CO 



DR. 



NOTE INDEBTEDNESS. 



CR. 



To notes outstanding 

Jan. 1, 1917, 
To note authorized 

in 1917, 



$60300 oo 

2000 00 

$62,300 00 



By notes paid 1917, $ 3350 00 
By balance outstanding 
Jan. 1, 1918, 58950 00 



$62,300 00 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 



19 



MANAGER'S REPORT. 



To the Water and Municipal Lighting Commission. 
Gentlemen : 
I submit the following report of the receipts and expenses of 
the Lighting Plant for the year 19 1 7, 

MAINTENANCE. 



PAID TO 



FOR WHAT 



AMOUNT 



Edmund Russell 
J F Roberts 
Geo L Fall 
Geo E Brown 
F WFisk 
Wm P Edgerley 
E Olmstead 
R B Pickard 
Fred C Rust 
C J Dupray 
Orrin Leno 
J H Sheppard 



LABOR. 

Engineer 



jfireman 



Electrician 



$1248 00 

14 00 

1004 89 

1126 42 

1U46 50 

658 88 

898 87 

909 14 

8^8 90 

673 50 

414 00 

87 00 



Total 

Dexter Carpenter Co 
Atkinson Coal Co 
Lathrop Bros 
F L Burke & Son 
Ipswich Mills 



FUEL. 

coal 



$8980 10 

$4181 81 

1695 00 

243 98 

401 24 

245 18 



20 



MUNICIPAL LIGHTING REPORT. 



PAID TO 


FOR WHAT 


AMOUNT 


Boston & Maine R R Co 


freight 


$3696 96 


John A Brown 


use of track 


54 10 


Edmund Wile 


teaming coal 


356 76 


L J Wood 


< < 


208 88 


Rees Jenkins 


a 


140 96 


C L Henley 


<» 


52 05 


James H Sheppard 


«« 


24 75 


Town of Ipswich 


weighing coal 


4 30 


total 


$11305 97 


MISCELLANEOUS. 




G Adrian Barker 


insurance 


$683 72 


G A Schofield 


<< 


98 00 


Cotton & Woolen Ins Co 


<< 


100 00 


American Iron Works 


repairs steam plant 


30 05 


C S Tyler . 


»t 


3 88 


Ipswich Mills 


<« 


1 05 


Lumsden & Van Stone Co 


*( 


23 54 


American Express Co 


a 


' 1 72 


Lunkenheimer Co 


t< 


4 12 


D M Dillon 


tt 


32 95 


G W Knowlton Rubber Co 


<( 


9 62 


Boston Armature Co 


repairs electric plant 


18 20 


Ipswich Mills 


< < 


1 75 


Edgar Rand 


n 


2 50 


General Electric Co 


t* 


34 36 


G P Anderson & Co 


station supplies 


7 67 


Garlock Packing Co 


«< 


4 39 


G W Knowlton Rubber Co 


> « 


5 51 


C S Tyler 


n 


1 58 


C F Chapman & Son 


it 


10 75 


F E Wood 


a 


12 36 


J J Merrill 


a 


8 40 


J W Goodhue 


tt 


7 07 



MUNICIPAL LIGHTING REPORT, 



PAID TO 


FOR WHAT 


AMOUNT 


A G Gsborn 


oil and waste 


$633 05 


C F Chapman 


oil 


7 02 


N E Tel & Tel Co 


telephone 


•32 55 


Hobbs Warren 


books 


31 40 


J H Lakeman 


postage 


•87 04 


A M Clarke 


typewriting 


4 20 


Chronicle Pub Co 


printing 


33 50 


Measures Co 


supplies 


90 


Municipal Light Asso 


dues 


10 00 


G A Schofield 


cash paid 


39 74 


Pettingell Andrews 


lamps 


103 65 


Bert Goodhue 


labor on line 


10 69 


Frank Perkins 


a 


15 19 


D A Grady 


teams 


11 00 


Peoples Express 


express 


1 15 


American Express 


a 


1 74 


J A Huckins 


labor 


34 00 


E E Currier 


auto supplies and repair* 


34 91 


C C Caldwell 


tt it it a 


51 90 


R W Davis 


tt a tt tt 


64 56 


H Greenburg 


a ft t* ^ 


71 98 


C F Chapman & Son 


tt < < tt tt 


1 35 


Annie Alherley 


bookkeeper 


207 50 


G A Schofield 


Commissioner 


100 00 


G H W Hayes 


a 


100 00 


W H Rand 


tt 


100 00 


G A Schofield 


Manager and clerk 


400 00 


Total 


$3,342 21 



22 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 



DR. 



MAINTENANCE. 



CR. 



To bal. Jan. 1, 1917, 
To sale of current, 
To sale steam power, 
To Ins. dividend, 
To miscellaneous, 
To rent of poles, 
To amt. due for light, 



$ 8129 63 


19961 98 


2500 00 


yo 00 


36 90 


282 60 


L680 06 


$32,fi81 17 



By bills paid 1917, $23628 28 

Less old bills due 

Jan. 1, 1917, 
By bal. in favor of Dept. 



Jan. 1, 1918, 



2351 27 
6701 62 



$32,681 17 



JOBBING DEPARTMENT. 



PAID TO 


FOR WHAT 


Petttingeil, Andrews Co 


supplies i 


McKinney & Waterbuiy Co 


< < 


I J Dupray 


labor 


J H Sheppard 


a 



AMOUNT 



$97 94 
32 97 
14-00 
12 00 



Total 



$156 91 



DR. 



JOBBING DEPARTMENT 



CR. 



To bal, profits to 




Jan. 1, 1917, 


$3376 00 


To cash for labor and 




material, 


232 16 


To bills due, 


70 52 



$3,678 68 



By bills paid 1917, $ 156 91 

By old bills due 

Jan. 1, 1917, 236 28 

By bal. in favor of Dept. 

Jan. 1, 1918, 3285 49 

$3,678 68 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 28 



TREASURER'S STATEMENT. 

ELECTRIC LIGHT DEPARTMENT. TOWN OF IPSWICH, 

WM. J. RILEY, TREASURER. 

DR 
To cash on hand, January, 1^17 $1337 77 

To amounts received: 
Commercial light and power 
Tow a Buildings 
Jobbing, 
Power (steam) 
Insurance dividends 
Miscellaneous 
Rent of Poles 
Depreciation appropriation 
Note appropriation 
Interest appropriation 
Note issue 



CR, 

By paid: 
Commissioners' orders 
Notes 
Interest 

Balance, January, 19 18 

$35,203 40 

The Treasurer has the following bills for collection: 
Commercial light $1680 06 

Jobbing 70 52 

$1750 58 



$19206 16 




755 82 




232 16 




2500 00 




90 00 




558 89 




282 60 




2450 00 




3350 00 




2440 00 




2000 00 




$35,203 40 


$28697 85 




3350 00 




2440 00 






$34487 85 






715 55 



24 




MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 






CQ- 








05 










rt c3 ri >3 cj 3ti cs 






"£3 


COXHO.HiOO.'HCOlOt-^COO'* 0) 0) <U 05 05 Q> 0) 






*r* 


^0>3<>3t-iC\IC\IC\JCOCOCOCOCO<>1COCO Jr 






S3 

4*9 


050505050505050505 05 305053.050000000 






t— 1— <t— It- It- It— 1— iHrtr 1 H r- It-It— 1 r- 1 O O O O OOO 






ci 


oot-osooofN^ow^corlioo 4 xo'o'do* o' o'o 






9 


r— I jg MHOJOJ(MOOCO.-ONWH(MHOOOO OOO 




' 


O5O50505O50505050505O50505O505T— It— It— »i— It— it— 1— I 






r 


i-Ht— It— It— I^Ht— l-H— ^-Ht-4— (t— |r— it— !— 1 6& €/3- €/5" €/3" C/> C/5 €/3- 




GQ 


aiiaaitBaiiacoaiiQiiDKtfiojMto., .,.,,. „., ,. 






0) 


»o)a)a)^Q)aj(Da)(P(UH5ia)^«»(u»«g» 






+-> 


^4J-^^^-M^->^j-M^4^^-M4^-M^ififififif-tf 






o 


oooooooooooooooooooooo 






Szj 


flCCCCCCCCCSCCflflCCCflCGC 




■ 


d 


T— 1 




z 


o> 


C ! iC0C0C0'*'*iflC0l>0005OOOOCNtMC0r(<lO<0£> 




3 


OOOOOOOOOOOrHT-Hr- Mr- 1 — — 4t— IHr It— 1 




< 
o 


02 

GQ 


0505050^050505050505050505050505050505050505 




t— 1 


ioiolo «io ^ o'lq'o" o~05o"oocoo 




_J 


c 


^^^ tS r-3 t-H t_ t-; — • CO r-l CO _^^CO CnI CO CO CO CO CO CO 






0) 


„ . . • • .^ .0)010)05 . . . 05 05 0> 05 05 05 05 
^+»+»WWC>&OoflGC+J-T-»WCflCCeflfl 

^^£^^^^^3323000^3.33333 






+J 




1- 
I 


Q 




0> 


^P ^* "^* ^* ^* ^tf* "^^ ^J* ^f "^ ^F ^* "^f* ^sj* ^* ^j^ ^3* *^* "^^ "^^ ^3* ^* 




CD 

_i 








■4-i 


oooooooooooooooooooooo 


o 




C 


OOOOOOOOOOOOOOLOOOOOOOO 


lO 




3 


OOOOOOOOOOOOOiOC<jLO<X)D-t-00050 


05 


o 


o 


O^CNCOC>3(^^^CQ(>3(>lCgC<lCOCi'3^r'-tT-fT--lTHTHT-lC>l 


s 


EC 


<1 


. 


■• 








1- 










-tJ -U> -+J -4J jj ■+* -»-» 




o 




a a a a "£ a a 
050) o) o> 57 o> 05: :: :: :: 
. .Q .Q . .Qjg* .Q 2 .Q .Q 




UJ 






_l 

UJ 




05 $ 05 ^^ « F O 0) Q)« ^ . « 






>H 






W 


^V-g^To cS-S-S 5-*-g §-§,*■§ -g 






Q 


a Savings Ban 
n Savings Ban 
g Fund, Ipswi 
n Savings Ban 
g Fund, Ipswi 
:on Savings Ba 
3f Massachuse 
g Fund, Ipswi 
ery Trust Fun 
Avenue Savin 
n Savings Ban 
g Fund, Ipswi 
lent Savings B 
g Fund, Ipswi 
h Savings Ban 
g Fund, Ipswi 
e A, Schofield, 
g Fund, Ipswi 

it tt 
it tt 

tt t< 




j 




13 




W 


o 
Eh 
















0)05G0»Cm"G-Sj305C!UC.^GbfiG 

A-i u^j v-< k— H '-h |__| -*-> .^^ J*£ I—- ^H •—■ 1*^ 'r* CL-'-' JZ, '^H 

uScQTSMWajcziOr^lScn&Hai hW O w 























MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 25 



'S 



The following table shows the income receipts and the outgo pay- 
mints of the Department for the year ending December 31, 1917, as 
they apply to the method of ascertaining the cost of street lighting for 
the year. 

OUTGO. 

Maintenance bills paid $23628 28 

Interest on debt paid 2440 00 

Depreciation appropriation 2450 00 

$28518 28 



INCOME, 

Sale of light and power $21975 77 

Miscellaneous receipts 309 50 

Increase in Jobbing inventory 132 00 

$22417 27 

$6101 01 
This excess of expenditures over earnings represents the amount 
which by the State law is charged against street lighting and in- 
cludes as will be noticed both the interest amd depreciation appropria- 
tion. No direct appropriatitn is made for street lighting. This balance 



26 MUNICIPAL LIGHTING REPORT. 

divided among the street lights give the following cost of each street 
light for the year 1917: 

790 lamps each burning 40 watts, one year $ 6 72 each 

19 " " " 250 " " " 41 73 " 

It will be seen that the cost of street lighting in Ipswich is ascertain- 
ed by the state method of charging the appropriations for interest and 
depreciation to the street lights and adding to those figures the ex- 
cess of cost of manufacture over the income received from private cus- 
tomers. In ordinary years there has been no such excess to charge. In- 
deed, instead of an excess of expense there has been a surplus for credit. 
The coal situation in 1917 has been such that the expense has increas- 
ed. Practically the same amount of coal was used in 1015, 1910 and 
1917 and yet the cost of coal for the three years was as follows: 1915, 
$6370., 1916, $7917., 1917, $11305. In two years time the cost of coal 
increased $5000. In spite of this fact the price of electricity in Ipswich 
has been reduced this year from 10 cents to 9 cents per K. W. hour, 
while in most of the surrounding private plants the price has been in- 
creased. 

The following table shows the increase in the number of services 
and also the amount of sales each year since the start: 

Sale of Current 

Year No. Services and Power 

1904 69 $ 3605 53 

1905 105 7076 77 

1906 131 8330 68 

1907 170 7462 43 

1908 195 9010 34 

1909 218 9178 64 

1910 269 10594 48 

1911 323 12159 42 

1912 362 14557 45 

1913 435 16131 80 

1914 477 173b0 33 

1915 521 19559 41 

1916 591 19497 04 
19L7 652 21975 77 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 27 

I desire to point out that under a system of bookkeeping which 
would give full credit to the electric lighting department, in other 
words treating H the same way you would treat a private company if 
the town was purchasing electricity, and giving credit at the same 
prices, that the electric light department would make even a better 
showing than it does under the system of state bookkeeping. A num- 
ber cf municipal lighting plants have recently had their books put on 
such a business ba is, notably Reading, Marblehead and Holyoke, with 
the result that it has been clearly shown that municipal lighting in 
those places is e\en more successful than its warmest advocates had 
realized. I believe that the new system ol bookkeeping should be 
established in Ipswich and I recommend that attion be taken to that 
end, and that changes be made to give proper credit for the past 
fifteen years. I desire also to call attention to the fact that the 
amount paid by the water department for pumping water has been 
very much less than it should be. While the town owns both plants, 
an I as a town neither gains or loses by this fact, nevertheless it is 
business to give each department full credit for what it accomplishes 
especially when the tow 7 n comes to the question of purchasing electric- 
ity or continuing to manufacture its own current. 



In connection with the question of purchasing electric current, it is 
not my wish to influence the voters one way or the other by any ap- 
peal to sentimental reasons. I do feel justified, however, as one who 
took an active part in establishing a municipal lighting plant in Ips- 
wich, and as manager of the plant for the fifteen years of its existence, 
to caution the voters to remember that we have done wonderfully well 
with our own plant; that the future looks even brighter than the past 
and that under no circumstance should the town of Ipswich ever give 
up its municipal lighting plant. It is right you should be jealous of 
every move which will appear to endanger that control and that you 
should be shown that your rights are safeguarded before you assent to 
any change. 



28 MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 



Owing to the fact that my health has not been all that it should 
be, and to the further fact that my other business interests will not per- 
mit me to give the necessary amount of time to the management of 
this department that should be given to it, I have, with deep regret, 
decided to resign my position as manager and also to give up my posi- 
tion as a member of the Commission. 

Twent3^-five years ago the people of Ipswich first honored me with 
election to town office and from that date down to the present, year 
after year, Ipswich voters regardless of party lines have given me loyal 
support for town,, state and national office. You do not need to be told 
that I appreciate your loj^alty You must feel and know that it has 
been the feeling that I owed you something in return which has caus- 
ed me tor a quarter of a century to do my best as a public official for 
my native town Other men have gone out and accumulated wealth, 
but I say to you honestly and sincerely 1hat I would not exchange the 
associations of the past and your loyal support and friendship even for 
that wealth. As a private citizen it is my deeire and intention to con- 
tinue to take a deep interest in all town affairs and especially in this 
department and tc assist in any way possible to hely my ''home town" 
I extend my sincere thanks to my associates on the Commission, and to 
the employees of the department for their kindness and assistance for so 
many years, and assure them that if I am able to be of any assistance 
to them in the future, that it will be gladly given, 

GEORGE A. SCHOFIELD, Manager. 
Ipswich, January, 1918. 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT TCEPOKT. 25 



COMMISSIONERS' REPORT 



To the Citizens of Ipswich, 
Gentlemen: — 

The Water and Municipal Lighting Commiss'oners submit theii 
annual report for the year ending December 31, 1917. 

Water department. 

On pages four to sixteen inclusive will be found a detailed account 
of the receipte and expenditures of the department for the year 1917. 

No extension of the main pipe has been made this year. It was 
our intention to complete the Kimball avenue extension to High street 
but owing to the high cost of all material and as there was not a press- 
ing demand for the extension the work was put over* 



30 MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 

The expenditures for the year 19-18 are estimated to be as follows' 

For Interest Payment $8003 00 

For Sinking Fund 4692 43 

For General Expense 5500 00 



Total $18,195 4& 

We believe that the receipts of the department will be lar^e 
enough to pay these expenditures without any appropriation being 
made by the town and we do not ask for any appropriation for these 
purposes. This estimate is made on the assumption that the present- 
relations between the water and electric departments will be continued. 
If there should be a change it is possible that a larger sum than 
estimated lor General Expenses would be required for the Water LepU 
That, however, it is a^question to be settled if a change is decided upon. 

Your attention is called to the fact that this department has con- 
tributed !>29i'9Q 69 from money earned during the past seven years to 
the Sinking Fund and has relieved the taxpayers from taxation to the 
extent of that amount, besides giving free hydrant service to the town. 
We also are pleased to direct your attention to the Sinking Fund Re- 
port on page 9. W T e now have $103,196.01 safely invested. 



ELECTRIC LIGHT DEPARTMENT. 

Pages seventeen to twenty eight of this report give in detail the 
account of the receipts and disbursements of this department as sub- 
mitted by the Manager. W 7 e are pleased to again be able to point with 
pride to the showing made b}' this" department. 

In spite of the war prices on all classes of material as well as on 
r oal, we have reduced our price to the consumers while other electric 
plants have increased their price, and in spite of a decreased price we 
have made a large incrtase in the amount received for sale of light and 
powe*. 



MUNICIPAL LIGHTING REPORT. 31 

Last year, we directed your attention to the matter of the pro- 
position of allowing the Newburyport Gas and Electric Company to 
supply electricity to the Ipswich Mills for power, and also tc. the sug- 
gestion of the Newburyport Co that it would sell electric current to the 
Town Plant. In our report of last year we said : 

"While we feel that it is our duty to earefully consider 
this or any other proposition which might possibly be of 
advantage to the Town, we do not feel that a hasty decision 
should be made; It is a question which should be carefully 
studied from every possible angle. We have had thirteen 
years of extraordinary success under the present plan, and we 
are today in a better condition to continue the work than at 
any time during those thirteen years We have gradually 
grown, adding man after man to our station, as the business 
warranted it, until today we have reached the limit and our 
expense account so far as station labor is concerned, is now 
practically fixed. New business in the future means increased 
profits. We have a well established system, adapted to the 
needs of our people, and a substantial annual income, and we 
should hesitate before taking any step which will change these 
conditions, i nless it is clearly and positively shown that such 
change will not only be to the advantage of the people, but 
that such advantage shall be permanent. 

Your commissioners are giving this question careful con- 
sideration, and, if definate plans and prices are presented to us 
we will lay the whole matter before the voters at a Town meet- 
ing for their consideration and decision/' 

Recently, as you know, the matter has come before the Town 
Meeting and a committee of seven, has been appointed to make an in- 
vestigation and to report at the annual town meeting. The members 
of the committee are George A. Schofleld, Geo. H. W. Hayes, William 
H. Rand, Charles M. Kelley, Frank W, Kyes, Thomas R. Lord and 
John W. Nourse. A competent engineer has been engaged, and the 
cost of generating electricity at our station, as w r ell as other factors im- 
portant to help form a decision on the question, will be fully investi- 
gated and a report made to the. citizens at one of the March meetings. 
Until such investigation and report are made, we have nothing to add to 
our statement of last year. 



32 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 



The following appropriations are needed for this department for 
the year 1918.- Depreciation $2450. Interest $2374. Note Payment 
$3450. 

We extend our thanks to the voters and to the employees of the- 
departments for their|kindness and cooperation in helping make our" 
work successful, and we hope that our conduct of these two important 
departments have merited approval. 



Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE A. SCHOFIELD- 
GEORGE H. W. HAYES, 
WILLIAM H. RAND r 



Ipswich, January, 1918. 



Water and 
Municipal light 
Commissioners.. 



S S 

1 have examined the books and accounts of the Water and Electric 
Light Department, and of the Treasurer of the Sinking Fund and fine! 
them correct. 

ARTHUR H. WALTON, Auditor, 
Ipswich, February 19, 1918. 



t£oimt of Jpsitofcf). 



ANNUAL REPORT 



... OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




FOR THE YEAR 1917. 



CHARLES G. HULL, PRINTER. 

8 COGSWELL STREET, IPSWICH, MASS. 

1918. 



: ^^ai iitiiiiiftiitHjiiiiiiiuiiiiaiiiiifiiiriifi!it:nHJSij>iHifiiiii!tiifi«#tfii^rift{tiiiiui'tfi!ii«fifiiiitiiitiutiiiiiii \u /y> 
| ORGANIZATION OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. f 
' = %niiiiiiiitHHiiiiiitfitiiHffi&tiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinirHiiiifiiiiniitfiifiitfiiirffiti]fnfiifiiiiiiiiifiiiiiiifiifnirfiiiiiisi^ r 



Chairman Herbert W. Mason 

Secretary and Purchasing Agent 

Howard N. Doughty 

Finance and Budget 

Herbert W. Mason and William J. Riley 

Text Books and Teachers 

Herbert W. Mason and Dr. G. E. MacArthur 

Buildings and Grounds 

Luther Wait and Joseph W. Ress 

Improvements and Insurance 

Luther Wait and Joseph W. Ross 



School Physician Dr. George E. MacArthur 

School Nurse Martha J. Stewart 



Attendance Officer George W, Tozer 

Clerk of the Board (from October 1 ) 

George W. Tozer 



Superintendent and Purchasing Agent 

Joseph I. Llorton 

Office Manning School Building 

Office Hours School Days from 3:30 to 5:00 



EDUCATION. 



General Expenses, 

Joseph I. Horton, superintendent $1970 00 

George W. Tozer, clerk 4 1 8 00 

George W. Tozer, truant officer 50 00 

Charles G. Hull, printing report 2 1 8 00 

Wright & Potter, printing 1 50 

Hobbs & Warren, blanks 7 78 

Bernard L. Goss, printing 10 25 

Ipswich Chronicle, printing 58 70 

Measures Co., supplies 4 20 

J. H.Lakeman, Postmaster, postage 48 80 

Joseph I. Horton, cash paid out 18 28 

Henry S. Bowen, printing 1 50 

New England T. & T. Co., telephone 95 98 

Joseph I. Horton, postage 5 04 

Justin E. Hull, use of boat 1 00 

D. A. Grady, use of team 12 00 

J, P. Marston, cash paid out 4 00 

George E. MacArthur, M. D., physician 250 00 

Hobbs & Warren, blanks 26 

American Express Co., express 7 32 

F. W. Barry, Beale & Co., supplies 17 15 

A. D. Mallard, trucking 7 02 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



F. E. Wood, trucking 

W. N. Prescott, supplies 

H. A. Russell, meals 

Ye Rogers Manse, meals 

Peoples Express Co., express 

Frank S. Bentz Co., supplies 

H. B. McArdle, supplies 

B. J. Conley, supplies 

The Globe Wernicke Co., supplies 

Boston Index Card Co., supplies 

T. H. Perkins, trucking 

M. Bennett, supplies 

A. C. Damon, supplies 

Diamond Stamp Works, stamps 

Edw. iMiller & Co., supplies 

Brown-Howland Co., supplies 

Dennison Mfg. Co., supplies 

Estate J. A. Blake, supplies 



8 


97 


26 


66 


3 


00 


3 


75 




55 


79 


71 


8 


71 




25 


6 


13 


il 


90 


1 


25 


3 


43 


27 


87 


2 


75 


4 


77 


59 


00 




66 


1 


80 




$3557 94 



Teacher's Salaries. 

John P. Marston $1260 00 

Herbert W. Pickup 920 00 

William Murphy 660 00 

Amy B. Lindsey 945 00 

Mildred Emerspn 890 00 

iwendolyn Taggart 739 00 

lharles A. Goodwin 600 09 

ladys MacLay 420 00 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Adele Mathey 360 00 

Mary Preble 300 00 

Louise M. Marsh 260 00 

Mary W. Sullivan 240 00 

Elizabeth Ferguson 240 00 

Mary Weeks 240 00 

Olive Sullivan 200 00 

Winfield W. Lunt 1200 00 

Arthur H. Tozer 500 00 

Elizabeth E. Nutter 600 00 

Ralph W. Westcott 780 00 

Dorothy Westcott 1 5 00 

Katherine F. Sullivan 795 00 

Nellie T. Sullivan 640 00 

S. Isabel Arthur 775 00 

Eva A. Willcomb 5 70 00 

Annie P. Wade 559 00 

Lucy Ardel Kimball 595 00 

Carrie Bowman 5 70 00 

Grace Moulton 300 00 
Leroy W. Jackman * 240 00 

L. Eva Stearns 240 00 

Emma Bell 200 00 

Helen M. Anderson 220 00 

Lilian M. Mackinnon 129 25 

Hazel M. Weare 555 00 

Alice K. Dinneen 300 00 

Martina E. O'Neil 530 00 

Winifred M. Fleming 502 50 

Elizabeth Stolba 357 00 

Cora H. Jewett 3 1 2 00 

Bertha M. Bryant 145 00 

Marian P. Webster 206 25 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Elizabeth A. Caldwell 
Hilda M. Schofield 
Lydia S. Harris 
Alice Maguire 
Kathleen Broderick 
Franklin B. Mitchell 
Augusta N. Appleton 
Elsie C. Green 
Grace Higgins 
E'.thel Archer 
Marguerite Houlihan 
Esther L. Tenney 
Helen W. Durgsn 
Ethel Schein 
Blanche Richardson 
Alice Lockwood 
Augusta Greenache 
Pauline Claxton 
Hattie Brown 
Amy Ferguson 
L. Alice Lord 



200 


00 


247 


50 


530 


00 


no 


00 


330 


00 


5 70 


00 


319 


00 


330 


00 


535 


00 


430 


13 


332 


50 


10 


87 


22 


50 


22 


50 


10 


00 


27 


00 


67 


50 


22 


50 


48 


75 


3 


00 


10 


00 




$24288 75 



Text Books and Supplies. 

AHyn & Bacon $56 66 

Silver, Burdett & Co. 18 87 

Neostyle Co. 9 72 

Benj. H. Sanborn & Co. 46 38 

Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 4 16 

Ginn & Co. I 72 28 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT 



R. W. Westcott 
Zaner & Bloser CoT 
Gregg Pub. Co. 
D. C Heath & Co. 
Oliver Ditson Co. 
The Macmillan Co. 
American Book Co. 
1 hompson, Brown & Co. 
Chas. Scribners Sons 
Wm. H. Baldwin, Treas. 
New England News Co. 
Rand, McNally & Co. 
National Education Asso. 
Williams Bookstores Co. 
Little, Brown & Co. 
Mass. Bible Asso. 
Edward E. Babb & Co. 
J. L. Hammett Co. 
Ipswich Mills 
Milton, Bradley Co. 
C. Howard Hunt Co. 
A. J. Wilkinson & Co. 
Dowling School Supply Co. \ 
Neostyle Sales Agency 
Wadsworth, Howland & Co. 
The Prang Co. 
Chandler & Barber Co. 
John W. Goodhue 
Canney Lumber Co. 
J. F. Pope & Son 
Wm. H. Field Co. 
A. I. Saoory 
Electric Light Dept. 



1 


45 


20 


70 


30 


98 


54 


34 


17 


79 


52 


73 


418 


27 


24 


90 


33 


53 


2 


22 


12 


00 


8 


56 


12 


00 


3 


75 


137 


92 


7 


44 


598 


68 


514 


03 


51 


93 


29 


19 


17 


25 


55 


38 


8 


20 


17 


85 


8 


37 


2 


35 


7 


67 


20 


19 


270 


42 


18 


14 


12 


24 


8 


20 


4 


00 



IPSWICH SCHOOL RERORT. 



George H. Lord 

Boston Paper Board Co. 

J. W. Bailey & Sons Co. 

C. S. Tyler 
N. J. Bolles 
Hiller & Co. 
Farley, Harvey & Co. 
Measures Co. 
Titcomb & Co. 

D. J. Marlin 
Central Scientific Co. 
Electro Importing Co. 
Wm. G. Horton 
Peoples Express Co. 
American Express Co. 
B. J. Conley 
F. E. Wood 

Kenney Bros. & Wolkins 
Royal Typewriter Co. 
Underwood Typewriter Co. 12 00 

Blackbird 'Pen Co. 1 50 

H. B. McArdle 47 02 



11 


60 


18 


46 


2 


70 




38 


52 


72 


29 


10 


38 


68 


14 


72 




47 


3 


00 


58 


76 


4 


90 


1 


00 




95 


4 


31 


1 


35 


2 


00 


23 


88 


15 


17 



$3135 4 



Transportation. 

D. A. Grady $1 122 00 

W. K. Chapman 250 00 

Bay State St. Ry. Co. 450 00 



$1822 00 



10 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Janitor Service, 



Wm. H. Goditt 
George W. Tozer 
Horace E. Barker 
I. E. B. Perkins 
Smith E. Hayes 
George Haskell 
Wm. F. Rutherford 
Mrs. M. Ryan 
Cora H. Jewett 
Thomas A. Howe 
Fred B. Saunders 



$390 00 


271 


96 


153 


81 


60 


00 


50 


00 


75 


00 


60 


00 


48 


00 


18 


00 


348 


00 


306 


00 




$1781 37 



Fuel and Light. 



Charles L. Lovell 
Lathrop Bros. 
George Fall 
A. H. Peatfield 
D. Sidney Perley 
James R. Small 
Electric Light Dept. 



467 


32 




087 


03 




916 


97 




400 


93 




58 


00 




2 


50 




135 


94 






$4068 


69 



Buildings and Grounds. 

Wm, H. Gdditt, carpentry $312 00 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



George H. Brocklebank, masonry 4 00 

Manzer & Damon, carpentry 122 88 

Arthur H. Walton, painting 18 17 

George W. Hills, painting 5 7 84 

Reuben Andrews, painting 2 50 

Joseph A. King, repairs 6 90 

J.J. Merrill, services 259 45 

Austin L. Lord, masonry 71 84 

Leander Goditt, carpentry 28 75 

George H. Lord, carpentry 2 00 

George Hayes, plumbing 98 5 7 

R. L. Purinton, plumbing 23 42 

A.J. Brennan, plumbing 22 01 

Canney Lumber Co., lumber 111 30 

Ipswich Mills, supplies 6 53 

Edward E. Babb &Co., supplies 3 50 

Reformatory for Women, supplies 25 85 

Dustbane Mig. Co., supplies 23 25 

C. E. Chapman & Son, supplies 10 95 

Cleghorn Co., services and supplies 428 05 

Geo. B. Robbins Disinfectant Co., supplies 6 50 
Middlesex County House of Correction, supplies 9 07 

Walter F. Pools, supplies 75 

Lewis E. Willcomb, supplies 2 74 

A. G. Lauer, labor 1 00 

C. S. Tyler, supplies 1 05 

Wm. P. Reilley, supplies 4 23 

Water Dept., water 401 08 

George Haskell, fumigation 1 5 00 

Edmund Scahill, fumigation 62 50 

Rees Jenkins, teaming 124 14 

Ernest E. Currier, supplies 60 

John W. Goodhue, supplies 459 02 



12 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Wm. F. Rutherford, labor 

H. W. Phillips, supplies 

Wm. A. Mitchell, cleaning vaults 

Wm. G. Horton, supplies 

Edmund Wile, teaming 

J. A. Farley Co., supplies 

A. I. Savory, supplies 

Frank R. Schaller, tuning pianos 

Amos Banks, labor 

Standard Electric Time Co., supplies 

T. H. Perkins, trucking 

Monash-Younker Co., supplies 

Samuel C. Gordon, teaming and services 

F. E. Wood, trucking 

W. E. Hadlock & Co., repairs 

Fire Dept, supplies 

Katherine & Nellie Sullivan, supervision of 

school gardens 
W. N. Prescott, supplies 



1 


00 


58 


12 


57 


50 


42 


60 


20 


00 


7 


75 


5 


53 


16 


00 


1 


00 


5 


63 


13 


01 


1 


58 


169 


95 


3 


25 


17 


00 


4 


43 


201 


00 


12 


44 



$3365 23 



Furniture and Furnishings. 

John F. Wippich, repairs $ 75 

Kenney Bros. & Wolkins, supplies 14 05 

A. C. Damon, supplies 2 65 

Daniel Reid, supplies 30 63 

Clarence Cheever, repairs 12 50 



$60 58 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



13 



Rent. 



Nettie R, Johnson 



$15 00 



$15 00 



Diplomas and Graduating Exercises. 



Nason's Orchestra, music 

Ipswich Chronicle, printing 

C. F. Chapman & Son, supplies 

C. S. Tyler, ribbon 

F. W. Martin Co., diplomas 



Insurance. 



Damon & Damon 
G. A. Barker 



$17 00 


54 


61 


5 


50 


7 


77 


56 


10 



$140 98 



$221 10 
80 40 



$301 50 



Other Expenses. 

m. M. Murphy, supplies $ 5 00 

'oburn Charitable Asso., services Welfare Nurse 93 75 



$98 75 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



To the Citizens of the Town of Ipswich: — 

The School Committee desires to record its approval of the 
two-session plan for the High School, and has recommended to 
the Superintendent that the sessions be continued on that 
basis. 

The attention of the citizens is called to a plan that has 
been established in the High School, known as the Councilor- 
Teacher plan, whereby each teacher is to give particular atten- 
tion to a specified group of students, and to whom these stu- 
dents are to turn for advice in regard to their courses of study 
and plans for future educational training. It is hoped that by 
means of this arrangement the students .will be able to avail 
themselves more readily of the experience and knowledge of 
the teacher.'and on the other hand, the teacher, having as- 
sumed a degree of responsibility for the development of certain 
specified students, will be able by advice, and if necessary by 
the use of stronger methods, to keep the students alive to the 
need of keeping their work up to the standards required for 
securing the benefits of the High School training. Parents and 
guardians of students in the High School can help very mate- 
rially in the proper development of this plan by consulting 
frequently with the teacher under whose supervision the 
students in whom they are particularly interested are placed. 

Physical training in the schools is being developed, and the 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 1 5 



School Committee believes that this branch of the work should 
gradually be made more effective. 

The appearance of the school grounds has been greatly 
improved, and the Committee desires to maintain them in such 
a condition that the school yards will always be considered as 
an ornament and not a detriment to the appearance 
of the town. Consideration is being given to the 

need of straightening the back line of the property on Central 
Street in order to give more play room out doors in the rear of 
the school buildings. 

It is very strongly urged that parents and guardians of the 
students in the schools keep a careful watch on the school 
work, and that any matters needing attention be reported at 
once to the proper school authorities. The School Committee, 
and all others who are connected with the schools in any official 
capacity, are most anxious that the schools of Ipswich be made 
the best that is possible with the resources the town has avail- 
able for educational purposes, and we ask the co-operation of 
all citizens of the town to that end. 

The School Committee appreciates the work done during 
the year by the Superintendent, Piincipals, Teachers, and Offi- 
cers, and with a full realization of the difficult!' s that have been 
overcome, congratulates them on the progress that I as been 
made. 

The careful perusal of the report of the Superintendent and 
other officials is earnestly requested. 

Respectfully submitted for the School Committee of Ips- 
wich by 

Herbert W. Mason, Chairman 
Dr. George E. MacArthur 
Howard N. Doughty 
William J. Riley 
Luther Wait 
Joseph W. Ross 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



To the Citizens of the Town of Ipswich: — 

The Committee believes that its duty is to keep the school 
work immune from disturbing influences due to the war and to 
maintain the schools, in the face of unusual conditions, at the 
highest possible standard. 

The Committee and Superintendent are considering placing 
the High School on a two-session basis at the beginning of the 
next school year. There seems to be a general agreement on 

the part of educational authorities that a two-session plan in the 
High School is productive of better results. 

The Committee refers to this questio n in order that it may 
receive the careful thought and consideration of the people of 
the town before the change is made. It hopes by the beginning 
of the next school year to be able to arrive at an intelligent de- 
cision as to whether or not it is advisable to change the present 
arrangement. In the working out of this problem the Commit- 
tee will welcome suggestions that will help it to a wise solution. 

Another phase of the school work which should receive 
our attention at this time is the question of physical training. 
It is possible that this will be made compulsory by the legisla- 
ture, but if that is not done the Committee feels that it is a mat- 
ter that should have our earnest consideration. This is referred 






IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



17 



to in the reports of the school officials. The Committee asks 

the citizens to give the matter careful attention, as the feeling of 
the Committee is that a beginning, at least, in physical training 
should be made by the time the schools open in the Fall. 

The attention of our citizens is called to the great import- 
ance of making our schools more effective in educational re- 
sults than ever before, to meet the needs of a generation that 
will leave school to enter a world that will be changed in many 
ways. This is not a time for decreasing educational opportu- 
nity, and in asking for the appropriation that has been submit- 
ted, we feel that the money could not be used to better advan- 
tage than in making our schools more successful than before. 

In closing this report the Committee desire to express their 
thanks and appreciation to the Superintendent, Principals, 
teachers and officers for their excellent work. 
Respectfully submitted, 

HERBERT W. MASON, Chairman. 

HOWARD N. DOUGHTY 

GEORGE E. Mac ARTHUR 

WILLIAM J. RILEY 

JOSEPH W. ROSS 

LUTHER WAIT 

School Committee of Ipswich. 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 



To the School Committee of Ipswich, Mass. 

Gentlemen: — 

I herewith submit for your consideration the 
following report of the progress and condition of our schools. 
This is the 1 6th annual report issued from this office and it will 
contain, in addition to the usual survey of these schools, such 
suggestions and recommendations for the coming year as to me 
seem necessary for their continued well-being and advance- 
ment. 

The progress of our schools has not been interrupted, as 
was the case last year, by any serious epidemics. There has 

been a great deal of whooping-cough, measles, etc., which has 
brought the attendance to a lower level than we wished it to 
reach. 

This could not be helped. The School Nurse and the 

School Physician have both shown commendable interest in the 
work and but for the prompt attention they have given all these 
cases our attendance record would be much lower than it is today. 

No small credit for the results obtained belongs to the At- 
tendance Officer. His efforts have been willingly seconded by 
the members of the Police force, and both of these departments 
of our town government have performed their duty in a very 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



satisfactory manner. The duties of the Attendance Officer 

have demanded continuous work of the most strenuous type. 
There are repeated instances in which the whole town has been 
covered in a single day. In his quest for truants he has discov- 
ered more by-ways and out-of-the-way places than I ever sup- 
posed this town contained. 

But the work is not completed. The very nature of the 

case forbids any such conclusion. But a beginning has been 

made, and by the aid of all those having authority and interest 
in this matter, we hope for still more improvement along this 
line of our work. 

There is still a considerable amount of waste in all our 
teaching. The teacher is doing too much, and the pupil too 

little for himself. This is perfectly natural and could be readily 
excused were it not for the fact that the child must be trained to 
do and to think for himself to the fullest possible extent. We 
really know "only what he can do," and too frequently a well- 
intentioned help becomes a positive hindrance. 

The work of the grades needs more attention. The classes, 
as a rule, are too large to allow 7 the teacher to devote sufficient 
time to the backward pupils. Where these are allowed to ac- 
cumulate year after year, we have a very dull class finally that 
has very httle interest in the work and is without courage to ad- 
vance. Provision must be made to meet the needs of these in- 
dividual differences in ability by giving personal attention and 
encouragement when first discovered. 

Strict grading will not reach the difficulty. In fact it only 

intensifies it. By this selective agency the slower pupils are re- 
jected and the brighter ones are allowed to advance. The jus- 
tification of this method is built upon the idea that the arbitrary 
standard set up by the school is adequate and capable of fitting 
every cast of mind. This is false. We need individuality and 
we should modify our methods until they most efficiently meet 



20 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



the individual needs of every child, or group of children. 

We are planning to have our grade teachers become better 
acquainted with the best methods of group teaching and we are 
anticipating some very good results. It seems but fair that the 
school should put forth some of its energies upon a class of 
children who, while not brilliant in the assigned subjects of the 
school, frequently become, in after life, the leaders in the com- 
munity. 

The Junior High School, under the leadership of Miss Kate 
Sullivan and Miss Isabel Arthur, is doing very good work. The 
pupils are attentive and interested in their work. The teachers 
themselves are working hard and deserve much credit for the 
success attained. 

This was an experiment and, in the minds of not a few, a 
very doubtful one. But everything is moving smoothly and 

good progress is being made. 

We are planning for more intensive work in this school, so 
that there will be less need of so much review work when the 
High School is reached. 

Some of the Senior High School teachers have classes here 
in one or more subjects. In this way the teacher becomes ac- 
quainted with the pupil before he reaches tbe Senior High 
School and is better qualified to suggest courses to be pursued, 
as well as to provide for his individual needs. 

The Principal's report appears in another part of this re- 
port. 

Mr. Marston, the Principal of the Senior High School, says 
that his school is doing better work than ever before, and this 
statement is borne out by my own personal observation. The 
discipline is excellent; the spirit of the school is fine. . Mr. 
Marston, and some of the teachers, return to school every after- 
noon but Friday to work with the pupils. 

At the present we have too large a number of small classes. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL RERORT. 21 



These require just as much of the teacher's time and effort as 
would a class four or five times as large, and the expense per 
pupil is four or five times as much. 

By some this would be considered a "good" fault, since it 
arises from the large number of courses offered. These may 
be reduced somewhat and a minimum limit set for any class. 
It is hardly to be expected that a small high school like ours 
should offer all the subjects taught in the larger schools. But 
in this, too, we want to be very generous. 

We hope to see larger classes in physics and chemistry an- 
other 3'ear. These are important subjects and more pupils 
should select the courses in which they are found. 

A class in Spanish and another in astronomy were started 
last September. Both of these classes are above the average in 
size and show much interest in their respective subjects. Our 
schools must provide for the leisure as well as for the activities 
of the coming generation; and no pupil should graduate from 
our High School without having some knowledge of the nat- 
ural objects about him. A single term, given to botany or zo- 
ology, or mineralogy or astronomy, might not have much sci- 
entific or commercial value nor yield any large financial returns; 
but it would have a cultural value and become a source of en- 
joyment through the after life of the pupil. A bird club or a 
botany club or, combining the two, a nature club would be a 
good thing for these young people. It would furnish a good, 
wholesome, and healthful form of recreation and add immense- 
ly to their knowledge and pleasure. If we could but read the 
book of nature aright, we should be wiser and better. 

We have a teacher in the High School who is peculiarly 
well-fitted by training and by taste to organize and conduct 
such an activity. Quite a little has already been done in this 

direction. Tentative plans have been made and the co-opera- 
tion and support of some of our good townspeople have been 



22 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPOR1 



secured. We hope that with the opening of Spring a sufficient 
number of pupils will become interested in this work and lay 
the foundations, at least, for an active, wide-awake, enthusiastic 
nature club. 

Pupils in this school do not make sufficient use of our pub- 
lic library, nor of magazines nor periodicals. This furnishes a 
source of training that should not be neglected. To do so is to 
bar the most frequented and most direct way to the broad fields 
of knowledge. No text-book ever contained all of the informa- 
tion upon any subject, or even a single phase of the subject, of 
which it assumes to treat. The pupil must make habitual use 

of the resources mentioned above if he is to secure the largest 
measure of benefit from the study of an}- subject. Not only 

does this give him the latest and most authoritative information, 
free from that bias and prejudice so often found in the treat- 
ment by the text-book: not only does it reveal to him that there 
are two sides to every question, thereby engendering a love for 
fair play and judicial conclusions: but it also shows him the way 
to all knowledge. Once the taste for information is acquired, 
once this habit of seeking it out is established, that 003- s educa- 
tion is assured. Moreover, it is a training fcr life: and long 
after the school door is closed against him. he will tread the 
peaceful way that leads to knowledge and the service of his 
fellow men. 

But let it be remembered that the pupil will not do this vol- 
untarily and of his own free will and accord. He must be 
taught here, as in everything else. If this method, which is 'in 
very general use, were the established usage or this school, 
there would be very little trouble in giving him the right start. 
But he must get it. 

In a democracy like ours, or what ours may become, more 
attention must be given to the individual needs and aptitudes of 
every pupil. It is unjust and unfair to this large and worthy 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 23 



minority that we plan courses of study and insist upon a curri- 
culum that largely overlooks and ignores this class of pupils. 
Especially should v/e give them fuller consideration when we 
are thus constantly brought face to face with the acknowledged 
fact that it is from this class that industrial and commercial and 
political leaders are frequently recruited. 

The day is gone by, let us hope forever, when all children 
are to be held to a hard-and-fast course or program. We need 
this diversity of gifts in society as it exists today. The value of 
individual leadership is fully recognized and appreciated. Why 
should we not make larger effort to develop these qualities. 

Prescribed courses in reading with a reasonable degree of 
latitude will enable every pupil to follow out certain desired 
lines of investigation which, for obvious reasons, the courses of 
study cannot supply. 

Herein lies the schools opportunity, and the sagacious 
teacher who builds upon this foundation of developing a love 
for good books is doing a very constructive work. 

Mr. Marston has made a beginning along another import- 
ant and valuable line of work, and that is the old-time declama- 
tion and essay. The advantages of such work are so thoroughly 
understood that I will not discuss them here. Every pupil 

in the school should prepare, at least, two each for every year 
of school life. They should be required to make the most care- 
ful preparation; they should rehearse their parts under a teach- 
er with some elocutionary ability, and should deliver the same 
from the platform in an intelligent, dignified and impressive 
manner. This standard of excellence should be insisted upon 
and maintained throughout the whole exercise. Later on as the 
spirit of debate develops, we may endeavor to organize a de- 
bating club, which will be able to challenge similar clubs from 
the surrounding High Schools. Both boys and girls would be eli- 
gible to membership and both pleasure and profit would be 



24 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



derived from such an activity. We hope that the pupils will 

manifest such an interest in this matter that a real, wide-awake, 
successful debating club in our school may become an assured 
fact. 

How pleased we should all be to have the pennant come 
to the High School ! 

Current events should have a larger place in all our schools, 
especially in the High School. The world's history is being 

made very rapidly, and tremendous changes are bound to fol- 
low. The variety and scope of our activities have increased 
many fold within the last two years. No one is able to keep 
fully abreast of the times, but everyone should keep in touch 
with the larger factors in the situation. 

All of our pupils should be required to make a report upon 
such topics as have a direct bearing upon present conditions, at 
least, once each week. In no case should they be excused from 
such work; and the larger the place given, to such topics in the 
other activities of the school, as subjects for language lessons, 
compositions, essays, etc., the more vital our teaching will be- 
come. Let us have more of this very necessary work in all our 
schools, even if the time be taken that is usually devoted to 
other subjects. 

As an inducement to more extended reading by the pupils 
of the school, a few magazines have been subscribed for, and 
these come regularly to the reading table in the upper hall. To 
supplement these and to assist in the good work, some friends 
of the school have loaned other standard publications, or have 
given them to the school outright. With the additions which 

we are in hopes to make from time to time, we shall soon have 
sufficient good reading material to supply a portion of our 
needs, and the Public Library will supply the rest. The school 
library, too, is being restored to a usable condition, and then we 
shall be fairly well supplied for work along this line. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 25 



Right here let it be said that the pupils who use this library 
under the supervision and direction of the teacher will be get- 
ting quite as valuable knowledge as the information furnished 
by the book. They will acquire a taste for good books and 

learn how to select them, and thus be assured of a most profit- 
able use of their time. 

But, as I have already said in another connection, the pupil 
must be trained to do this. It will not be sufficient simply to 

tell him what to read, and take it for granted that he has done 
so. He must be tried and tested on the subject treated in the 
book, just the same as in any other school work. And if it is 
found that he was negligent, that his reading was superficial 
and that he failed to get what was expected, he should be re- 
quired to read and to re-read it until it was clear that he had 
succeeded in his task. Books are tools to be used and not to 
be fooled with. Reading must be directed and, in most cases, 
it should be limited to those lines indicated by the aptitude, the 
purpose, or the individual needs of the pupil. 

- Too much indiscriminate reading adds but little if anything 
to our intellectual or moral resources, and should be displaced 
by something that will materially develop both mind and char- 
acter. Therefore the reading must be directed by the teacher 
and the results should be measured and tested as in all subjects. 

The teaching in all our schools needs to be more thorough- 
ly vitalized. The work of the world and of the school should 
be brought into closer relationship. The textbook should be 

more fully supplemented, or supplanted, by a knowledge of the 
most advanced, most comprehensive, and the most scientific 
practices in use along the various lines of world activities. 
There should be a larger background of fact and methods. 

The world is our market, and the school must strive to 
supply it with what is required for the enlightenment and up- 
building of all. The world is the great university to which our 



26 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



teachers must go, if they are to be well-fitted for the tasks of 
the school. The schools do not lead; they follow. That school 
is doing its work best that keeps closest to the line of such ac- 
tivities and needs. 

An effort has been made this year to have a closer articu- 
lation between the work of the drawing supervisor and that of 
the Manual Training Department. Mr. Lunt, while still re- 

quired to do some repair work for the instruction and benefit 
of his classes, has been excused in a large degree from doing 
outside work as in times past. He is to assume the role of 
instructor rather than that of school carpenter. 

The pupils have been required to make a drawing to scale 
of every object they are to make at the bench. In the higher 

grades, the work is to be done from blue-prints which the pu- 
pils prepare under the direction of the teacher. This work 
shows much improvement, 

The careful measurements required in this work give a 
practical application of the theory learned from the text book, 
and strengthen both the work of the grades and of the shop. 
We feel that a good start has been made in the right direction 
and that the pupils themselves have begun to realize something 
of vital connection betweeen the school and the world outside. 

A larger place has been given to the subject of Mechanical 
Drawing. This was made necessary by the increased demand 
for draughtsmen as well as the growing importance of the sub- 
ject itself as a necessary part of an educational equipment. 
The pupils themselves are taking a deeper interest in the work, 
especially those who are preparing for higher schools where 
this subject is an elective, or a required subject for admission. 
It is becoming a very necessary mode of expression today, and 
is rapidly winning its way to a fuller and well-deserved recog- 
nition. 

Our next step will be towards a closer co-ordination of 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 27 



drawing with the subjects as geography, history and literature, 
and physics. This will open up the field of illustration and 
possibly discover to us a few incipient artists whose powers will 
be given a larger scope in the field of nature study to be taken 
up shortly. 

Singing, especially in the High School, though far below 
our ideal of what High School singing should be, has made a 
distinct gain in the last year. Every morning, chapel is held in 
the school hall and singing forms a large part of this important 
service. More pupils are taking part in these exercises and 

they enter into them with more enthusiasm. A finer spirit is 

noticeable throughout the school, which I attribute in no small 
degree to the influence of these morning services. 

No one questions the value of singing in our schools, es- 
pecially in times like these. The spirit of patriotism should be 
thoroughly implanted in the hearts of young people; and music, 
or singing, is conceded by all to be the best agency for accom- 
plishing this important work. 

Here again, we need more time for the proper develop- 
ment of this important subject Little can be accomplished 
with but one lesson a week, and we are in hopes erelong to see 
music take its rightful place among the other subjects taught in 
the school. 

We want to see a genuine appreciation of good music 
counted as one of the most necessary accomplishments in our 
schools. Such a condition would reflect great credit upon our 
educational work and become a source of pleasure and enjoy- 
ment to our community for years to come. Let us have more 
time for our music; let us have more music, and better music. 

For a better consideration of this subject I wish to refer 
you to the Supervisor of Music's report to be found in another 
par of this report. 

Upon the death of Miss Nutter, notice of which has been 



28 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



given farther along in this report, Miss Alice K. Lockwood of 
North Grafton, Mass., was elected to fill the vacancy. 

This young lady is a graduate of Framingham State Normal 
School and comes to us well recommended. In fact, she has 

already received a call from another town, but was induced to 
remain with us through the persuasive influence of an agency 
that has been invoked on similar previous occasions. So far. it 
has never failed us, but signs of weariness are becoming per- 
ceptible. 

We are endeavoring to carry along the work upon the lines 
established by Miss Nutter. As heretofore our efforts will be 

guaged by the requirements of the good, average American 
home. Waste or extravagance will not be tolerated. A prac- 
tical training in all that true home-making implies and requires 
will still be our aim and purpose in this department. 

Our purposes to further strengthen the work of these class- 
es lie along three main lines of endeavor: 

1st. By increasing the opportunities of the pupils for a 
more vitals and practical knowledge of the various mate- 
rial made use of in the home by personal visits to the places 
where such material is sold. Here, under the instruction of the 
teacher and the shop-keeper himself, these pupils should be 
able to gain considerable information in reference to qualities 
and values of many materials. 

2nd. By increasing the opportunities for gaining a fuller 
knowledge of the sources of production, processes of manufac- 
ture, methods of transportation, and the seasons when fruits and 
vegetables are most abundant, and cheapest. This will require 
the use of reference books and closer co-ordination of the sub- 
jects taught in the other departments. 

3rd. By extending the work of this school to include the 
'making over" of articles of clothing, knitting, and millinery. 

As an auxiliary to the Red Cross movement, this department 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 29 



is at present doing such work as the local branch of the Senior 
Red Cross Association provides, and this requires. a knowledge 
of the art of knitting. 

All the activities of this department center upon the art and 
science of home-making. 

If we appreciate our homes as we should, if "we realize 
their value as an individual and a national asset, then let us 
give to this department all the wise planning, all the intelligent 
thought, and all the moral and financial support to which it is 
justly entitled. 

During the past year a School Nurse hasl been given 
a place upon our teaching force. 

Through an arrangement made by the School Physician 
and the Trustees of the Coburn Home, the services of Miss Mar- 
tha J. Stewart were secured for this most important work. In 
this we were extremely fortunate; and we deeply appreciate 
the broad and generous spirit which was shown in the interest 
of the school by the several parties in the matter. 

Miss Stewart is well known among us. She is familiar with 
the home-life of a large majority of our pupils, and she brings 
to her work all those qualities of mind and heart that have al- 
ready secured for her a large place in the confidence and es- 
teem of this community. 

In her work here she has been especially helpful in looking 
up cases of reported sickness, and in securing proper medical 
attendance where the cases demanded it. She has reported 

back to this office all cases that were of a contagious nature, 
and thus assisted in preventing what otherwise might have be- 
come an epidemic. 

On the other hand, in cases of slight indisposition so prev- 
alent among children — the pupils have been sent to school 
where their work suffered but slight interruption. Minor inju- 
ries have received her personal attention; while, in more serious 



30 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



cases, the pupil has been accompanied to the hospital. For a 
list of such cases see School Nurse's Report. The sanitary con- 
ditions have been looked after, and children who were detained 
at home on account of insufficient clothing were reported to the 
proper authorities. 

Everything pertaining to the health and comfort of the pu- 
pil has been looked after. A single bed with suitable bed 
clothing has been installed in the Winthrop School, and here 
Miss Stewart teaches the pupils how to make up a bed for the 
sick, how to change the bed clothing under a sick person with 
the least discomfort possible; how to make and apply bandages, 
dress wounds, etc. 

The care of the body, bathing, cleanliness, exercise, sleep, 
care of the teeth, etc., all come in for a proper share of atten- 
tion. We feel safe in saying that the practical instruction given 
here will result in an increasing physical and intellectual vigor. 

The School Physician's report which is appended will give 
some idea of what has been done in his department. With the 
increased filing facilities just installed, we shall have as com- 
plete a system of physical records as may be found. 

With the essential needs of this department fairly well sup- 
plied, with the cordial co-operation of the School Nurse, the 
School Physician and the representative of the Board thor- 
oughly established, we shall be in a position to do some good 
work along the line of prevention of sickness. 

This will insure to this generation and to the generations 
to come many important physical advantages of which the war- 
ring nations of the world will soon, if not already, stand in 
great need, 

I wish to call your attention specifically to that part of the 
School Physician's report whiich deals with the subject of phy- 
sical training in all our schools. I feel that his suggestions and 
conclusions are timely, logical, and sound, and I shall warmly 



IPSWICH SCHOOL RERORT. 31 



second all his efforts towards giving our boys and girls the 
best possible equipment for life — a sound mind in a sound 
body. 

The report of the Night School has to do necessarily with 
the classes of 1916-1917. The school usually begins the last 
of October and continues through the winter months of Novem- 
ber, Deeember, January and February, and closes about the 
first of March. This gives two periods of about ten weeks each 
with a week or ten days vacation at Christmas time. 

Acting upon the suggestions of the Commissioner of Edu- 
cation at Washington, D. C, we advertised the opening of school 
by inserting notices in the press and by distributing posters 
►rinted in three different languages. Every reasonable effort is 
made to acquaint our people with the nature, scope and pur- 
pose of the school, and every inducement was held out to them 
to make use of its privileges and enjoy its advantages. Offers 
r ere made to teach any subject desired, provided a class of 
twenty members could be formed. Notwithstanding all this, 

few indeed of our native citizens availed themselves of these 
•pportunities or made any response to these appeals. Not so 
r ith the other portions of our population. These people, han- 
licapped as they are, made a generous response and continued 
in the school until its close. They are eager to learn and come 
to school with a purpose to accomplish something, and they 
succeed. 

The school, though not large, showed considerable activity 
in all departments. In addition to the elementary subjects, 

bookkeeping, typewriting and stenography were taken up, but 
these classes were so reduced by non-attendance that we were 
obliged to discontinue them before the school closed. 

The fact that attendance here • is not wholly compulsory 
should not be overlooked. By law, all non-English speaking 

ersons between 16 and 21 years of age are obliged to attend 



32 IPSWICH SCHOOL' REPORT. 



evening school. Nearly 50 per sent of the attendance was well 
above this age limit. Many of the pupils were above 30 years 
of age and in one or two instances the pupil had reached the 
age of 35. This tells its own story and gives conclusive evi- 
dence that these pupils realized the value of an education and 
were willing to make sacrifices in order to obtain it. 

These classes were well attended through both terms, 
showed a lively interest in their work and made good pro- 
gress. 

The closing exercises of the school was made the great 
occasion of the year. School officials, parents and friends were 
invited to attend. The program consisted of selections for 

reading and recitation, singing by the school* and music by the 
Greek orchestra. 

At the close, Dr. George E.. MacArthur commended the 
work of the school, urged the pupils to continue their work 
along the same line, and then presented them with their certifi- 
cates of credit for the work done. 

I have dwelt purposely upon the details of these closing 
exercises of the Night School, for, it seems to me, they possess 
a deeper meaning, a broader significance, than we realize. To be 
sure it was a small assembly, with little or nothing to interest or 
attact the attention of any but those whose presence was de- 
manded by a sense of duty. Yet, in a larger sense, it was the 
concrete expression of that broader American spirit which re- 
sists ignorance and guarantees to all within our borders those 
educational foundation principles upon which all our liberties 
are built, 

Is it the appreciation of this fact that makes the foreign- 
born portion of our citizens so anxious and determined to se- 
cure the advantages offered by our schools? If so, 
let our native-born American begin now to follow their ex- 
ample. 






IPSWICH SCHOOL RERORT. 



33 



It was found that pupils entering the High School were not 
only unfamiliar with the use of the dictionary but were ignorant 
of the methods of using it. Diacritical marks gave no assist- 

ance in pronunciation and primary and secondary accent with- 
held their aid. To the pupils these things were meaningless 
hieroglyphics. A search of the book-shelves revealed the fact 
that we were possessed of a very few copies of partially worn 
books too few in number and unfit for distribution. Two hun- 
dred new books have been purchased and divided equally be- 
tween the Junior and Senior High Schools. This number will 
be increased later on, so that each pupil above the 5th grade 
may have a copy for his own use. 

A good supply of supplementary readers for the lower 
grades has been purchased; and, barring accident, these will be 
sufficient for some time to come. The books selected cover a 
large variety of subjects and should arouse the interest of the 
little folks who are to use them. Our aim in the selection has 
been to secure such books as will tend, through their style and 
content, to create in the minds of the little ones a real love for 
reading, and thus to open the door to the vast stores of knowl- 
edge laid up in books. The good results from the use of these 
new books are already apparent. 

A new set of cabinet files has been installed in the Super- 
intendent's office. 1 his was taken in exchange for the old one 
which was wholly inadequate for the needs of that department, 
and will furnish full accommodation for the needs of the High 
School, the Commercial Department, and the Superintend- 
ent. 

The government is offering $1200. per annum for filing 
clerks. In view of this demand for such work we have endeav- 
ored to secure an up-to-date system whereby the pupils of the 
Commercial Department may be taught the art of filing. The 

Walker-Shaw Company, through whom the exchange was made, 



34 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



have agreed to install the system and to instruct our teachers in 
the latest and best methods employed. 

Our school rooms are now well supplied with globes, 
maps, and charts. With this new equipment for teaching geog- 
raphy, we expect the subject will be brought up to a higher 
standard of excellence and that the pupils will have a fuller 
comprehension of what they are studying. If they do not, the 
fault will not lie at the door of equipment. 

The School Physicians office in the Winthrop School has 
been fitted up with scales for weighing and measuring, an 
emergency kit, and a single bed to be used in case of illness 
among the pupils. 

The Domestic Science Department has been supplied with 
nutrition charts and books of reference and an encyclopedia 
dealing with the manufacture of various kinds of foods. 

Charts, maps and a filing cabinet have been purchased for 
the Commercial Geography division, and a large number of 
Government Bulletins has been obtained for use in various 
classes throughout the different schools. 

A few reference books have been placed on the teachers' 
desks, as helps in their daily work. These also furnish topics 
for discussion at teachers' meetings and are to become the nu- 
cleus of a teachers' professional library. 

Teachers' meetings are held once a fortnight — the first and 
third Wednesday in each month in the Manning School build- 
ing at 3:45 p. m. 

We welcome the presence of anyone, whether teacher or 
not, who is interested in educational matters and invite all to 
take part in discussing the topics under consideration. If we 

can induce more of the parents to attend we shall be highly 
gratified and we feel assured that a new impetus will be given 
to our teaching. 

The usual method of proceedure is to have one or more 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 35 



papers read by teachers to whom special subjects have been 
previously assigned, and then to engage in a discussion of these 
papers. 

As a sample of the topics taken up, let me mention a few: 

Miss Lucy Ardell Kimball on the Teaching of Reading in 
the First Grade. 

Miss Nellie Sullivan on Penmanship and How to Get the 
Best Results. 

Miss Emma Bell on Silent Reading. 

This work was illustrated by a small class from her own 
room. • 

Mr. Jackman is to have a paper on How to Teach History. 

These meetings have been productive of much good. The 
teachers have entered into the work with considerable enthu- 
siasm, have done some professional reading, and have gained 
new courage and inspiration from the interchange of ideas. 

I am planning for an address by some professional edu- 
cator in the near future, notice of which will be given in the 
public press. 

Our grade teachers are working for teachers' certificates in 
penmanship. These will be a most valuable acquisition, a pos- 
itive asset, in their list of resources, Very few evening lectures 
or entertainments have been given this winter on account of the 
shortage of fuel. As soon the weather and fuel situations im- 
prove, we are in hopes to be able to resume this line of school 
activities. 



Recommendations. 

Some of the recommendations of last year were not carried 
out for what were deemed good and sufficient reasons. The 
excessive cost of materials and labor had a deterrent effect 



36 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



upon all expenditure where comfort or convenience alone was 
involved. Only in those cases demanding immediate consid- 
eration did we feel justified in making repairs or purchases of 
any kind; and this policy, I feel sure, you will continue until 
such time as more normal conditions prevail. 

With this understanding of the matter, I repeat such of 
those old recommendations as I deem of importance — some of 
them more remote than immediate — and include them in one 
general list with those made necessary by more recent de- 
mands. 

Repairs. 

Minor or general repairs are always in order in every school 
plant and must be provided for. Fortunately these are rela- 

tively inexpensive and a moderate lump sum is usually sufficient 
to meet all such requirements. 

But with the larger items the case is altogether different, 
These call for larger expenditure and should be undertaken 
only after every phase of the proposed change has been care- 
fully considered by competent judges and the promise of the 
advantages sought is reasonably assured. 

And the first case to which I ask your consideration is of 
this nature: 

During the exceptionally cold -weather this winter it has 
been impossible to heat some of the lower rooms in the Man- 
ning School. There seems to be no way of regulating the sup- 
ply of heat which is altogether insufficient. The temperature 
of the upper hall may range between 80 and 90 degrees, with 
all valves and doors closed, while that of some of the lower 
rooms will be from 40 to 50 degrees. Of course we all know 
that the weather this winter has been unusually cold, but these 
are the times when heat is needed, and for which ample 






IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 37 



provision should be made. 

The expert who was called into the case, gave it as his 
opinion that the chimney itself was not high enough and recom- 
mended an addition of about twenty feet. Mr. Cleghorn him- 
self informed me that the chimney itself should be seventy feet, 
and suggested that a sheet iron stack of 15 to 20 feet be added 
to the present chimney to test out the correctness of his theory. 
This has been done and a very noticeable improvement in the 
draft has resulted, 

At present the combustion is very imperfect and therefore 
wasteful. With the addition made as suggested the saving in 
fuel would soon offset the initial expense. 

The coal bunkers, too. originally intended for soft coal, are 
wholly inadequate, The floors are uneven, the bins are irregu- 
lar and so irconvenlent that the fireman's strength and endurance 
are taxed to the breaking point, 

Unless there is some good reason, unknown to me, for not 
disturbing things as they are, I would suggest that the soil be 
excavated to a sufficient depth, the floors carefully graded to the 
level of the boiler room; the front partition set back sufficiently 
so as to allow the fireman to clean the boiler, and to perform 
his many other duties under more favorable conditions. At 
present the place is a veritable man-killer; as our former janitor 
frequently declared, 

These changes would give sufficient capacity for storing a 
supply of coal that would carry us nearly through the year and 
allow us to take advantage of the market, in making our pur- 
chases of fuel. The labors of the fireman also would be con- 
siderably lightened. 

Most of the floors in the Manning School haee never been 
relaid. After forty-five years of almost continuous wear, it is 
not strange if they have become unsightly, unsanita^, and im- 
possible to thoroughly cleanse. By relaying the floors of one 



3# IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



or two rooms each season, the expense would be spread over 
a series of years, and would not prove burdensome. 

Our system of repairs should include a provision for paint- 
ing one, at least, of our school buildings each year. Buildings, 
unless well cared for, depreciate very rapidly, and to withhold 
a coat of paint when actually needed is not economy. 

Neglected school property of any kind gives an undesira- 
ble impression and is a strong evidence of the lack of civic and 
educational interest in a community. We are not seeking nor 
deserving of any such notoriety. m 

The purchase of a copper boiler for the Domestic Science 
Department, a band-saw and a turning-lathe for the Manual 
Training Department as recommended last year, was not made 
on account of the present excessive cost of these articles. I ad- 
vise a further postponement of the matter until prices return to 
a more normal level. 

The unsanitary arrangements at some of our schools call 
for earnest consideration, The improvements are greatly need- 
ed; and, but for the excessive cost, -would have been made dur- 
ing the year just closed. Possibly you will deem it essential 
that these be made in one or more of these schools this year. 

The recommendation made last year for a six hour day of 
two sessions for our High School, was not carried out, as it was 
thought that some of the older boys might be of assistance in 
harvesting the crops. But in this we were disappointed; they 
did not care to work in the field. 

Accepting this as an evidence that the boys preferred to 
remain in school; we have again asked your attention to thi: 
very important change in our High School program. 

This plan has the unqualified endorsement cf educators 
throughout the country. Our own State Board of Education 

has repeatedly urged its adoption. The generally accepted 

opinion that the present furnishes golden opportunities for 



IPSWICH SCHOOL RERORT. 59 



young men and young women with a good, broad educational 
training, should induce both parents and pupils to demand the 
largest possible returns from our educational equipment. Our 
sense of patriotic duty should impel us to make every prepara- 
tion for a future that will be fraught with tremendous responsi- 
bilities, upon whose faithful discharge will depend the welfare 
of both the individual and the nation. 

A closer articulation between the Junior and Senior High 
Schools calls for this change. This will result in a closer gra- 
ding, a broader scholarship and a saving in expense. 1 feel 
that it is demanded by every consideration of the physical, in- 
tellectual and moral well-being of our youth. 

Let us consider briefly some of the objections to the pres- 
ent method; and, in doing this, let us confine ourselves to the 
three-fold nature of the child for whose highest development 
we are striving. 

Prof. Holmes of Harvard University in his enunciation of 
the fundamental principles of education says this: "In the total 
preparation of the individual for a life at once significant to 
himself (by reason of the varied and profitable exercise of his 
powers) and useful to society (by reason of the organization of 
his activities under socially valuable purposes) it is the function 
of the school: first, in its equipment, program, and proceedure 
to guard and promote the pupil's physical development!'' 

First of all, then, let us examine into the physical aspects 
of the case and see if our children are all that they should be 
physically, or if they are surrounded hy those conditions or cir- 
cumstances best calculated to promote that development whose 
perfection is to be found in the strong, vigorous, up-standing 
man — a tremendous asset in itself. 

Are they? Let us hear what others have to say on this 
point. Said a good friend of all our school children to a 
member of our School Board last graduation: "How small your 



40 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



children are." "They look anaemic, as if they were not well 
nourished." ''Do they have physical training?" 

This from a member of the freshman class: "Comes 

twelve o'clock, it seems as though I could eat my desk. But 
when I get home at quarter of two, I cant eat anything." 

Again, we have a boy in one of the grades that has been 
under observation since last September, — we have several of 
them of course, but in this particular case, the teacher is making 
this pupil the subject of her studies along the line of retarded 
development. I am giving you a verbatim copy of the letter 
which was returned with the paper which had been forwarded 
for examination and which, I am pleased to say, received the 
rank of "A". 

"This is one of the most interesting expressions of under- 
standing of a child's characteristics with the consequent framing 
which has come to my desk. It is a real contribution to child- 
study, and I am taking the liberty of copying it. 

"I am interested to know more about this boy. / infer that 
he is under -nourished, that he has not an intelligently provided diet, and 
that his habits of living both as regards sleep and the program 
of his working hours may be hap-hazard." 

Our school begins at 8:30. I will ask you to judge of the 
amount of breakfast the average child in the average home will 
partake of these winter mornings — even where proper food in 
sufficient quantity is provided, and even -where he is forced to 
arise in proper season. Will it be sufficient to carry him 

through until nearly two o'clock, even when supplemented by 
a cold lunch? 

Let it be remembered that these are young children, some 
of them just entering upon the period of adolescence, when 
every care should be given to the full, well-rounded develop- 
ment of the whole body. 

Proper physical development is conditioned upon proper 









IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 41 



food, taken at regular and reasonable intervals of time, and in 
proper amounts. Any deviation from this rule, especially in 
the case of growing children, results disastrously to the individ- 
ual and to society at large. We cannot violate the laws of 
nature with impunity. The iniquities of the fathers will surely 
be visited upon the children and there can be no escape. In- 
capacity, unhappiness, and suffering are too much in evidence. 
The schools should become a powerful agency in overcoming 
thes^ evils, by building up a strong, vigorous, virile type of man- 
hood. 

Let it never be said of them, that they were unfaithful to 
their great trust or that they were deliberately neglectful of their 
obligations and opportunities. 

Secondly, would the proposed change result beneficially 
when considered from the intellectual point of view? 

Every one is aware that subjects and courses have multi- 
plied almost beyond belief in the last few years. In fact, so 
rapidly have additions to our stock of knowledge been made 
and so great is their sum total today, that we have been obliged 
to content ourselves with just touching the high places of the 
range, and leaving the valleys to be filled in to such an extent 
and in such manner as the time at our disposal permitted. 

This has unavoidably led to a degree of superficiality in our 
work and furnished our critics the larger part of their offensive 
armament. 

Herein, then, lies the difference between the schools of 
yesterday and the schools of today. Then we had fewer sub- 
jects and sufficient time to teach them thoroughly. Today we 
have vastly more subjects and considerably less time, and 
mediocre results are inevitable. 

We must give the pupil the broadest possible outlook of 
the world and its manifold activities, his horizon must be ex- 
tended in all directions, in order that he may make a wise 



42 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



choice as to the particular field he may wish to occupy later on. 
We must do this for him, or else we shall fall short of our obli- 
gations; but we -must also give him the means whereby, when 
once placed, he may be enabled to earn a livelihood and main- 
tain his position among his fellowmen. The first course is dic- 
tated by an enlightened sense of the larger possibilities for the 
pupil; the last, by the inexorable demands of the times. The 

school attempts to supply both and partially fails in each. 

The one great pressing need, the one absolutely necessary 
factor in the situation, is time, and more time. With more time 
we could do more work and better work. Our pupils should 
have more time for reviews. More time is needed for drill and 
for driving home the fundamental principles upon which the 
various subjects are based; more time for clear straight think- 
ing. 

This would be of immense benefit to the pupil. It would 
help to a fuller comprehension of the old subject. It would 

lead to a better organization of ideas, and increase the power 
and capacity of application. It would answer the challenge of 
our critics and restore confidence in the work of our schools. 

We need time for many things in our schools that have 
been taken from our courses of study to make room for the 
"essentials." We should find time for more singing, for read- 
ing, spelling, declamation, ethics, civics, and earnest heart-to- 
heart talks with classes and individuals. With the longer day 
we could feel the time given up to a lecture or debate, or a 
concert, was not being purloined from the period of required 
study. 

The broader uses of the school would be more apparent to 
the pupil and his appreciation of its efforts and purposes as an 
important educational center, giving a fuller preparation for 
life, would be increased. He would bring more to the school 
and the school would give him more in return. More rational 



IPSWICH SCHOOL RERORT. 43 



methods of instruction could be used, more strength and vital- 
ity imparted to our teaching. The Jcnowledge gained would be 
tore thoroughly assimilated and possess a larger practical value 
ind application. Little by little he would realize that the school 
and the world were the necessary complements of each other; 
that the work of the schools is not merely an incident in, but 
an essential part of, the great scheme of life — a scheme in 
which he himself, more than an}'one^else, holds the largest and 
deepest personal interest. 

1 hirdly, would the change offer any possible advantages in 
the foundation of correct rabits and character building? It 

would be a steadying influence, certamly, and give a tinge of 
seriousness, an evidence of purpose, in the conduct of our pu- 
pils, of which in some cases there is a very marked absence. 

All that h^s been said in reference topromcting the inter- 
est of pupils in their work will apply with equal force in this 
connection. Industry and virtue have always been yoke-mates. 
The boy who can be made to apply himself successfully to his 
tasks is acquiring unconsciously those habits that will enable 
him to view life in its true perspective. With a little guidance 
he will become a valuable member of society. 

"Not so with the idler and the slacker." If we are to suc- 
ceed with him, more time must be given to a thorough sudy 
of his individual needs, and in planning corrective measures 
and methods. 

These pupils are not as a rule vicious, nor mentally defic- 
ient, They are simply lazy and weak in moral purpose. They 
need an enviroment that will most successfully impel to right 
conduct-an influence that is kindly, strong and continuous. The 
home and the school should have a larger share of the time ol 
these pupils, the street and the shop far less, if we are to cope 
successful^* with the evil influences that confront our youth at 
almost every tnrn. Taking the country over, the wreckage is 



44 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



appalling. 

There should be no divided responsibility in this matter. 
Between the school and the home there must be the closest co- 
ordination and co-operation, else our boys and girls will not 
get the right start in life. 

As I have said before, we need more time for those heart- 
to-heart talks with our pupils. There should be the closest, most 
cordial, and most friendly relations between the teacher and 
the pupils of his class. In the present rush and drive to get 

through, the only time the teacher has to win the confidence of 
his pupils is during the recitation. Here he may. by his 

ability and skill, be able to gain their respect and good-will. 
But he will never become their oracle, never secure that close 
and intimate friendship, which prompts them to seek his coun- 
sel and guidance in times of trouble. 

And this is just what our boys and girls most sorely need. It 
is the recognition of this fact that has brought the subject of vo- 
cational guidance so forcibly to our attention. \X e should go 
farther and have ethical and moral guidance as well. 

Yes, these heart-to-heart talks open a most promising and 
most satisfactory field. How often has a single word caught the 
attention of some seemingly careless boy or girl and given 
point and purpose to a life which afteward became a power 
for good and a benediction to the whole race! History is so 

full of instances of this kind that I will dwell no longer upon 
this point. 

And then the home influence. I claim that under the pres- 
ent arrangements the school is unconsciously and unavoidably 
antagonizing the home. \X hat chance has a boy or a girl to 

enjoy and partake of the pleasures of the home when lessons 
that should be learned are hanging like the sword of Damocles 
over his head? What a condition, when preparation of school 
work means banishment or failure in lessons as an alternative! 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 45 

I ; ; 

Lessons should be learned in school where the assistance of the 
teacher may be secured, if necessary. The child should be al- 
lowed a place in the home circle whose influence, in most cases, 
has been and should always be an immeasurable blessing. 

Let us bring then to this task of character building all the 
time, all!the wisdom, and all the patience at our command. 

Age of Admission. 

In our town the age at which children shall be admitted to 
school assumes somewhat of a local aspect. A large percent- 
age of the children in our primary grades are of foreign parent- 
age. Nearly two-thirds of the children born in town last year 
were of this stock. 

If we are to Americanize them through the schools, it is 
imperative that we admit them reasonably early. By law we are 
compelled to grant them a labor certificate upon completing the 
work of the fourth grade and upon becoming fourteen years of 
age. 

It was therefore decided to admit any child who would be- 
come five years of age on or before Dec. 31, of the current 
school year. Those becoming five after that date will be ad- 
mitted in September of the next year. 

Under this rule we can continue the child in school beyond 
the fourth grade and in many cases — even through the Junior 
High School — before he becomes fourteen years of age. The 
effect of this additional schooling is obvious to all. Were the 
age limit raised to 1 6 years these pupils would constitute a 
most promising contingent of our school population. 

This change however crowded our primaries to their capaci- 
ty, and we were obliged to transfer a member of pupils to 
schools outside of old district boundaries. 



46 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Parents were very considerate; and through some incon- 
veniencies were necessarily imposed, every thing settled down 
pleasantly, and the children are progressing in their work. 

Three of our primaries are working under a handicap. 
The Wainwright, the Dennison and the Payne have two grades 
each in the same room, and it would be impossible, with infer- 
ior teachers, to keep these first grades up to the other first 
grades of the town, 

It is an injustice to teachers and pupils alike; but as matters 
stand I see no practical solution of the problem. We cannot 

take the second grade from the Wainwright and transfer it to 
the Dennison as the distance is too great. Moreover, there 

would be too few in the first grade remaining to constitute a 
school; and again, we cannot send the first grade of the Denni- 
son to the Wainwright as the distance here is too great. The 
same is true of the Payne School I feel that the best possible 
is being done under existing physical conditions, and regret to 
admit that such conditions change but slowly. 



Grading. 

An attempt was made at the beginning of the school year 
in September to inaugurate some method of individual selection 
which would assist materially in improving our system of gra- 
ding. 

Accordingly, a program was adopted by which the recita- 
tion of a given subject came at the same hour throughout the 
first six grades. That is, all the arithmetic came during the first 
period, from 9.00 to 9.40, and so on. 

This enabled a pupil whose general average consigned to 
the fourth grade, to recite with the fifth grade, if he was capable 
of doing fifth grade work in that subject, and there has been 









IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 47 



some gain in this direction. 

While this system had its limitations, it has been very help- 
ful in quite a number of cases. Especially is this true among 
the pupils of foreign birth. These are generally much older 
than the average, have more mature minds, and show a decided 
aptitude for some one subject. Once a pupil is permitted to 
recite with an advanced grade in any subject — arithmetic, let 
us say — he dislikes to go to the lower grade for his reading or 
his language work. In a majority of cases he concentrates his 
attention on the lower grade subjects, and works off his con- 
ditions successively until he becomes a full-fledged member of 
of the upper grade. 

With all its imperfections and inherent weaknesses, it does 
furnish a motive, stimulates ambition, leads the pupil to seek 
the asssistance and co-operation of his teacher. It also enables 
us to hold the pupil in school for a longer time. It also allows 
the pupil to exercise to a limited degree his own selective 
faculities, and shows individual trends and aptitudes which, if 
made a matter of record as they should be, will assist very ma- 
terially in the choice of his life calling later on. 

Still results are not altogether satisfactory. All individual 

differences cannot be reached b5 r this method, and I have very 
serious doubts as to whether any one method will accomplish 
all that we desire. 

Minimum requirements, if made low enough, will insure a 
large percentage of promotions. But will it give full time em- 

ployment to the brighter pupils? With us it has not done this, 
and our losses here have offset all gains in the other direction. 

By combining two or more of these methods, and by en- 
deavoring to supply individual needs by group teaching, we are 
in hopes to secure better results. 

The child that is quick in arithmetic may be slow in geog- 
raphy. With a more rational division of his time between these 



46 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



two subjects, he will be enabled to make a better showing in 
his weaker subject. Of course the class program may be dis- 
turbed. But what of that? Things may be reversed in a year 
or so. Meanwhile the pupil is developing an ability for self- 
help and he will be better fitted for class instruction by the 
changed treatment. 

As I have said before, there is no one all-sufficient method; 
and while class instruction must be our chief reliance, the indi- 
vidual child must have more attention and help, 



Measurements. 

In recent years considerable effort has been made in col- 
lecting and tabulating results of school work in different parts of 
the country with the view of securing some reliable and uniform 
standard by which the work of our schools could be measured. 
This work is not completed as yet, and what has been accom- 
plished is some little way from perfection. 

Under the old method the material for examination was se- 
lected by the teacher on the basis of her individual judgment as 
to the needs of her class. Each teacher did the same. There 
was no uniformity in the material selected, consequently the te- 
sults obtained from such hap-hazard selections had no value 
whatever as a basis of comparison. A rank of 85 per cent, 

given by two teachers in the same grade and subject meant 
nothing, as each was measuring results obtained from differenl 
material and on a basis of different individual judgment. 

This method is still used by most teachers to check up then 
own work, and so long as this is the end aimed at it will serv( 
its purpose. But when we wish, for the sake of comparison, t< 
measure the work of our schools with that of other schools, oi 
all schools in general, we are compelled to adopt some standan 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 49 



method of measuring results obtained from the same uniform 
material upon which the examination is based. The value of 
the work depends wholly upon the rule of uniformity, just as 
much as the inch or the foot upon our yardsticks. Otherwise 
it fails to become an instrument of precision. 

A beginning has been made along these lines, and though 
the tests were made before the mid-year, the results obtained 
were quite satisfactory. To be absolutely fair to our schools 
these tests should be given again and this I propose to do in 
the near future. 

The subjects include spelling, writing, history, geography, 
arithmetic and composition —all found in the first eight grades. 

The scales and scores for the measurement of this work 
have been adopted quite generally, and some startling revela- 
tions may be eKpected. All that remains to be done is to give 
the tests and apply the yardstick to the results obtained. This 
means a deal of hard work; but it is some satisfaction to know 
that our schools are abreast of tho e in Tacoma or Salt Lake 
City. If they are not, we can ascertain the reason and apply 
the remedy. 

Scores for all the high school subjects have no^ been 
worked out as yet, but enough has been accomplished to war- 
rant our making a start. 

We make no claim that this system will be able to cure 
all educational ills. It will not. In fact, the best results of 
teaching cannot be measured. How far the influence of the 
teacher extends in the cultivation of ambition, moral courage, a 
strict regard for th^ rights of others, self-denial and the build- 
ing up of a social consciousness, and the spirit of genuine 
patriotism, can never be measured. If these results are ap- 
preciated, we should be satisfied. 

But there are school activities that may be measured by 



50 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT, 



this method with a degree of scientific accuracy not previously 
attained. And these results the public has a right to know. 
To the teacher and the school official they will be considered 
absolutely essential. 

Upon such a basis, with the personal element largely elim- 
inated, we may hope to build up a system that will become a 
source of enlightenment to all concerned. It will suggest 

better standards, stop waste at its source, and correct faults 
of method and practice. World activities will have a larger 
part in the preparation of courses of study and the world and 
the school brought into a closer relationship. Non-essentials will 
give place to the more useful and practical, and the work of 
the schools made more valuable thereby. 

Lastly, it gives us the means of conducting school enter- 
prises along the lines of a principle enunciated by Prof. Hanus 
of Harvard University: ''A system of clear, adequate, incotest- 
able, and accessible records of the educational results progres- 
sively achieved, for the information of the staff, the board, and 
the public." 



Salaries. 

This a perennial topic and will not down. It is in full ac- 
cord with the trend of prices in other lines and is fully justified 
by economic conditions. Moreover, it admits of little argu- 

ment. An experienced teacher, other things being equal, is 

more valuable than one who lacks this practical training. School 
officials every where recognize this fact, and competition among 
them is keen. If we cannot pay the market price, we lose the 
teacher and the school suffers. 

Nothing so reduces the standard of scholarship nor is more 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 51 



demoralizing to the discipline as the too frequent changing of 
teachers, and we should make ample provision for the retention 
or our best ones. Several of our teachers, especially in the 
High School, came to us last September with little, if with any, 
experience in the work. They are working hard and are mak- 
ing satisfactory progress. They are entitled to an increase in 
salary to a point, at least, equal to that received by the opera- 
tives in our mill, where the cost in time and money in the prep- 
aration for teaching is not taken into the account. 

1 am no advocate of any horizontal, maximum salary 
scheme, where the salary increases automatically with the 
lengthening term of service; that is, where time is the domina- 
ting factor. In fact, I have known of a very few cases where 
the reverse of this policy would be more fully in accord with a 
strict sense of justice, if measured in terms of real teaching pow- 
er. In some cases, too, the maximum of salary and the maxi- 
mum of efficiency meet at one and the same lime; and then, 
after a brief acquaintance, part company forever. 

It sometimes begets that feeling of security that might find 
expression in something after this fashion: "My tenure is safe; 
henceforth I shall not be greatly moved." And then "they rest 
from their labors, and their works do follow them" — to the place 
where all business goes the moment you relax your grip upon 
it. 

Most fortunately such cases, I am in duty bound to say, are 
rare. All good teachers take up educational work during vaca- 
tions or in connection with their regular school work during the 
year. These become better teachers; and are entitled to a salary 
commensurate with their efforts. But the other kind does exist, 
and the weakness of the school work is in direct ratio to the 
number of such to be found in any corps of teachers. 



52 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



This I believe to be all wrong. The baneful effects of such 
a policy is plainly seen in some of our labor organizations 
where the veriest type receives as much as the most skillful 
workman. This is stultifying and destructive, and no real pro- 
gress can be made where such conditions prevail. Let the 
compensation be gauged by the quality and quantity of the 
work, and let these be weighed and measured by the most ex- 
act and scientific means and methods available. 

By this method of selection, supplemented by various 
questionable practices, the richer cities secure the very best tal- 
ent obtainable, and the poorer communities are left to shift for 
themselves as best they may. 

It behooves us therefore to meet this competi ion if our 
schools are to attain to that standard of excellence which we all 
so much desire. 

When a community has the good fortune to have on its 
teaching force, one who loves her work, who conscientiously 
and with singleness of heart strives to carry out the wishes of 
those in authority, and by the rugged strength of her own char- 
acter and influence advances the intellectual, social, and moral 
standards of school and community, that community is wise if 
it retains her at any price. If in these respects she stands 
"head and shoulders" above her associates, let her worth be 
reflected in her salary, no matter whether she holds a position 
in the high school in the grades. 

I wish we might secure such an ideal teacher for some of 
the grades to-day. Her coming would be an inspiration to 
pupils, to teachers and to the community. 

The adoption of such a policy would assist in securing the 
best teachers and stimulate all to better work. 

Judging from your conduct in the past, I feel sure that 
your sense of what is just and right, as well as your pride and 
purpose in maintaining the cherished tradition of our town, 






IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT, 53 



will prompt you to bestow upon all deserving teachers such 
measure of financial support as will enable them to take an hon- 
est pride in their profession and encourage them in their efforts 
for a larger and a better service. 



Supervised Play. 

Our children are not getting the benefit they should receive 
from their recesses. Left to their own devices and free to 
follow the bent of their own inclination, they become . impul- 
sive and rash in their conduct and abusive in their treatment 
of others. The restraining influence and authority of the 
teacher cannot be withdrawn from such pupils for a single 
instant, but must be exerted constantly over them. 

Fortunately this class forms but a small proportion of our 
pupils and this is not the worst phase of the situation. If it 
were, the problem would be simplified and present methods 
of dealing with such cases would be sufficient, 

But there is another class whose improvement calls for a 
very different mode of treatment. These pupils are not seem- 
ingly vicious; they are not boisterous or self-assertive. They 
are quiet on the whole and apparently well-mannered, They 
wander aimlessly about, stand in corners, get together in iso- 
lated groups, and engage in quiet conversation, which experi- 
ence compels us to say is not in all instances of an elevating 
character. 

To those who are viciously inclined the recess furnishes an 
opportunity for meditating evil and planning mischief for both 
in an out of school, It supplements the harmful influence of 
the street, and in too many instances neutralizes and destroys 
all the better influences of the home and the school. It affords 
an opportunity for forming undesirable companionships which 



54 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



may continue long after the school life is ended. In fact most 
of the troubles which the teacher is called upon to deal with 
can be directly traced to this promiscuous mingling of the chil- 
dren at recess time. 

And so we see how a period which might and should be 
devoted to the physical and moral upbuilding of our youth may 
become a real menace to their welfare and defeat the verj' 
purpose for which it was established. 

To change these conditions so that our children may re- 
ceive the full measure of benefit from this period of relaxation, 
we should adopt some of the various forms of organized play, 
in which the teacher herself becomes the leader. 

This will give a complete change, allow the taking or 
some agreeable exercise in the open air, relieve mental strain 
by calling the blood to new centers of energy, develop the child 
symmetrically, and make school life more agreeable and profit- 
able. It will eliminate many of the objectionable features al- 
ready spoken of and permit the work of the school to proceed 
as one continued effort, without the danger of being interrupted 
or overthrown by an incidental feature of the school program. 

Supervised play, then, we consider as one of the best agen- 
cies for promoting the health and happiness of our children. 
Little if any additional expense will be incurred by inaugura- 
ting such a system, and I sincerely hope that with the opening 
of spring we may be able to take up this new line of work, in 
all the grades. 



Physical Training. 

The war has brought to light not a few of our defects and 
weaknesses, and has emphasized the necessity of giving more at- 
tention and effort to the development of our children. The high 






IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 55 



; 



ercentage of rejected men as disclosed by the failure to pass 
the physical examination required for military service, opens 
our eyes to some very important but disagreeable facts. Espec- 
ially is this so in reference to the physical standard of high 
school and college graduates. Those considered as fine specimens 
of physical manhood, and even those of the athletic type or 
class, have been deeply humiliated by the low rating given by 
the medical examiner. 

These tests have revealed another fact, viz: That the pupils 
of city schools, where physical training is included in the course 
of study, far surpass in physical and mental development those 
of the country schools, where such exercises are not made a 
part of the regular school work. 

The State and the National Government recognizing these 
deficiencies in this respect, urgently recommend the adoption 
of some system of physical training which will insure a strong 
and vigorous type of manhood. 

France and England are impoverished and wasted to the 
point of exhaustion by ike ravages of this terrible war. They are 
compelled by sheer necessity to conserve every energy and 
every material resource to the utmost limit of conservation. But 
they fully realize that if, when the war closes, their respective 
nations are to have a place among the nations of the earth, 
their chief reliance must rest upon the fullest possible develop- 
ment of their youth. And this is just what they are doing -giv- 
ing their children the best and most scientific physical training 
obtainable. 

Is their case different from ours? Only in degree; and 

time will make this difference much less than it is today. We 

cannot afford to ignore their example if we wish to make our 
influence felt in the final adjustment of difficulties which the 
war has entailed upon our civilization. 

The School Committee and the School Physician are 



56 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



strongly in favor of adding this work to the list of our activities, 
and I feel sure that in this they have the approval and the sup- 
port of all who take an interest in the welfare of the children. 



School Grounds. 

Through the influence and generosity of several of the 
good women of the town— Mrs. Rice, Mrs. Hayward, Mrs. Bar- 
nard, Mrs. Campbell and others — we have been able from their 
donations of trees and flowering shrubs, to make a beginning 
towards beautifying the grounds of our Central Street school 
plant. A double hedge of barberry plants has been set along 
the entire front; some evergreens along the west driveway, and 
a generous border of flowering shrubs along the line of fence 
on the Winthrop School side. 

Our plans for this year include the repair of the terraces, 
filling the middle plot with different varieties of flowering trees 
and shrubs, completing the border of evergreens, breaking the 
center driveway with a narrow panel or plot of grass set with 
shrubs and flowers, and completing the line of shrubs against 
the Central Fire Station and the Manning Street Lne of fence. 

The larger part of the needed material has been donated 
already, and the work of setting will be begun as soon as the 
spring opens. 

I regret to state that the eastern lawn which was well start- 
ed was nearly ruined by the football and basketball squads. 
But this was not the fault of either team. They had no other 
place to play and they had full permission to practice where 
they did. And right here I wish to commend Mr. Marston and 
Miss Sullivan for their co-operation, as well as the boys and 
girls of both schools for the fine spirit displayed in their care 
and treatment of all the school grounds. 









IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 57 



As soon as the weather permits, the grading of the north- 
ern end of the grounds will be completed. This will give a 
play ground of ample proportions for a practice field, thus 
doing away with the necessity of again using the front lawn for 
such purposes. 

We should have been happy in this connection to acknowl- 
edge our indebtedness to the late Mr. A. S. Garland for his many 
valuable suggestions and for his excellent advice as to plans and 
treatment of our proposed scheme. The perfection to which 

his own garden was developed, placed him at once in the front 
rank of those who are fully competent to advise and entitled 
him to a conspicuous place among those who are deeply inter- 
ested in the attempt to make our town beautiful. In his pas- 
sing the town has met with a distinct loss. 

To Mr. J. A. Huckins, Mr. Ernest Carter and to many others 
our thanks are due for the interest shown and for the care 
and protection given to the newly-set plants. 



School Gardens 

According to the testimony of those most interested and 
also of those best able to judge, our school garden was conduct- 
ed more successfully this year than ever before. 

This was due to several causes. It was the psychological 

season. The desire to plant something, somehow, and some- 

where assumed the form and proportions of a tremendous epi- 
demic, and our whole community was brought under its benefi- 
cent sway. Land that had not been broken before within my 
remembrance, was ploughed and cultivated; and many a house- 
holder to-day rejoices in the fact that his cellar holds a plentiful 
store of fruits and vegetables. 

This is making progress in the right direction— a veritable 



58 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT, 



blessing in a thousand ways. It takes us into the sunshine and 
open air; it relieves the tension of tired nerves; makes us more 
independent; gives us something we can bestow upon our 
friends and neighbors and furnishes the wherewithal, to 
distribute for sweet charity's sake to those less favored than 
ourselves. 

But whatever the cause of this movement, no one can 
deny the fact that a valuable lesson has been taught to our 
American people. The garden plot has come to stay, and 
the lesson it has brought to not a few of our young people will 
strengthen as time goes on. 

Operations for the coming year should be begun much earl- 
ier. As soon as the land can be brought into condition, it 
should be planted to the earlier varieties of vegetables so that 
they may be brought to maturity and another planting begun 
before the summer vacation begins. 

I feel that greater interest could be aroused and maintained 
if work here in the garden and in the school were carried on at 
one and the same time. Children would become accustomed 
to the out-door work before the weather beame too warm, and 
the money derived from the sale of early vegetables would serve 
as an inducement to continue their work through the summer. 

In this connection, I think it would be well to establish a 
few cold-frames in which the vegetables might be started pre- 
paratory to transplanting into the open ground, or to the home 
garden. This would also add to the pupils' knowledge of the 
subject, and possibly point the way to a life work. 

The report of the Misses Sullivan who had charge of this 
work is herewith submitted. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



59 



SCHOOL AND HOME GARDEN REPORT. 

School Gardens. 

48 children started gardens, 26 were quite regular and 16 
ere very nearly perfect in attention. Potatoes and small seeds 
r ere planted June 1. Corn and beans planted June 2. Squash 
and cucumbers were planted June A. Tomato and cabbage 
plants were set out about June 25. Vegetables obtained from 
School Garden. 

White Turnip 315 bunches (5 in a bunch.) 

Tomatoes (ripe) 477 
Tomatoes (green) 5 bushels. 



Cucumbers 


170 


Corn 


40 dftzen. 


Radish 


300 bunches (5 in bunch) more not counted 


Carrot 


260 dozen more not counted. 


Beets 


250 bunches (5 in bunch.) 


Squash 


34 


Beans (string) 


90 qts. 


Beans (dry) 


60 qts. in pods. 


Lettuce 


740 heads more not counted. 


Cabbage 


208 


Potatoes 


24 bush. 



Winter Turnips 220 



Parsnips, not yet gathered, but there will not be many as 
we planted only one row. There were 2 plantings each, of 
beet, radish and turnip. 

K. F. SULLIVAN. 



60 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Home Gardens. 

Home gardens were also included in our scheme of work 
but owing to the fact that many of the children assisted their 
parents in the care of larger plots outside, the results were not 
so satisfactory as with the school garden. 

Nevertheless a good beginning has been made, and a cje- 
cided improvement may be expected the coming year. 

The Misses Sullivan, under whose management both gar- 
dens were placed, make this report: 

The number of Home Gardens visited, 186. 
Of this number 

7 were excellent. 

44 very good. 

24 fair. 

I 3 with parents assistance, were good. 

1 were poor and * 

88 had no gardens worth mentioning. 

this is not a bad showing and is far above the average of 
other places in previous years. Many of the poorer were 

due to lack of good soil and unfavorable location. 

1 he success of these gardens was due in large measure to 
the unflagging interest and untiring efforts of the Misses Kate 
and Nellie Sullivan, who had full charge of the work. Their 
reputation as hard-working, conscientious, and successful teach- 
ers in our schools is too well established to need any further 
commendation. We only hope that both may be spared for 
many years to come and permitted to enjoy that full measure of 
appreciation and regard to which they are so justly entitled. 

We should certainly be remiss in our duty if we failed in 
this connection to make some acknowledgment of our 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 6f 



apreciation of the personal inrerest in our gardens shown by 
Mrs. Walter E. Hayward. A's we understand the matter, it 
was through her influence and energy that the gardens received 
their initial start. That interest and support she has continued 
unabated to the present time, and we wish to congratulate 
her upon the successful issue to which this work has been 
brought. 

We trust that we may still have that same measure of help- 
fulness as in the past. 



Penny Savings. 

The Penny Savings collections which had been allowed to 
lapse for a season were resumed last April and have been 
continued weekly since that time. 

This work has been confined mostly to the first six grades. 
For some reason, unknown to me, there has been very little en- 
thusiasm shown by the pupils of the Junior High School in this 
movement. This may be owing to the fact that many of them 
already have bank-books of their own and attend to their own 
savings account. 

Owing to the lateness of the season, and also to the fact 
that the money and attention of the Senior High School pupils 
were needed in other directions, we did not solicit contribu- 
tions from this school last Spring. With the opening of the 
fall term came the call for subscriptions to the Liberty Bond 
issues, and so, up to date, the High School has not been asked 
for collections at all. This year collections will be made from 
all the schools. 

James J. Hill, the great empire builder of the Northwest, 
had one test by which he decided whether a man would make 
a success in life: "Can he save money? If he can't, he's a 



62 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



failure." This may seem mercenary and sordid; but after all, 
we must admit that it contains a large element of truth, and 
we must remember that Mr. Hill was a man whose judgment 
was sought by the foremost men of his time. We, ourselves, 

know that little can be done without money; and we all real- 
ize — or should do so — the immense possibilities that may 
be locked up in a little ready cash. This is what makes the 

opportunity ours, and gives us the lead in the case. 

We must emphasize more and more the value of training 
to habits of thrift and frugality. Already it has become an in- 
dividual need and a national necessity. With arithmetic, 
history, geography, household art, hygiene, mortality, practical 
thrift should have a place. If it has not, then we are neglecting 
one of the most important branches in our education. Thrift 
is self-respecting and wins respect. It lies midway between 
miserliness and extravagance, and points the way of right living. 
It is a builder of character, and gives impulse to progress and to 
civilization. 

Quite a little has been accomplished along this line already. 
We wish to extend it farther and to make it more general. 

Each class in the Senior High School has purchased a bond 
and is paying for it on the installment plan. 

Miss Sullivan informs me that she has the money in hand to 
make the last payment on the bond purchased by the Junior 
High School. 

In addition to this, I am credibly informed, that sixty four 
of our pupils are bond-holders, and that more have signified 
their intention to become purchasers of War Savings Stamps. 

The following shows the condition of the Penny Savings 
Account: 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 63 



April 1, Balance on hand $147.43 

Collections to February 1 493.09 

$640.52 
Withdrawn _266.9_4 

Balance $373.58 

80 bank books have been taken out for different pupils and 
transferred to books previously outstanding in the names of and 
held by the pupils themselves. 

Suggestions to Parents. 

In my report of last year I endeavored to point out how 
impossible it is to regulate to any satisfactory degree the 
opening and closing of schools during extreme conditions of 
weather by a no-school signal system. 

A single instance of recent occurrence may serve as an 
illustration. 

On this particular morning it snowed but there was hardly 
ny wind and the signal was not given. Remember the whistle 
is blown according to a fixed schedule. At eleven o'clock the 
now had ceased to fall and appearances seemed to indicate 
learing weather. At half-past eleven it began to rain and in 
ess than twenty minutes we had a regular down-pour. I im- 
ediately telephoned for a no-school signal but was informed 
hat it would be impossible to give it as it was after eleven 
'clock, and that such a proceedure would make confusion in 
he Fire Department. 

Everything possible was done to notify the different schools 
o close for the day, but this was only partially successful 
wing to the lack of time. 

Fortunately such occasions are not common; but still it em- 
phasizes the necessity for both parents and teachers to use their 
own best judgement, and to let this govern under such conditions. 



CO 

&0 
< 

c 
a 

co 

* 

o 

CQ 

o 
o 

~£ 

y 

in 

£ < 

(A 

-C 
c 

*-« 

CO 

^— < 
• >— 

a 

3 



c 
o 

• ■« 

4-1 

s 

-Q 

• »■ 

j- 

CO 

Q 



TOTAL. 


^~ j 


CN 


2| 


^r 


2 

00 





O 


00 
vO 


■©. 

00; 


en 

: 


SO 

en j 


CN i 


996 


GO 

1 






- 










eN CN 


! 


"~l l 








— 


en in eN eN 
— CN 


sO 




1 | 

cn 


1 


sO 


0> 1 in — en 


c I 




1 

! 




• 1 


sO i en m cn <j\ 

- 


1 


; 1 : * 


— 


1 

sO GO O 


I 11 

00 ■' O — in 

_ _ 


2 

| 




CO 


«n 


ON GO 


© 

ON 


• 
cn 




CN 

ON 


CN 

1 1 






'<N O 


t^. 


CN — 
— 1 CN 

i 


vO 


: 

0> — 

1 


GO 






^r ■ o 


r^ go] go ; go — 

1 1 






O 




en m 


cn GO — •/& 
CN 1 CN en 


O 

""" 

I. 




in 

O 


* 


«^ CN O ! — 


vO | m 


m 








§ 
- 


GO 


00 


CN 


in sO ! vO 1 — 
^T cn 


I 
i 






O 




00 vO 


CN CM 


! 


00 

ON 


^O 


3 

i 


en 
en 


CN 




r 




r 






vO 

ON 


















en 


GRADE 




= 




> 


> 


> 

1 


> 


> 


X 


1 . 


X 


R 





IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 65 



The foregoing table shows the distribution of pupils by 
grade and age. It cannot, however, be used as the guage or 
measure of retardation and progress. Last September children 
were admitted to school nearly one year earlier than in the 
preceeding year; and, if we allow the first two years in each 
grade to be the age for completing the required work, we 
should have a high percentage of delinquents. This would be 
unfair under present conditions, and I have refrained from 
making any such comparisons. 

The table is complete enough to tell its own story, In the 
second grade it will be seen that we have pupils of 1 2, 13, 1 4, 
1 5, and 1 6 years of age. This is due to the fact that these 
children were foreign born and did not enter our schools uniil 
very late. On the other hand, it will be seen that we have 
quite a few pupils that have come into the higher grades ex- 
ceptionally early. 

A larger interest would be given to the table were the 
names of the pupils given in each case. This would disclose 
the nationality of these children, and we should be surprised 
to see how the foreign born children are forging ahead. It is 
one feature of our school system that gives us the greatest en- 
couragement Progress among this class of children is very 
marked. They are better clothed, better kept, and are con- 
forming to the customs of American children very rapidly. 
Whether our own children would do as well under such ad- 
verse conditions, I very much doubt. The power of the 
school and the power of these homes are unequally matched, 
but the school seems to be winning. 



66 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 

^\\lll!llllllillllllllllllllllll!llllllllll!llllllll!//^ 

I SCHOOLS a PAYING | 

1 Investment for the State ! 1 

= Massachusetts spent $ 1 3,889,838.00 = 

== or $38.55 per pupil on educa- == 

55 tion. 55 

=5 Tennessee spent $1,628,313,00, or 55 

55 $4.68 per pupil on education 2Z 

55 during the same year. S 

22 That year Massachusetts citizens 2j= 

22 produced on the average $144. 5= 

EE each more than did Tennessee ZZ 

2Z citizens, or a total of $403,669, 2S 

22 824.00 more than Tennessee. 55 

as If Massachusetts gives 1 2 mil- jEjj 

■22 lion dollars more to schools, and 2Z 

55 her better educated citizens pro- rji 

=2 duce 403 million dollars more rr 

2S per year, how much profit does 22 

55 this State make on her invest- 5= 

rrr ment in education? = 



= EDUCATION IS NOT A CHARITY, BUT g 

I THE BEST PAYING INVESTMENT | 
%lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll# 

The figures are from "A World-Wide Laiv," by Charles W. Dabney, and 
are for 1899. The figures for 1909 show the same facts. Estimates based on 
the total productions recorded in the 1910 census reports show a per capita 
production for Massachusetts of $466, for Tennessee of $14, and for the United 
States as a whole $332. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 67 



Life is what we make it. Its usefulness and success will be 
enlarged or circumscribed according to the measure of our 
ideals and the preparation given for the acquirement of those 
ideals. 

If our ideals are lofty, but within rational limits; if our prep- 
aration is thorough and practical, then we are entitled to that 
confident expectation that success at last will crown our efforts.! 

If, on the other hand, our ideals are low and unworthy; if 
our preparation is but partial, or wanting altogether; then most 
certainly do we become the creatures of circumstance and must 
forever remain content with whatsoever a fickle fortune may 
dole out to us. 

In the first instance "we are the masters of our fate;" in the 
second we are its slave. 

In the hope that some concrete facts may arouse the inter- 
est of our pupils, or of their parents, 1 have made use of the 
material furnished by Bulletin No. 22 of the Department of the 
Interior of Education entitled "The Money Value of Education" 
— not the greatest value by any means — for the closing pages of 
this report 

Says United Statas Commissioner of Education P. P. Clax- 
ton in his letter of transmittal: "Comparatively few are aware of 
the close relation between education and the production of 
wealth, and probably fewer still understand fully the extent to 
which the wealth and the wealth-producing power of any peo- 
ple depend upon the quantity and quality of education." 

The concrete evidence of the effect of education in in- 
creasing industrial efficiency is overwhelming, whether consid- 
ered from the national standpoint or from that of the individual 
citizen. For example, how else account for the fact that a na- 
tion like Germany, with limited resources, but with excellent 
public schools, has grown in wealth and power so much more 
rapidly than Russia, which has better resources but poor edu- 
cational facilities?'' 



68 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 

^Miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinii^ 

H DISTINGUISHED MEN OF AMERICA §j 

1 AND THEIR EDUCATION. 1 



= With No Schooling EE 

== Of 5 Million, Only 31 Attained Distinction. == 

Er With Elementary Schooling EE 

IE: Of 33 Million, 808 Attained Distinction. == 

ES With High-School Education EE 

== Of 2 Million, 1245 Attained Distinction. == 

~ With College Education EE 

E Ofl Million, 5768 Attained Distinction. ES 

ss npHE child with no schooling == 

— * has one chance in 150,000 ES 

ES of performing distinguished ser- r£| 

SS vice; with elementary education, EE 

EE he has four times the chance; 5E 

EE with High School education, 87 j= 

SS times the chance; with College EE 

EE education, 800 times the chance EE 

1 What Is Your Child's Chance § 

The figures are taken from a study of the distinguished men 

catalogued in IVho's Who In America entitled "Who Are the 

Thousand," by W. W. Smith. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 69 



"In the interpretation of all of the following comparative 
studies of those who have education with those who do not 
have it, let it be understood that the remarkable superiority of 
the educated must not be attributed entirely to their education. 
Those who receive education are a seleeted lot to begin with, 
Their parents were, as a rule, persons of more than average ef- 
ficiency, and hence were able to keep their children in school; 
they were more intelligent than the average, and therefore in- 
duced or required their children to remain in school The 
child himself probably had more than average ability, else he 
would have wearied of the intellectual labor of the school and 
would have left it early. Then, too, the child of educated and 
well-to-do parents has more opportunity offered him to enter lu- 
crative positions. Other influences also doubtless modify the 
result; but after due allowance for all these factors is made 
there remains still a large margin of superior efficiency on 
the part of the educated that one must credit to education or 
do violence to common sense in interpretation of the undispu- 
ted facts." 

Dr. Charles Thwing made a similar study of the 1 5,000 em- 
inent men mentioned in Appleton's Encyclopedia of American 
Biography to find the facts especially with regard to the relation 
between college training and success in political life and in 
amassing wealth. 

He found that there were 277 times as many college-bred 
men who had amassed great wealth as there were of noncollege 
bred men. 

He also found that college men, in proportion to their num- 
bers in the population, had become eminent as Senators, Con- 
gressmen, Supreme Justices, and so on, so many more times 
than noncollege men as to make comparison almost out of the 
question, the actual figures standing not less than 870 to I. 



70 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 

^Mllllllljlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllil//^ 

H Value of Education to s 
= Factory Workers. = 



'— Technical School Graduate ^£ 

K $43,000 s 

S ' Trade School Graduate EE 

= $25,000 S 

SS Shop Apprentice EE 

jj| $15,800 [| 

EE Laborer SEE 






$10,200 

The "Value" of each is consid- 
ered to be the sum which at 5 
per cent, interest would yield an 
income equal to the salary re- 
ceived. 



I Which Will You Be ? j 

%!llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll# 



The figures are from "The Money Value of Technical 
Training," by J. M. Dodge, in the Transactions of the American 
Society of Mechanical Engineers, volume 25, pages 40-48. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 71 



Mr. Dodge says: "A chart thus obtained shows that the la- 
borer starts with $3 a week when he is 16, and rises to $10.20 
by the time he is 2 1 , but he rises no higher. His potential val- 
ue at that wage is $1,200. 

"The apprentice or shop-trained worker starts with the 
same wages as the laborer at 16, but rises more rapidly, and is 
earning by the time he is 24 years old $1 5.80. His potential 
value at that time is $15,800, but he makes no further rise- 

"The trade school graduate, starting at the same point, 
rises still more rapidly, and is earning when he is 25 years of 
age $22 per week, his potential value at this point being $22, 
000. From this point his wages rise less rapidly, reaching pos- 
sibly $25 per week at the age of 32, and representing a poten- 
tial value of $25,000. 

"The graduate of the technical school starts at the same 
point of a weekly salary of $3, and is earning $4 when he en- 
ters college at 18. Upon graduating from college at the age of 
22 he can draw a salary of $1 3 per week. He has then al- 

ready passed the laborer, but is still a little below the shop- 
trained apprentice. He passes the latter, however, during his 
first year of employment, but is still below the trade-school 
graduate, whom he does not overtake until his twenty-fifth year. 
From this point on he rapidly leaves behind the three other 
workers, and at the age of 32 is drawing $43 a week, his poten- 
tial value being $43,000. 

"Thus, four years' training at a technical school .makes a 
man, by the time he is 32, four times as valuable as the laborer, 
approximately three times as valuable as the shop-trained ap- 
prentice, and 72 per cent, more valuable than the trade-school 
graduate — surely a good return for four years spent sn prep- 
aration." 



72 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 

I What Industrial Education Paid 215 Boys 1 






=Em =• 



=W r-W ZZ 






i i ii ii ii 



ii It I 



CM =S 

■X = 



— Age 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 ^ 

ZZ The solid black columns represent the average yearly wage ZZ 

ZZ received by 584 children who left school at 14 years of age. ZZ 

22 The shaded columns represent the average wage received by — 

ZZ 215 boys who remained in Technical Schools till 18 years of age. ZZ 

= Note that the Technical-School Students == 

== surpassed the Shop-Trained Boys from the =E 

= beginning, and at 25 years of age are receiv- == 

S ing $900 per year higher salary. = 

%lllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllillllllllllilllllll!lllllillllllllllllllll# 



The figures were taken from the Report of the Commission 
on Industrial and Technical Education, submitted to the Massa- 
chusetts Legislature in [906. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 73 

^Mlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll//^ 

| Does Education Pay ? j 

55? Salaries In the New York Bridge Dept. E5 

«««• In positions demanding only ~jj= 

S Reading, Writing and Arith- ■— 

zE metic $982. £Ei 

-Ejj m positions demanding High j== 

S School and Commercial Course j^E 

S $1729. =E 

55 I n positions demanding High 5E 

S School and two or three years of 5E 

ss College or Technical Education Ei: 

= $2400. = 



== Which Position Are You = 
m Preparing Yourself 1 

H to Fill? = 

1 It Pays to Continue Your | 
1 Education. 1 

%ii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiia# > 



The figures are from the "Report of the Committee on In- 
centives" in the Report of the Brooklyn Teachers' Association 
for 1909. 



74 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 

^\1]|||||||||IIII1I!IIIIII!II!!!III1!IIII!IIIII1II[% 

H What Four Years In je 
= School Paid. = 



Waeres of Two Groups of 
Brooklyn Citizens: 

Yearly salary of those who left 
school at 1 4 in first column, of 
those who left school at 1 8 in 
second column. 



When 14 yrs. o!d 


$200 





16 


$7^0 





18 


$350 


$500 


20 


$475 


$750 


22 


$5 75 


$1000 


24 


$600 


$1150 


25 


$688 


$1550 


Total sa!. 1 1 vrs. 


5112.50 




Total salary 7 years 


7337.50 



■^ Notice that at 25 years of age the bet- ■— 

SS ter educated boys are receiving $900 per SZZ 

ZSS year more salary, and have already, in 7 IS 

SSI years, received $2250 more than the ^£ 

SSS boys who left school at 14 years have SS 

SS received for 1 1 years work. ZZZ 

H It Pays to Continue Your Studies = 
%llllllllllillllilllllllll!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIl# 

The figures represent the average of actual salaries received 
by two groups of children that left school at 1 4 and 1 8 years of 
of age, respectively, and were investigated by the Committee on 
Incentives of the Brooklyn Teachers' Association, 



SPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 75 

x^MIIIII!lllllllilllllilllllllllllllll!illlJI!IU!ll% 

1 What Nigiit-Sckool jj 

= Graduates Earned 1 



o -I, 



91 



I! II 

Ages 15 20 25 30 35 40 

tmiaimm a^ Mat.; ■riMiuar«i ■■ iviM !■■■» ■ r ■ — g^naB— i— * - * ■ 

22Z Shaded columns represent salaries of 22 

222 all graduates, solid black columns sala- 22 

~— *■ ries of graduates in machine industries. ^ 

2£S The Night-School graduates of Newark 22 

221 before they are 22 years old surpass the 22 

—— ; unskilled workers in salaries, and at 40 r*- 

212 years of age receive twice the salaries 22! 

^"^ paid the average skilled machinists in 22 

- ~" New Jersey. -*— 

%llllllllllHI!lllliillll!!lli:tlllll!!l!llllllilll# 



The figures are from the Report of the New Jersey Com- 
mission on Industrial Education. This school was established 
in 1 884. The salaries of 85 per cent, of the graduates were se- 
cured. Others not secured were thought to be equally good. 



76 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



^Mllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltl//^. 

1 Shall We Equip 1 



OUR 



1 Industrial Army? 1 



"The School, the University, 
the Laboratory and the Work- 
shop are the Battlefield of this 
New Warfare." 

"The weapons which science 
places in the hands of those who 
engage in great rivalries of com- 
merce leave those who are with- 
out them, however brave, as 
badly off as were the Dervishes 
of Omdurman against the Max- 
ims of Lord Kitchener." 



H Shall Our Children Be §| 
| Industrial Dervishes ? 1 

%illllll!llllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllt# 



The first quotation is from Sir Norman Lockyear's "Brain 
Power in History." The second is cited by Sir Norman from a 
speech by Mr. Haldane. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 77 

^\\iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiii!iii!iir% 

| SALARIES PAID | 

■ UNIVERSITY GRADUATES I 



The incomes received from their own work for 
the first ten years after leaving College were reported 
by graduates as follows: 

1st 2d 3d 4th 5th 

Graduates of Year Year Year Year Year 



~ Princeton 1901 $706 $902 $1 199 $1651 $2039 = 

= P.inceton 1906 860 1165 1332 1427 2226 = 

= Yale 1906 740 969 1287 1523 1887 i= 

EE Record for Second Five Years. EE 

H 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th f= 

EE Graduates of Year Year Year Year Year =5 

== Princeton 1901 $2408 $2382 $2709 $3222 $3804 §= 



:== Educated Men Receive Good Salaries: == 

EE Education Pays the Individual. jj= 

EE Educated Men Render Efficient Service: E5 

EE Education Pays the State. EE 

%l!llllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllillilll!ll!lll!ll!lll!llllllilllllllll^ 



The figures are from "The Fifth-Year Record of the Class 
of 1906, Princeton University," pages 245-259. Reports were 
from about two-thirds of the members of the class. 



78 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



^\MIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII(//A 

| THE STATE THAT FAILS I 
I TO EDUCATE I 



"The educated mind is 
the greatest producing 
agency in the world, with- 
out which fertile soil, tim- 
bered land and mineral de- 
posits are so much useless 
material. ,, 

"The State that fails to edu- 
cate dooms its children to in- 
dustrial subjugation by those 
from States that educate. More 
than once have natives lost their 
land from lack of education." 



| Shall We Prepare Our Chil- | 
1 dren to Hold This Land? j 

%iiiil(iiiiililillllilillllllliiillililiilillillil# 



iPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



1% 



Budget for 1918. 






General Expenses $ 35 45. 

Teachers' Salaries 2 78 1 5. 

Textbooks and Supplies 2900, 

Transportation 1 900. 

Janitors' Services 2 1 00. 

Fuel and Lights 5650. 

Buildings and Grounds 2300. 

Furniture and Fixtures 1 40. 

Diplomas and Graduation 1 50. 

Insurance 300. 

Other Expenses 200. 

Total $47000. 

The above amount is gross and is to be reduced by about 
$3500 which the department turns back into the town treasury 
each year. 

The excess of appropriation asked for this year is due to 
the advance in the cost of supplies and fuel, especially in iuej. 
As no coal was to be had, we were obliged to use wood, wiiicn 
is nearly or quite twice as expensive; and this, too, in a winter 
that has rarely or never been equaled in severity. 

The cost of other supplies has steadily advanced during 
the past year and it would seem that the end is not yet. 

The salaries of some of our teachers must be increased if 
we wish to hold our good ones. We cannot afford to let them 
go. 

It will be our endeavor to see that every expenditure is 
made as wisely as possible under existing circumstances. 

But we must have a good working capital in hand If we 
wish to take advantage of special opportunities. 



80 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 




lEaton 
Nutter- 



1895 W 



w//, 



'"'"»,„ 



'"",, 



'""*,. 

'"in,,,, 

Llil|illi,,,„ '""' 



m\\mi 



SS!Sis.-^.>^ 



?> 



J*" 



.. - . ; , 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



81 



A TRIBUTE. 



In the death of Miss Elizabeth Eaton Nutter it is needless to 
say that our schools and community suffered a great loss. 

She was a young woman of exemplary character, ambitious, 
industrious, and helpful in the highest degree. She was well 
equipped for her work and was at the dawn of her usefulness 
when the thread of life was broken. 

Her ideal in life was one of largest-usefulness, and unself- 
ish devotion to the needs of those about her, and she lived it 
with a fidelity that never faltered. 

Few will ever know of her benefactions, or realize what she 
did in a self-sacrificing way for some of her pupils. Many will 
mourn for her and all will miss the sweet, motherly influence 
that dwelt in her presence. 

Though the days of her life were few, and sorrow and 
trouble were not unknown to her, still, she kept her heart and 
labored cheerfully on. 

Measured by the standard of good deeds and loving ser- 
vice, she accomplished infinitely more than many whose span 
of life was twice or thrice that of her own. 

"We live in deeds, not years; 

In heart beats, not in figures on a dial." 

And what more can we ask? What more could we desire? 
A life, brief, but beautiful; completely filled with solid worth, 
with no space left for emptiness; a character above reproach, a 
soul that was spotless. 

We shall miss her, but we will not mourn for her. Her 

light can never be hidden, her influence is with us still. Her 

name is written high on God's great roll of honor, her star has 
a place on His service flag. 



82 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



In closing let me renew my suggestion of the closest co- 
operation between the parents and the schools. Under the 
present arrangement the preparation of lessons is made at the 
homes of our pupils. If parents are not extremely watchful, the 
pupil will not devote the necessary time and attention to his 
work and failure in the class recitation is inevitable. If this is 
allowed to continue, the boy soon loses his ambition, becomes 
less and less concerned about his position in the class, and 
finally leaves school altogether. 

The school is doing everything in its power to notify 
parents of the standing of each boy and girl under its author- 
ity. Report cards are sent home for the inspection and sig- 
nature of the parents. These are supplemented also by per- 
sonal reports issued upon occasions when the pupil is notdoing 
good work; and this is as far as the school can be expected 
to go in the matter. 

If pupils fail of promotion, especially in the higher grades, 
or do not receive a diploma at graduation; then the blame 
must rest where it rightfully belongs. Our deepest sympathy 
goes out to those parents who are thus disappointed, but we 
can go no farther. The standard of the school must be main- 
tained. 

Much of this disappointment and many of these heartaches 
may be avoided, by the close and sympathetic co-operation of 
the parent and teacher and many of our boys and girls be 
given a broader and better view of life. 

Acknowl edging my indebtedness to all those who have 
co-operated with and supported me in the work of the year 
just closed, I respectfully submit this report. 

JOSEPH I. HORTON, 

Superintendent of Schools. 






JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL. 



To the Superintendent of Schools, 

Ipswich, Mass. 
Dear Sir: — 

The work of the junior high school this year is along the 
same general principles as characterizes schools of this type. 
Promotion by subject, whenever possible and departmental 
teaching are being carried out in the four differentiated courses, 
the academic, commercial, household arts, and industrial artsi 

Some notable changes, however, have been made in our 



program. 



2. 
3. 



Introduction of science in all classes. 

Daily instruction in penmanship. 

Commercial forms and business letters taught in 



ill 



classes. 



4. Elimination of Latin in seventh grade. 

5. Uniform program throughout grades. 

6. More stress placed upon drill and mental work. 

7. Class individual method more closely adhered to. 

8. Class exercises in form of entertainments for parents. 
The junior high school teaching force this year is one less 

in number, which necessitates additional work for each teacher. 
This loss has been somewhat compensated by the aid given 



84 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



us by the science and commercial teachers of the Manning High 
School. 

During the second half of last year, science was introduced 
into the eighth grade. This year it seemed best that each 

grade should have the benefit of general elementary science, 
one hour a week. The course in science aims to cover the fol- 
lowing subjects: 

Composition and properties of air and water. 

Compressed air and its uses. 

Effects of heat. 

The weather. 

Nature study. 

Heretofore, writing had no special period on the program 
above the sixth grade. As many of our children are very poor 
writers and none of them very good, penmanship has been 
given a place on the daily program. The commercial teacher 

in the high school supervises the penmanship of each class one- 
half hour weekly. 

Since the introduction of the four courses in the junior high 
school, the commercial class alone received instruction in bus- 
iness forms, etc. This knowledge was thought essential to all. 
Each class now receives one hour's instruction per week in the 
ordinary commercial forms and business letters. 

At the opening of school in September only four pupils 
wished to continue Latin. The elimination of Latin, therefore, 
in the seventh grade was felt justifiable. These four pupils 

were given the privilege of taking Latin with the freshman class 
of the senior high school. 

While the household and manual arts class receives extra 
time along its particular line, the commercial class is getting 
more time in commercial spelling, etc., and the Latin people are 
in class at the high school. Thus it may be seen that the 
differentiation in courses lies in subject content rather than in 
subjects. 






IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 85 



Promotion by subject is made a much easier matter since 
the program throughout the building is now nearly uniform, 
all classes in the same subject reciting at the same time. Thus 
a child may be placed in whatever grade he is best fitted. 

We have been trying this year to make our work less 
superficial and more thorough and accurate, by following the 
advice of our superintendent, given in his last year's report, 
more drill on fundamentals; more emphasis on mental work; 
more work on problems; more emphasis on the teaching of 
principles; and the applicaton of those principles; more re- 
view work and more firmness in holding pupils to their work. 
As an example of this, in each grade of the building, mental 
arithmetic is given fifteen minutes daily. 

Some modifications for a more satisfactory type of in- 
struction are being rigidly tried out in some of the classes. For 
various reasons, as absence, illness, inattention, lack of am- 
bition, etc., we have manv retarded and backward pupils. We 
wish to awaken the capacities of these children to exercise 
their initiative and creative powers and thus make for them 
a happy child and school life. 

As formerly, half of the class period is devoted to super- 
vised study. These backward pupils are grouped by them- 
selves and given individual help while the rest of the class 
study. The teacher works with these individuals, encouraging 
them over difficulties, until they are able to work with other 
members. This must not be interpreted as doing the work 
for the child. The teacher works with him, not for him. We 
are in hopes that systematic, sympathetic individual help will 
enable these children to work and gain power. Once they get 
the spirit of work they will attack difficulties with confidence 
and self reliance. 

The eighth grade gave its initial entertainment to parents 
and friends on the anniversary of the birth of the poet 



86 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



John G. Whittier. It was a Whittier entertainment consisting 
of the reading of compositions written by the pupils, recitations 
from Whittier's poems and singing of some of the hymns writ- 
ten by the poet. It is purposed to have more of these enter- 
tainments in geography and history as well as in literature. 
Teachers and pupils would be pleased to see more parents 
and friends present to encourage the pupils in their efforts. 
It is also our intention to have a school column, occasionally in 
one of our local papers. 

We bring together the best of our classroom compositions 
and recitation work in our Friday afternoon assemblies. In 
this way we try to appropriately celebrate all the legal holidays 
and birthdays of noted people, A visit to some of our Friday 
afternoon assemblies would well repay one, and frequent visits 
of parents to the class recitations would be one of the greatest 
incentives to efficient work by the pupils. 

With the interchange of pupils and teachers of the senior 
and junior high schools the transition of the classes into the 
Manning High should be happily bridged over without any 
waste of effort and a closer relationship thus established be- 
tween the two schools. 

In conclusion let me state that a cheerful, helpful, spirit 
is shown by the pupils of the school. This spirit with the 
faithfulness, perseverance and broad outlook of the teachers 
ought to bring forth good results. 

Opposite will be found the attendance record of the 
Winthrop building. The percentage of absence is much too 
large, This in most cases, is due to illness. 



~3 




O 




o 




X 




o 


06 


(Si 


— . 




o 


cu 


■ — 


O 


•^r 


QC 




X 


H 


CO 
3 


Z 


c 


»—« 


CO 


£ 







4-1 


cT 


rC 


oc 


— 


o 


O 


CJ 


„ 


w 


*~ — 


& 


j« 


UJ 




o 


g 


2 


CD 


< 


4-1 

a 


Q 


CO 


Z 




U3 




^M 




H 




< 







inal 
ank 




U,Q£ 


4-) 


^0"T3 


c 


+■» C « 


<L> 


c CC » 


o 


1) .2 
co >> c 

-3 "3 £ 


J-l 


(U 

CU 






1 -* 




-o S 




<u rt 




go: 








Ed 

co v - / 




as 




l cu 




1 _i<! 




c 




iL «> 
















H 




^ 




1 CU 




1 -* 




1 c 




4-> cd 




CD 




CO 4J 




•5U 




< U 




■ cj 




! CU 



i-4 

CD 

O 

cS 
CD 



— N fO "t m s£l N 00 



mcNmooOiriO^tN 
tN^OOsc^-rj-QOmO 
r^ "t ca ca tt co m in 

in in t< ad 06 00 c> ^ 



^f cq oo *— ■ m <"n r^ ^O 



Csi r>. oo r°ifNiNin 

T <N O^^INN 

oo<-nooooo 






m \0 ^f cc rs rA cn — 



co 



CO 



1) 



- • <u^ 8 

<cn<cO^^O 



Z 



c 

co 

£ 

o 

03 



CO CO CO • CO CO CO ' 

CO CO CO jo to CO CO , • 

1 F^4 • F*» •*«( >>4 » ^ - , — , , ,_, >* 

==* «^=i *^==* *»* ^»« «5«h e*- < t^=i 

*—---. r——\ W ^ — i ^ -—s w^ —* tf^ — < ^^ ~t &~>4 



a 



c 


CU 



Moo 

So 
> ' 





T3 


c 


mm tNK-«t u«. 


to 

H 





rvjao — mcnr^cOaO 


;_, 


cOOgO«n — tNvOt}- 


CD 


•O 


— — 


&fl 


a 




CO 


m 




4J 


°^ 




> 






<f 




rvj — on tj- »n ^ ^"^ 00 


s 




tN nj m in r^> r>> 






— m^Dn^-t^O't 






iTi^-cniANON — 






^' r}-" v£> %D r>^ OD 00 ^ 







CD 
O 

c - 

CD *J 
CO M 



< 



CD U 

^ ni 

<u »n 



< 



D 

CO 



z 

a: 

< 
X 
H 
< 



CD 



s 

-a 

OS 



CJ 

CD 

CD 



DOMESTIC SCIENCE DEPARTMENT. 



To the Superintendent of Schools, 

Dear Sir: — 

The general aim of this department has been to 
keep the needs and requirements of the average American fam- 
ily constantly in view. It may be said to be threefold: First, to 
give the girls some knowledge of food materials; second, to 
teach them to prepare foods in the most nutritious and pala- 
table manner; third, to instruct them in the art of home making 
and housekeeping. 

The- girls are taught about foodstuffs as purchased, with re- 
gard to their origin and preparation for market. Through this 
study the girl is made a more intelligent and economical buyer. 
Owing to the present high prices of all food materials, economy 
is practiced by preparing these dishes that are nutritious and 
may be had for the least expense. The subject of substitutes 

in cookery has been taken up. Their composition has been 

studied, and then they have been used in practical work with 
very good results. 

The study of the preparation of food is very broad. ~ First, 
the reasons for cooking food must be understood, and then the 
various methods of cooking are taught with regard to the com- 
position of the material being cooked, and the! desired result. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 89 



The greater part of the practical work is given to the plainicook- 
ing of substantial classes of food such as are needed by the 
workingman. An effort is made to prevent waste and the use 
of left-overs has its place at this time. The preparation of food 
for the sick certainly is important This is a subject for a great 
amount of study and it cannot be taken up fully. Just enough 
of this work is considered so that the pupil may be instructed 
in the essentials of the preparation and serving of food to the 
sick. 

The actual cooking of certain articles of food that require 
a long time has to be omitted because of the length of the 
periods devoted to cookery. The theory and practice have 
been explained and the pupils are encouraged to try them out 
at home. The cooking of the tender, expensive cuts of meat is 
only explained because of their cost, while the making of stews 
and soups and other means of cooking inexpensive cuts is 
practiced as much as possible. 

General rules are given to the classes whenever it is possible 
so that the pupil may recognize the similarity of the preparation 
of foods all in a certain class. In this way she is able to prepare 
cream of spinach soup at home, even though her practice work 
in class may have been to prepare cream of carrot soup. Com- 
parison of various commercial products has been made from an 
economical standpoint, by the use of different products and the 
comparison of results. 

Instruction in housekeeping is correlated with that of the 
preparation of food. The pupils must acquire habits of neat- 
ness and efficiency while they are practicing cooking and house- 
keeping. Dish-washing, sweeping, cleaning, fire-building and 
in fact the care of all parts of the household equipment are 
taken up in the classes. 

One class from both the seventh and eighth grades have 
special work in this course, and their work can include many 



90 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



things which the shorter courses cannot cover. In the fall a 
a great deal of canning and preserving is done, and the products 
have been placed on sale with the local dealers. In this way 
the pupils gain practical experience in canning and preserving 
which should enable them to take part in this work which is 
being di one in their homes. 

The study of household pests is an interesting and worthy 
subject to be taken up. They are studied in regard to their 
habits, methods of avoiding and destroying them. 

The work in the High School is along the same lines as 
that of the grades, but is somewhat more advanced. The 
dishes prepared are a little more difficult, and menu making is 
studied by arranging and serving simple menus. 

Any girl who takes this course should be able to carry on 
the duties of the home in an orderly and efficient manner, 

ALICE K. LOCK WOOD. 



SEWING DEPARTMENT. 



The work of the sewing classes is planned to give the girls 
a practical understanding of plain sewing and simple garment 
making. Here all the fundamental stitches are learned on a 
practice piece and then applied on some useful article. The 
first article, however, is planned with the idea of the children 
finishing something quickly to encourage them, and it is a rice 
bag. When this is finished satisfactorily they may have their 
choice of making one of the following articles; sewing bag, 
school bag, duster bag and sleeve bib. Every articles which 
is begun must be finished before another one may be started. 
After this article is completed a petticoat or apron may be 
made. 

The pupils of the sixth grade begin garment making and 
they learn to use simple commercial patterns. They may make 
a night-gown, apron, princess slip or kimono. The work here 
is all by hand, the chief problem being to acquire speed and to 
make more perfect stitches than made the year before. Besides 
the manual work, various material suitable for underwear are 
examined, and comparison is made between ready made and 
home made clothing with regard to durability and effectiveness. 
The object of the garment maker's and the designating label 
is explained. 



92 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



In the seventh grade the use of the sewing machine is a 
special problem. Here the pupils learn about the mechanism 
of the machine and how to care for it, as well as how to use it. 
The work of this class is to make the outfit to be worn in the 
cooking class, which consists of apron, cap, towel and holder. 
The long seams are stitched by machine and the greater part of 
the remaining work is done by hand. There is a special class 
in the seventh grade that has more work, and the members of 
it do some extra work, making more underwear, blouses, etc. 
They also make a study of the various textile fibers, and are 
taught to distinguish imitations and adulterations in materials. 

The work of the eighth grade and High School is of a 
somewhat broader scope, and quite a variety is made from un- 
derwear to dresses, waists, middy blouses and smocks. Be- 
sides the articles, made in the prescribed course, special work is 
done at Christmas time, the girls making some useful article to 
give away. In this way the Christmas spirit of giving may be 
encouraged. . 

Repair work and darning has its place in each class; The 
method is learned on practice pieces and then- an article is 
brought from home to be mended or darned. 

A knitting club has been formed which meets on Tuesdays 
after school, Many useful articles have been knitted by the 
girls for the soldiers, including sweaters, socks, mufflers, wash 
cloths and bandages. Squares for an Afghan have been knitted 
and are being crocheted together by different girls in the club. 
Tho yarn for the Afghan was collected by the children who 
asked the townspeople for scraps of yarn; The many different 
colored yarns worked up together have made a bright covering 
for some soldiers hospital cot. The spirit of the children is ex- 
cellent and they enjoy being able to help in the great cause of 
supplying our men with comforts. 

ALICE K, LOCKWOOD. 






MANUAL TRAINING DEPARTMENT. 



To the Superintendent of Schools, 

Ipswich, Mass. 
Dear Sir: — 

In presenting this my seventh annual report of the 
Manual Training Department of the Ipswich schools, I wish to 
call attention to a point that has not hitherto been emphasized 
to great extent, namel}', the use of mechanical drawing. 

We are following the same plan as in previous years, with 
carefully graded models, suited to the needs and capabilities of 
the different classes; but the tool work, or bench work, now is 
preceded in every case by a study of. the model, followed by a 
carefully prepared drawing, After which a blue print is made. 

The relationship between drawing and other manual arts 
in school should be the same that exists between drawing and 
the other arts in the great world of industry outside the school. 

The aim of manual arts in school is educational; outside it 
is commercial. In school the result or product is of little value 
in comparison with the result in increased power in the worker. 

Outside, the important thing is the product, and the worker 
is far foo often left out of consideration, But since education is 
to fit for living, the relationship which exists between the arts 
in school should be such as may be carried over profitably into 



94 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 






after school life. While arranging is an art in itself, it serves as 
a language for transmitting thought with reference to the other 
arts, and it is this power to serve the others that gives it the 
chief place among the manual arts. 

Drawing is more convenient and economical than the other 
arts. The architect studies his design for a house, and corrects 
its defects while it is still on paper. The engineer first experi- 
ments with his machine while he is drawing it, before it takes 
form in expensive iron and steel. 

Thus will be seen the importance of teaching pupils to 
draw with ease and correctness. They must acquire a knowl- 
edge of forms and materials and at the same time a knowledge 
of the technique of drawing. The two are best acquired to- 

gether. Drawing acquired independent of the other manual 
arts lacks point, spirit and quality. 

If then the relationship between drawing and the other 
manual arts should be the same inside and outside the school, 
the practical problem before the teacher of manual training is 
to organize his course of instruction in such a way that he will 
be enabled to give the fullest, broadest, most practical training 
in this graphic language, while keeping its natural relationship 
to the other arts. 

In applying these principles to our own work, we use the 
reproduction method. The pupil examines the model in detail, 
taking the necessary dimensions, then making a complete and 
carefully figured working drawing, and finally making the ob- 
ject from that drawing. 

This plan we are following even with the youngest boys. 
The simplest models are first drawn, then traced and a blue 
print made. 

I think we shall find that this time is well spent, even 
though the output of finished models is not quite so great. 






IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 95 



After all, the boy is the only article to be put upon the 
market 

Respectfully submitted, 

WINFIELD W. LUNT. 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT. 



Mr. Joseph I. Horton, 

Superintendent of Schools, 

Ipswich, Mass. 
My dear Sir: — 

I am sending you, at your request, my report as 
Supervisor of Music in the public schools of Ipswich for the 
past year. 

The course of study throughout the grades is fundamentally 
the same as last year. There has, however, been a slight 
change — for the better— in grade I. In previous years I have 
always started music reading after the child had been in school 
for approximately three months. I was not entirely satisfied 
with the results. It seemed better to wait until the child entered 
Grade II before giving him anything but rote songs, and accord- 
ingly, at the present time, nothing but rote singing is given in 
Grade 1. And I have yet to hear any argument advanced that 
is strong enough to convince me that I should go back to the 
old method of teaching. The results under the present system 
are much more satisfactory and the work is more in accordance 



96 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



with the intellect of a first grade child. Grade I, then, devotes 
its entire year to rote songs; and music reading, scales etc. are 
not presented until the second year. 

From then, until the pupil enters the Junior High, we en- 
deavor to create a love for good music, to cultivate the child 
voice and to teach him the fundamental principles of music 
reading. This requires many years of hard and consistent work 
both for teacher and pupil and I am satisfied that our work in 
the grades is somewhat above the average. Your Supervisor 
visits every grade once each week, which is DOUBLE the 
amount of time given the first four grades by more than 75 per 
cent, of the Supervisors. This fact can be easily verified. I 
wished to bring this to your attention, in order that you might 
know that the lower grades of Ipswich receive more time from 
the Supervisor than is the case in a very great majority of other 
towns and cities. 

And now may I saj' just a few words for our work in the 
Junior High. The two seventh grades are combined for their 
music each day. This is also true of the two eighth grades. A 
half hour lesson is given four days each week. This is very fine 
but FIVE days would be better. Last year, Grade VIII. gave 
the cantata "Indian Summer" assisted by Miss Marion Brown 
and Mrs. Harriet Shaw as soloists with Mrs. Arthur Harold 
Tozer as accompanist. This was a distinct advance in the right 
direction and it is understood by all Junior High pupils that a 
concert is to be given by them each year. 

At the present time, the combined grades are planning to 
have a "Patriotic Concert" which will be given in^the very near 
future. If the townspeople of Ipswich would take simply a 

SLIGHT interest, which does not exist at present, in the music 
of their schools, perhaps some knowledge of what Ipswich chil- 
dren are doing might be obtained. Even at our concert of last 
year, many who should have supported it were very much in 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 97 



evidence by their absence. I sincerely trust that sometime this 
community may realize what music means to the child and to 
support the teachers who are faithfully trying to drive this fact 
home to them. 

Before leaving the grade work, may I suggest that from 
three o'clock until three thirty is no time for a music lesson in 
the public schools. The child has or should have completed a 
hard day's work. Fie enters upon his lesson with anything but 
the proper spirit. It becomes a period of relaxation instead of 
work. Until this is changed, very little progress can be looked 
for in music. 

I am of the opinion that the work in the High School has 
progressed more than ever during the past year. We have a 
new piano, which is due to' the efforts of the Glee Club. We 
have a chorus of over a hundred voices. Also a girl's Glee 
Club of thirly voices. And at the present writing, plans are un- 
der way for the forming of a school orchestra. This is another 
decided advance tor the Ipswich schools, as no town or city of 
importance is without these essentials. But we could go even 
further. Courses in Harmony and Music Appreciation should 
be adopted. Modern and up-to-date High Schools already in- 
clude these subjects in the school curriculum and why not 
Ipswich? May I ask that you give this matter the consideration 
which it deserves? 

Through no fault of the principal, Mr. Marston. our chapel 
exercises are very limited. Until some arrangement can be 
made whereby the Rowley pupils can arrive at the opening of 
schools. 1 am very much afraid that they must remain limited. 
Twenty minutes each morning should be devote 1 to these exer- 
cises but this can not be done under existing conditions. 1 his 
seems to be another matter for serious consideration. 

The combined "chorus" and ''Glee Club" are to give a con- 
cert in the Spring and 1 think that our citizens should assist us 



% IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



in every way possible. It is the first attempt of a public con- 
cert by the High School chorus and it should receive the 
hearty support of everyone, I am sure that a study of the 
above conditions will show that our High School is making 
progress. 

May I state in closing that your Supervisor is one of a com- 
mittee of seven, to arrange for the Eastern Music Supervisors 
Conference to be held in Boston May 8-9- 10-11. A feature of 
the conference is a concert to be given in Jordan Hall, Boston, 
May 8, 1918, to consist of groups of pupils from the various 
high schools in the vicinity of Boston, making a combined cho- 
rus of 400 voices and I am pleased to say that the Ipswich High 
School will be represented by some of its students. Still more 
evidence that music in the Ipswich schools is appreciated by at 
least a few people, though strange to say, they are strangers to 
the Town. 

May 1 thank you and the teachers for the very kind co-op- 
eration which I have received during the past year? 

Respectfully, 
Arthur Harold Tozer, 
Supervisor of Music, 
Ipswich, Mass. 









DRAWING DEPARTMENT. 



Mr. Joseph 1. Horton, 

Superintendent of Schools, 

Ipswich, Mass. 
My dear Sir: — 

1 herewith submit rny report on Drawing. Art 
education in the schools of Ipswich has aimed during the past 
year to produce two distinct results: (1) practical, (2) cultural. 

The purpose of the practical work in drawing is to devel- 
op the pencil habit, the power of drawing freely and fluently, 
those basic forms of practical utility that the majority of people 
find it useful to represent. For this the common tool is the 
pencil. This phase we may call the "common-use" phase. 

This is the day of discovery of the vigor, vitality, and inter- 
est of common things. The field of common needs, the 
needs of the mass of people of ordinary talents and abilities, 
is so clearly marked out, that we can easily select the particular 
object that we are sure the children will need to draw in later 
life. We know perfectly well what they will be, for we know 
that the majority of these children will have homes; that the 
carpenter is a man often consulted by the rural home-maker, 
and when he is consulted by word of mouth and word of 
pencil, the right outcome of the result is doubly assured; 



100 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



that the clothes problem positively demands a pencil for its 
solution; that in the greater part of these homes there will be 
children, and the unfailing demand "draw something for me" 
needs to be answered by one or both of the parents. 

The purpose of the cultural work is to see that every 
child, with or without talents* is taught to recognize the differ- 
ence between refinement and crudity in the ordinary aurround- 
ings of his every day life; the surroundings that contribute to 
his happiness. 

The culture of the average man begins at home and at the 
workshop and office, in the refinement of his furniture, his 
clothes, books, magazines, papers and his garden. The color 
of his house and barn, in their setting of geeen trees, the ar- 
rangement of the shrubs and flowers are matters of intimate 
concern, and provide him with a tremendous amount of pleas- 
ure. His cultural needs are as clearly defined as his needs of 
drawing. They are so apparent that the art teacher's task of 
choosing what objects to teach children to select and arrange is 
already practically done. 

(To return to drawing.) As the purpose of the work is 

utilitarian, every subject has been eliminated from the drawing 
course that does not lead obviously and directly to either the 
use of graphic description in the home for constructive pur- 
poses, or the use of graphic description as an aid in amusing 
the children. 

In selecting the forms to memorize for our graphic vocab- 
ulary, we find that the majority of them are built up on the rec- 
tangle, triangle and circle. 

The house and barn furnishings and their accessories are 
•really made on the type forms and their modifications. For ex- 
ample, the bed, the bookcase, grain bin, and cupboard are all 
modifications of the square prism. If the typical form is mem- 
orized and can be turned in any position without reference to 






IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 101 



the model, that is, if the form is really a part of the pupils own 
mental (furnishings) furniture it is an easy matter for him to 
add the structural details and complete the story. 

Our subjects then have been the large class of constructive 
forms such as the implements in use around the kitchen, 
house, barn, garden, the vehicles, the buildings themselves and 
the furnishings of the building and the people, birds and ani- 
mals. 

While the work in free-hand drawing has been done along 
lines as practical as possible in work of this nature it is in the 
mechanical department that most of our efforts and time have 
been put. 

This year for the first time this phase of drawing has been 
introduced into the elementary grades, beginning with the 
fourth. The success attained in these grades has been even 
greater than we had hoped for. The work has been done as 
part of the course in manual training, the two courses being 
so fitted one to the other as to make possible a practical appli- 
cation of the work in drawing to the subsequent problems in 
manual training. 

The work which, of course, has been confined to the boys 
entirely has resulted in each boy having a definite knowledge 
before he begins work of each model he completes in the shop. 
This work has been of inestimable value to the boy, teaching 
the importance of strict attention to small details and putting 
his work in the shop on a basis farther removed trom the school 
atmosphere and brought more closely to shop conditions than 
ever before. 

Each boy before starting his shop work had to complete 
his working drawing and work from that. In the case of the 

older boys a great many succeeded not only in making the re- 
quired drawing on paper but in transferring these to regulation 
tracing cloth, from which the boys themselves made blue prints. 



102 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



This of course stimulated greater effort on the part of the boys, 
besides lending vastly more interest to the work gave it a shop 
touch which it would be impossible to get in any other way. 

Special attention has been paid in all departments to let- 
tering, as we have considered this to be one of the most import- 
ant phases of this work. In this as in other branches the work 
has been carried out along practical lines. 

It has been the aim of the work in all branches to make the 
problem as practical as possible and to correllate all depart- 
ments with the work in such a way as to make drawing not "a 
thing apart," but a helpful and in fact a necessary part of the 
school life of the child as well as a thorough preparation for the 
problems of his later every day life. 

WILLIAM M. MURPHY. 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL INSPECTION. 



REPORTS OF THE SCHOOL PHYSICIAN 
AND SCHOOL NURSE. 



To the Superintendent of Schools. 

Ipswich, Mass. 
Dear Sir: — 

The school physicians report this year will be brief. 
Its keynote will be conservation, and its essence, facts. Its rec- 
ommendations, which have been carefully considered, will be 
in few words. 

As to conservation: Paper and space cost money. There- 
fore, many interesting details will be omitted. They are in our 
files, however, and anyone who cares to do so may see them. 

Now as to facts: Our system of medical inspection has 
been in operation ten years. For four years its findings have 

been recorded in a card index system which is a permanent 
record on file, of each pupil examined. Much has been done 
to remedy defects shown by these examinations, but much sitll 
remains to be done. What has been accomplished is the result 
of ten years' consecutive work, and the efforts of the- school 



104 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



nurse, who has taken up these matters with the parents, and in- 
duced a material number of them to have the children's teeth 
and throats looked after, as well as many other defects the ex- 
aminations have shown. 1 cannot too strongly emphasize the 
value of the school nurse's work. It is carried on from several 
angles, and the school department knows the reason when a 
child is absent one day. This is through co-operation of the 
nurse with the attendance officer, whereby the nurse visits the 
child's home and the reason for such absence is ascertained and 
checked up in the superintendent's office. The nurse also visits 
the schools regularly, and in addition assists at all physical ex- 
aminations. The nurses report which is appended, will show 
the scope of her work, 

The new equipment provided for the medical inspection 
department includes a first-aid outfit and was installed before 
the beginning of the school year in a room in the new Winthrop 
annex, provided for that purpose. It adds much to the econo- 
my and efficiency with which the work of the physician and 
nurse can be carried on. 

Equipment for the Dental Clinic has been installed at the 
Cable Hospital and I have been informed by a member of the 
dental staff that they will be ready to begin work soon. The 

children are ready, and I assume by the time this report is pub- 
lished the work will be going on. 

To conserve and develop the health of the children I would 
recommend organized play for the small children along lines I 
am prepared to suggest. For the older children, physical train- 
ing through calesthenic exercises, and athletics such as base ball, 
foot ball, basket ball and tennis for those who can take them. 
Athletics I am aware can be taken only by the few, but the 
scheme as a whole would be for the benefit of all. 

I would also recommend that as a part of the instruction in 
hygiene that "Sanitary Squads" be formed in each school to look 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 105 






after their own buildings and grounds and see that they are 
kept clean. Even the youngest children can take part under 
the direction of their teachers and different squads can serve in 
rotation so that all may have a chance. This will develop 
power of observation, order and a sense of responsibility in the 
individual child to an extent that is bound to be beneficial in 
after life. 

The State departments of both Health and Education are 
studying the question of standardizing medical inspection in all 
the schools of the commonwealth, and surveys have been made. 
This is a large question that must be solved in the near future, 
and these war times have emphasized its need. 1 feel that 
what has been done here in constructive work in building up 
our system places us in advance of the average town of our size 
and resources; and we should aim to so develop the work 
here that when the day of standardization comes our demon- 
strated efficiency will place us well towards the top of the list. It 
can be done, and if public sentiment calls for it it will be 
done. 

Respectfullv Submitted, 

G. E. MacARTHUR, M.D. " 

School Physician. 
Ipswich, January 15, 1918. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL NURSE. 



To the Superintendent of Schools. 

Ipswich, Mass, 
Dear Sir: — 

Since the beginning of the present school year ( have de- 
voted more time to the work than in previous years and now 
have it arranged upon a systematic basis. In addition to regu- 
lar visits made to each school, I have followed up cases of 
sickness in the homes and also absence reported by the attend- 
ance. officer and have thus been able to check up the reason 
for every case of absence. I have also assisted the school 
physician in the physical examinations and have tabulated 
the results of these examinations. I have also under the di- 
rection of the school physician sorted out from these lists the 
names of these in need of dental treatment. 

I am much interested in the study and development of this 
work and extend hearty thanks to teachers, pupils and parents 
for their co-operation. Below is a brief summary of the work 
done. 

Visits to schools, 1 92. Every school, every school room 
twice a week. 

Visits to children in their homes, 669. 

Children taken to dentist, 14. 30 visits. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 10/ 



Children taken to hospitals, 4, for tonsils and adenoids, 12. 
Dressings for minor injuries, 5. 

Exclusions from schools: 

Chicken Pox 49. 

Measles 24. 

German Measles 6. 

Whooping Cough 39. 

Pneumonia 8. 

Diphtheria 1 . 

Scarlet Fever i . 

Total 128. 

Respectfully submitted, 

■ MARTHA J. STEWART, 

School Nurse. 
Ipswich, January 15, 1918. 



REPORT OF ATTENDANCE OFFICER. 



To the Superintendent of Schools, 

Ipswich, Mass. 
Dear Sir: — 

The number of absences from the various schools 
has been somewhat greater than usual during the past few- 
months, on account of the prevalence of measles and whooping 
cough which have been quite widespread since the opening of 
the schools in September. The teachers of the different schools 
are required to report to the Attendance Officer each morning 
the names of all absentees and I have endeavored to look up 
all those who are thought to be absent without just cause. 

As these cases are very often distributed to all sections of 
the town, it requires a large amount of time, as on some days 
pupils who are absent are reported from the extreme ends of 
the town, from the lower end of East street to Mile Lane. About 
300 cases have been investigated, the majority of which have 
been kept at home by the parents, but in a number of cases an 
habitual truants. Insufficient clothing, and the need of the child's 
help to do the housework has been the excuse for some of thos< 
who have been reported. Forty-five pupils have been returned 
to school for causes for which they were alone to blame. Two 
cases have been brought before the Court and the parents ii 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



V I 



109 



each case have bee*n fbund guilty of illegally, keeping. the child 
out .of school. <■ ■ 

In addition, the duties of the Attendance Officer require 
him to. aee> that those who are obliged to attend the evening 
school are in attendance each evening and to jssue employment 
certificates and keep the census record up to date at all times. 

I wish to thank the School Nurse for her assistance in look- 
ing up cases of alleged sickness as an excuse for being out of 
school.,^ , ■. *»*■ i ' " ' n " l ^"* 

On the whole 1 think that the number of those who have 
been habitual truants has decreased during the past year. 

George W. Tozer, 

Attendance Officer 



CLASS OF 1917. 



Clifford W. Bolles 
Harold N. Bolles 
Paul R. Goodhue 
W. Mason Riley 
Pauline B. Goodhue 
Elizabeth James 
Ruth F. Joyce 
Dorothy Darling 
Dorothy ,E. Keyes 
Ruth C Peabody 
Sybil K. Meserve 



Harvard University 

U it 

Boston University 

Mr. Holyoke College 
Salem Normal School 



Western Union School of Telegraphy 



IW 



?PSWtCH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Ruth C. Fleming 

Louise Grant 

H. Felton Metcalf 

Olga M. Grey 

Vefma K. Otis 

E. Grace Whittier 

Ella Smith 

Dorothy Caverly 

M . Frances Chapman 

S. Eunice Roper 
Arthur D, Quill 
Stella Goldsmith 
Bernice E. Brooks 
Daniel S. Wendel 
Marian C. Hughes- 
Gladys M. Wiley 
Clifton R. Hodgdon 
Howard R. Gordon 
Emma Holmes 

Number enrolled in High 
85 

38 
10 
18 
24 

3 

2 



Almy, Bigelow & Washburne 

Conservatory of Music 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 



Post Graduate Course 



Post Graduate Course 



School September 11, 1917: 
Commercial Course 
College 
Scientific 
Normal 
General 
Post Graduate 
Special 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 1 1 1 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



We have taken these tables of vital statistics from copies 
furnished us by our Town Clerk, Mr. Charles W. Bamford. In 
every case persons born in any of the British Provinces, Ire- 
land, Scotland or Wales have been excluded. As an indica- 
tion of the drift of our school population theso figures may pos- 
sess some interest. 



Births. 







Foreign 


Foreign 


Year 


Number 


Fathers 


Mothers 


1912 


159 


57 


59 


1913 


146 


62 


62 


1914 


144 


75 


75 


1915 


118 


55 


57 


1916 


168 


99 


100 


1917 


149 


82 


78 



112 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT 



»."* '• . 



SCHOOL CALENDAR FOR 1918, 



T 



erm 



( . Winter 
Spring 
Summer 



Fall 



Begins 



January 2 
March 4 
May 6 
September 10 



CI 



oses 



February 21 
April 26 
June 28 

December 20 



Holidays, 



Every Saturday; Columbus Day, October 12; Wednesday 
Afternoon, Thursday and Friday of Thanksgiving Week; Jan- 
uary 1; February 22; April 19; Memorial Day; June 1 7; and 
Good Fridav. 



No School Signals. 



Two blasts at 7:30 — no schools. 

Two blasts at 8:00 — no school for first six grades. 

Two blasts at 1 1 :00— no afternoon sessions. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



113 



LIST OF TEACHERS, 



John P. Marston, Principal 

Louise M. Marsh 

Mary Weeks" 

Olive Sullivan" 5 

Mary W. Sullivan 

Gwendolin Taggart 

Mildred Emerson 

Amy B. Lindsey 

Elizabeth C. Ferguson 

Herbert W. Pickup 

Katharine F. Sullivan, Principal 

S. Isabelle Arthur 

Leroy W. Jackman 

L. Eva Stearns 

Emma Bell 

Helen M. Anderson 

Lilian M. MacKinnon 

Eva A. Willcomb 

Martina O'Neil 

Alice K. Lockwood 

Winfield W. Lunt 



High School 



Junior High School 



Winthrop School 



(Domestic Science) 
(Manual Training) 



M 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Marian P. Webster 
Hazel P. Weare 
Grace Higgins 
Nellie F. Sullivan 
Carrie L. Bowman 
Marguerite Houlihan 
Lydia S. Harris 
Annie P. Wade 
L. Ardell Kimball 
Winifred M. Fleming 
Elizabeth A. Caldwell 
B. Miriam Bryant 
Ethel W. Archer 
Cora H. Jewett 
Arthur H. Tozer 
William W. Murphy 
Josaph I. Horton 

'Part time in the Junior High School 



Burley School 



Portable School 
Payne School 

4 i II 

Dennison School 

i« M 

Cogswell School 
ii <i 

Wainwright School 

Linebrook School 

Grape Island School 

Music 

Drawing 

Superinten d ent 



APPENDIX. 



Auditor's Report. 



To the Citizens of Ipswich: — 

I submit the Annual Report of 
the Heard and Tread well Funds, as compiled from the books 
of their respective Treasurers. 

I have found receipts for all bills paid. 

1 have examined the various Stocks and Bonds of which 
these various funds are composed, and find them to agree with 
the report submitted. 

ARTHUR H. WALTON, 

Auditor. 
February 4, 1918. 



SPSW1CH SCHOOL REPORT 



117 



HEARD FUND OF IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Income 
Balance on hand January 1 , 1917 
Received from investments 
Received from Treadwell Fund 



$ 352 69 
765 80 
801 72 

1920 2! 



Expenditures 
Salaries 

Insurance and miscellaneous expense 
Balance January 1, 1918 



$1175 53 
400 50 
344 18 

1920 21 



Securities Comprising Heard Fund. 



33 shares B & L. R. preferred stock $5846 00 

35 shares B & M R 1470 00 

10 shares Fitchburg R preferred stock 900 00 

1 C B & O R 3 1 -2 per cent bond 945 00 

1 United Electric & Power bond 950 00 

3 Northern Pac Great Northern 4 per cent bond 2830 00 

1 Aurora Elgin & Chicago bond 1000 00 

3 Quincy Gas & Electric bonds 3000 00 

1 Waterloo Cedar Falls & Northern bond 1000 00 

Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank 2 1 6 64 

18157 64 



na 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



TREADWELL FUND. 



.Receipts 
Cash on hand January 1, f91 7 
Received from investments 

Expenditures 
Salaries 

Miscellaneous expenses 
Paid Heard Fund 
Balance on hand January I, 1918 
I $500 Liberty Bond 



246 


63 


653 


08 


899 


71 


50 


00 


275 


46 


801 


72 


272 


53 


500 00 


899 


71 



Securities Comprising Tread well Fund. 



50 shares Fitchburg R preferred stock 

30 shares Old Colony R 

25 shares B & P R 

25 shares M Central 

25 shares Vt. & Mass. R '* 

25 shares B & A R 



$4500 00 
5215 00 
6300 00 
3080 00 
3460 00 
3990 00 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



1) 



1 County Commanche, Kansas, 6 per cent, bond 

1 City of Fostoria, Ohio, 4 per cent, bond 

1 American Tel. & Tel. Co. 4 per cent, bond 

1 Aurora, Elgin & Chicago R. 5 per cent, bond 

1 Kansas Gas &c Electric 5 per cent, bond 

1 Quincy Gas & Electric Heating 5 per cent, bond 

1 Waterloo, Cedar Falls & Northern bond . 

Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank 

Deposited in Salem Savings Bank 

1 $1000 Missouri Pacific bdg 

! $500 Liberty Bond 



$1000 00 


530 00 


1 000 00 


1000 00 


1000 00 


950 00 


1 000 00 


966 66 


750 00 


1000 00 


500 00 


36.241 66 



120 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



BROWN SCHOOL FUND 



The Trustees of the Brown School Fund present the follow- 
ing report for the year 1917. 

The Funds are as follows: 
Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank: $1377 06 

Deposited in Salem Five Cent Savings Bank I 105 40 

2482 46 



Income since last report. 
Dividend from Ipswich Savings Bank 
Dividend from Salem Five Cent Savings Bank 



54 44 
46 30 



00 74 



Expenditures for the year. 
Transportation of the small children of the Candlewood 
District to and from the schools in the center of 
the town 90 00 



Balance in treasury 

Respectfullly submitted, 

A. STORY BROWN 
CHARLES BROWN 

B. R. HORTON 



10 74 



Trustees 



I certify that I have examined the report of the Treasurer 
of the Brown School Fund and find it correct. 

ARTHUR H. WALTON. Auditor 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 121 



BURLEY EDUCATION FUND. 



The Trustees of the Bailey Education Fund present here- 
with their ninety second Annual Report. 

The Funds in their hands are as follows: 

15 shares common stock B & M R R Co. 360 00 

Deposit in Ipswich Savings Bank 3285 69 

Caldwell Fund in Ipswich Savings Bank 1062 51 

Deposit in Salem Savings Bank 867 70 

Deposit in Salem Five Cent Savings Bank 1893 81 

2 Notes of Town of Ipswich, $700 Each 1400 00 

Liberty Bonds 700 00 

9569 71 
Income during the year 1917 has been as follows: 

From Ipswich Savings Bank 126 52 

From Caldwell Fund 41 24 

From Salem Savings Bank 32 46 

From Salem Five Cent Savings Bank 66 1 

From Town Notes 84 00 



350 32 

Expenditures have been as follows: 
Paid Committee of Minority Stockholders of Boston and Maine 
Rail Road 1 5 00 

Respectfully Submitted Jan. I, 1918 

FRANK T. GOODHUE 
JOHN W. NOURSE 
JOSEPH T. MORTON 
A. STORY BROWN 
GEORGE W. TOZER 

Trustees. 

I certify that I have examined the report of the Treasurer 
of the Burley Education Fund and find it correct, and to agree 
with the report submitted. 

ARTHUR H. WALTON, Auditor. 



122 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT, 



INDEX. 



Organization of School Committee Page 3 

School Expenditures- 
General Expenses 4 
Teachers' Salaries 5 
Text Books and Supplies 7 
Transportation 9 
Janitor Service 10 
Fuel and Light 1 
Buildings and Grounds 10 
Furniture and Furnishings 12 
Rent 1 3 
Diplomas and Graduation Exerciess 13 
Insurance 1 3 
Other Expenses 1 3 

Evening School — 

Teachers' Salaries 1 4 

Janitor Service 1 3 

Other Expenses 1 5 

Report of the School Committee 1 6 

Superintendent's Report 1 8 

Recommendations 35 

Repairs 36 

Age of Admission 45 

Grading 46 

Measurements 47 

Salaries 48 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. & 



Supervised Play Page 53 

Physical Training 54 

School Grounds 56 

School Gardens 57 

School and Home Gardens 59 

Home Gardens 60 

Penny Savings 61 

Suggestions to Parents 63 

Distribution of Pupils 65 

Schools a Paying Investment for the State 66 
Distinguished Men of America and Their 

Education 68 

Value of Education to Factory Workers 70 

What Industrial Education Paid 215 Boys 72 

Does Education Pay 73 

What Four Years In School Paid 74 

What Night School Graduates Earned 75 

Shall We Equip Our Industrial Army 76 

Salaries Paid University Graduates 77 

The State That Fails to Educate 78 

Budget for 1918 79 

Scroll —Elizabeth Eaton Nutter 80 

A Tribute 8 1 

• 

Junior High School 83 

Attendance Record Winthrop School 87 

Domestic Science Department 88 

Sewing Department 9 1 

Manual Training Department 93 

Music Department 95 

Drawing Department 99 

School Physician's Report 1 03 



124 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



School Nurse's Report Page 1 06 

Attendance Officer's Report 1 08 

Class of 1917 109 

Vital Statistics 1 1 1 

School Calendar 1 1 2 

List of Teachers 113 

Auditors Report- 
Heard Fund 1 1 7 
Treadwell Fund 1 1 8 
Brown School Fund 1 19 
Burley School Fund 1 2 1 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
ELEVENTH 

ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

ON THE 

APPROPRIATIONS AND ARTICLES 
IN THE WARRANT 

FOR THE 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

MARCH 3, 1919. 




IPSWICH, MASS.: 
G. A. SCHOFIELD & SON, PRINTERS. 



1910 



FINANCE COMMITTEE REPORT. 



ELEVENTH 

A.N N TJ A^ L, REPORT 



Ipswich, February 25, 1919. 
To the Citizens of the Town of Ipswich:— 

The Finance Committee has carefully considered the financial 
needs for the various departments of the Town as presented to the 
them by the various officers and boards also the articles in the 
Warrant calling for appropriation of money. 

Your attention is called to the financial reports of the depart- 
ments as presented in the Town report which show in detail the 
expenditure's for the year 1918. 

Your attention is also called to the comments on the pages of 
this report following the table of figures in which we give the rea- 
sons which prompted us to recommend different amounts than those 
suggested by the departments. 

It will be noted that in the table of figures on page 3, that no 
figures appear in the first two columns for the water and electric 
departments, while in the last two the figures do appear. 

This does not mean that there is an increase in appropriations 
equal to the amount of the figures. It is due to new laws which 
require appropriations to be made in a new way. 

We recommend the following appropriations for the year 1919: 



FINANCE COMMITTEE REPORT. 





APPROPRIATIONS. 






Department 


Appropriated 


Expended 


Called For 


Recom- 
mended 




1918 


1918 


1919 


1919 


Selectmen 


$2275 00 


$2262 76 


$2275 00 


$2275 00 


Aud. & Accou. 


1450 00 


1449 02 


1500 00 


1500 00 


Treas. and Coll. 


3685 00 


3488 05 


3275 «i0 


3275 00 


Assessors 


&60 00 


842 19 


906 00 


900 00 


Law 


475 00 


474 86 


300 00 


300 00 


Town Clerk 


560 00 


555 74 


550 00 


550 00 


" special 






200 00 


200 00 


Town Hall 


2480 00 


2479 77 


2500 00 


2300 00 


Elec. & Regist. 


579 00 


529 77 


575 00 


550 00 


State Aid 


2685 00 


2684 00 


2500 Or: 


2500 00 


Soldiers' Relief 


1590 00 


1548 23 


1500 00 


1500 00 


Police 


5520 00 


5210 36 


5200 00 


5200 00 


Fire Dept. 


7950 00 


7418 85 


6770 CO 


6470 00 


£ or est Warden 


100 00 


63 75 


100 00 


100 00 


Tree Warden 


400 00 


399 55 


400 00 


400 00 


Park Dept. 


350 85 


348 95 


410 00 


375 00 


Sealer W. & M. 


310 00 


297 49 


210 00 


210 00 


Health Dept. 


8000 00 


7726 04 


4000 00 


3500 00 


Highway Dept. 


20534 64 


19728 21 


21650 00 


19000 00 


Cemeteries 


1800 00 


1788 15 


2136 66 


1800 00 


Out Poor 


8000 00 


7725 53 


8000 00 


7700 00 


Town Farm 


4085 00 


3693 80 


4000 00 


4000 00 


Note Payment 


11100 00 


11100 00 


12200 00 


8650 00 


Interest 


8507 00 


8014 77 


7779 50 


5495 50 


Education 


46754 66 


46313 48 


49000 00 


47000 00 


Electric Light 






10905 00 


10905 00 


Water Dept. 






20995 38 


20995 38 


Unpaid Bills 


655 54 


655 54 


593 41 


593 41 



FINANCE COMMITTEE REPORT. 



TOWN HALL. 

We estimate that the Town Hall will not be used as frequent- 
ly the coming year as in 1918, and have recommended $200. less 
than is asked for which we estimate will be saved in fuel and light. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

We have deducted from the estimate $300. requested to be 
appropriated for water as this amount is paid by the Town in the 
amount expended for hydrants and to be appropriated for the Water 
Department. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

The expenditures for this department outside of $4750.85 for 
the epidemic of influenza were $3005.19 which left an unex- 
pended balance of $494.81 out of the regular appropriation of 
$3500. We consider that the sum of $350C. will be sufficient for 
1919 and have recommended this amount. 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

The expense of the removal of snow and ice in 1918 was 
$2152.50, but this year this item has been so much less that we have 
recommended $19000 or $728.21 less than expended in 1918. 

CEMETERIES. 

The Cemetery Committee have not appeared before your com- 
mittee to show the necessity of an increase over last year's approp- 
riation and we have recommended the same amount as raised last 
year. 

OUT POOR. 

This department finds that owing to the prosperous time it 
was not required to expend its full appropriation in 1918. Believing 
that a similar condition exists we have recommended $7700. instead 
of the amount asked for. 

NOTE PAYMENTS. 

Of the amount required, $3550. note of Electric Light De- 
partment will be paid by the department from its earnings, leaving 
balance of $8650. to be appropriated. 

INTEREST. 

$2284. to be paid by Electric Light Department from its 
earnings, balance to be appropriated. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE REPORT. 5 

EDUCATION. 

The expense of this department has increased so rapidly the 
last ten years that we have given particular attention to the budget 
presented by the committee, and we have after due consideration 
recommended $47000. for the year, believing that this sum is all that 
the Town can afford to spend and that with it the efficiency of our 
schools can be maintained. 

ELECTRIC LIGHT. 

Depreciation $3150., Interest $2284., and Note payment $3550, 
will be paid by the department from its earnings. 

WATER DEPARTMENT. 

$7917. interest, $6000. general expenses, $4843.88 sinking fund 
to be paid from earnings, $2237.51) for hydrant service to be raised 
by taxation. 

UNPAID BILLS. 
We recommend that this amount be paid from the excess and 
deficiency fund. 



THE WARRANT. 

Article 2. Compensation of Town Officers. We recommend 
that the compensation of Town Officers be the same as 1918. 

Article 11. This committee was requested by the Municipal 
Light Commission to investigate the subject matter of this article 
and at the time we were informed by the Manager of the Newbury- 
port Gas & Electric Co. that his company would submit a proposal 
to the Town. Later we received information that such a proposal 
would not be submitted and we appointed a committee to take up 
the matter with the Newbury port Co. and received confirmation of 
the statement that no proposal would be submitted. 

Our committee was informed by the Newburyport manager 
that his company did not wish to supply us with current under the 
terms of the agreement made with the Town when permission was 
given the Newburyport Co. to supply the Ipswich Mills. At that 
time it was agreed that the expense of all of the electrical equip- 



6 FINANCE COMMITTEE: REPORT. 



ment necessary to deliver 2200 volt current to the Town should be 
paid by the Newburyport Co It is now the desire of the Company 
that the Town bear that expense. 

Under these circumstances we do not feel that we have had 
sufficient information to enable us to make any recommendations 
but the following : 

The Finance Committee recommends that a Committee of 
nine be appointed by the Moderator to investigate the question of 
purchasing e^ctrical current. 

That in its report this Committee ascertain and report on all 
of the following points. 

That a printed copy of its report and recommendations be 
mailed to every voter of the Town. For this purpose the Finance 
Committee recommends an appropriation of not more than $200, 
same to be taken from the Excess and Deficiency Fund. 

A. To ascertain the cost per K. W, hour of manufacturing 
current at the Municipal plant for the 5 years preceding 
Jan. 1, 1919. 

B. To ascertain what changes, additions or new equipment 
will be necessary at the Municipal Plant within the next 2 or 
3 years. 

C. To ascertain the cost of changing the present equipment 
at the Municipal Plant so that 3 phase current can be gener- 
ated in place of single phase. 

D. To ascertain what changes in the areials would be neces- 
sary for the transmission of 3 phase current and the cost of 
same. 

E. To ascertain what, if any, new equipment will be neces- 
sary at the Municipal Pumping Plant (Water Department) 
within the next two or three years. 

F. To ascertain the best possible contract the Town can se- 
cure at present for the purchase of electrical current and how 
soon same could go into effect. 

G. To ascertain if there is any other possible source of sup- 
ply besides the Newburyport Company and when same would 
be available. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE REPORT. 



H. To ascertain the total cost of generating- current and 

pumping water by steam at the Municipal Plant for 3 years 
prior to Jan. 1, 1919. 

I. To ascertain the total cost to the Town of buying it s 

current and pumping its water by same, taking- into consid- 
eration whatever station, labcr, etc. is necessary in so doing. 

J. To ascertain what the cost of new equipment at the Mu- 

nicipal Plant will be in case the Town decides to buy its cur- 
rent to be delivered here. 

K. To ascertain the cost of building a sub-station in the cen - 

ter of the Town with whatever equipment will be necessary 
for the receiving and distribution of current from that point. 

L. To ascertain cost of changing aerials so that current can 

be distributed from a sub-station as noted in Art. K. 

M. To ascertain the cost of new equipment at the Municipal 

Pumping Plant so that the water can be pumped by electricity 
and the cost of transmitting current for that purpose from a 
sub-station (as outlined in Art. K.) to the Municipal Pump- 
ing Plant. 

N. To investigate and ascertain on all other points pertinent 

to the subject, 

0. To make whatever recommendations it finds are best for 

the interest of the Town, same to be considered at a future 
Town Meeting, 

We recommend that a sufficient sum be appropriated to en- 
able the committee to make a proper report and to get facts and 
figures from disinterested authorities competent to give them. 

We do not understand that there is any emergency which 
calls for hasty action on this question but we recognize that the 
best authority seems to assume that sooner or later the question of 
purchasing current will come home to us, and we feel that this in- 
vestigation will put us in a position to meet it intelligently. 

Article 14. Reserve Fund. We recommend that the sum of 
$3000. be appropriated for a Reserve Fund and that the amount be 
taken From Excess and Deficiency Fund. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE REPORT. 



Article 15, Observance of Memorial Day. We recommend 
an appropriation of $250. to be expended under the direction of 
Gen. James Appleton Post, G. A. R. 

Article 21. Essex Road construction. We recommend an 
appropriation of $2000. to be expended in accordance with terms 
proposed by the County Commissioners, Feb. 14, 1939. 

Article 23. Extension of electric lighting system to Line- 
brook Parish. We make no recommendation on this article as the 
matter is covered by and subject to the action taken on Article 10 
of the Warrant. 

The Committee extends its thanks to the members of the 
various Boards, and to the Town Accountant for their assistance 
and information in regard to Town business from which we have 
prepared this report. 

CHARLES M. KELLY, Chairman, 

M. CHARLES ARTHUR, 

GEORGE A. SCHOFIELD, 

ALBERT JODREY, 

FREDERICK A. KIMBALL, 

THOMAS R. LORD, 

ROGER S. WARNER, 

CHARLES S. GARRETTE. 

JESSE HARRIS WADE, Secretary. 



1G34 



1Q19 



. 



REPORT 

OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 



OF 



IPSWICH, MASS., 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1918, 

AND THE 

TWO HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-FIFTH YEAR OF THE 
TOWN'S INCORPORATION. 



IPSWICH. MASS.: 
GEORGE A. SCHOFIELD 8c SON. PRINTERS. 

686 



1919 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



TOWN OFFICERS, 1918. 

SELECTMEN. 
Frank W. Kyes, Chairman. 

George E. Hodgkins Eben 13. Moulton 

ASSESSORS. 

John W. Nourse. Chairman. 

Richard R. Glaiser George Fall 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Frank T. Goodhue, Chairman. 

Charles G. Hull, Agent John G. Sperling 

TOWN CLERK. 

Chaeles W. Bamford. 

TREASURER AND COLLECTOR. 
William J. Riley. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Herbert W. Mason, Chairman. 

Howard N. Doughty, Secretary George E. MacArthur 

Joseph W. Ross William J. Riley Luther Wait 

REGISTRARS OF VOTERS. 

Charles H. Glasier, Chairman Charles W. Bamford, Clerk 

Lyman H. Daniels Frank H. Girard 

AUDITOR AND ACCOUNTANT. 
Frederick S. Witham. 

CONSTABLE. 
John F. Dupray 

MUNICIPAL WATER AND LIGHTING COMMISSION. 

Arthur H. Walton, Chairman. 

George H. W. Hayes William H. Rand 

BOARD OF HEALTH. 

George E. MacArthur, Chairman Aaron Lord, Agent 

George W. Smith, Milk Inspector 

PARK COMMISSIONERS. 
Frank T. Goodhue, Chairman James A. Morey Charles H. Wells 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS. 
Edmund J. M. Scahill, Chairman P. E. Clarke Howard Blake 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



SUPT. MOTH SUPPRESSION DEPT. AND TREE WARDEN. 

James A. Morey 

FENCE VIEWERS. 
Warren Boynton Aaron Lord George H. Green 

SURVEYORS OF LUMBER AND MEASURERS OF WOOD. 
Joseph F. Austin William J. Norwood 

BURIAL AGENT. 
Philip E. Clarke 

JANITOR OF TOWN HALL AND KEEPER OF LOCKUP. 

William H. Jewett 

CHIEF OF POLICE. 
John F. Dupray 

TOWN COUNSEL. 

Albert F. Welsh 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 
Joseph A. Huckins 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 
William A. Stone 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS. 
G. Loring Woodbury 

ENGINEERS FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Arthur H. Walton, Chief 

Walter G. Brown, Clerk Edwin M. Poole 

FOREST WARDEN. 
Edward H. Smith 

PUBLIC WEIGHER. 
William H. Jewett 

FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

Charles M. Kelly, Chairman, Jesse H. Wade, Secretary, Thomas R. 

Lord, Albert Jodrey, George A. Schofield, Fred A. Kimball, 

Roger S. Warner. 

MODERATOR. 
Charles E. Goodhue. 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Departmental, 

SELECTMEN. 

SALARIES. 

Paid to 

Frank W Kyes, $200 00 

George E Hodgkins, 125 00 

Eben B Moulton, 104 10 

John A Brown, 20 82 

OTHER EXPENSES. 
Paid to 

Charles E Goodhue, moderator $ 20 00 

J H Lakeman, P M., postage 55 36 

Wright & Potter Co., blanks 1 35 

Hobbs & Warren, blanks 2 61 

Charles G Hull, printing 41 50 

Ipswich Chronicle, printing and advertising 346 15 

Essex Book Bindery, binding reports 63 87 

John F. Dupray, use of auto 75 

New England T & T Co., telephones 257 18 

A Stanley Wonson, wire inspector 161 50 

Robert Miller & Co.. flags 21 88 

H O Whittier, posting warrants 14 00 

G A Barker, Agent, liability insurance 258 92 

Edward Leavitt, killing dog 1 00 

Wm H Jewett, killing dogs 3 00 

C C Boylan, killing dog 1 00 

John F Dupray, dog officer 10 00 

V H Grant, killing dogs 4 00 



$449 92 



6 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

Paid to 
American Ex Co., express 
John F Wippich, care of Town clock 
John E Dodge, ringing bell 
Charles E Poor, distributing reports 
Harold C Poor, 
James H Hull, Jr., 
Henry A Churchill, 
WmHBurnham, 
Horace Ellsworth, 

Jesse H Wade, Secretary of Finance Committee 
C W Whiting, Electric Light report 
Albert F Welsh, services at hearing 
Frederick S Witham, cash paid out 
Reformatory for Women, flags 
A E Martell Co., weigh books 
John F Dupray, posting warrants 
Harry E Rhodes, labor 
James S Robinson, report 
W E Scott, supplies 
Geo E Damon Co., service flag 
W L Augur, labor 
Wm J Riley, cash paid out 
Jacob Smith, killing dog 
J W Goodhue, supplies 
Charles Jewett, labor 
Measures Co., Inc. supplies 
H A Russell, meals 
Dal ton Adding Machine Co., repairs 



Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



Appropriation 



$ 9 29 




25 00 




45 76 




4 85 




4 85 




2 50 




2 50 




5 00 




3 00 




50 00 




241 43 




16 38 




4 00 




9 12 




12 00 




35 00 




15 00 




1 00 




6 75 




24 00 




2 00 




1 50 




1 00 




16 24 




2 00 




90 




4 70 




3 00 







$1,812 84 




$2,262 76 




12 24 




$2,275 00 




$2,275 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



AUDITING AND ACCOUNTING 

SALARIES. 

Paid to 
Arthur H Walton, auditor 
Frederick S Witham, auditor 
Frederick S Witham, accountant 



OTHER EXPENSES. 

Paid to 
Brown-Howland Co., supplies 
Chas G Hull, printing 
H B McArdle, supplies 
American Ribbon & Carbon Co., supplies 
Carter's Ink Co., ink 
Standard Carbon & Ribbon Co., supplies 
Frederick S Witham, cash paid out 



$ 25 00 


125 00 


1200 00 


$30 02 


36 75 


12 00 


9 00 


1 25 


1 00 


9 00 



$1,350 00 



$99 02 



Total expenditures $1,449 02 

Unexpended balance 98 

$1,450 00 
Appropriation $1,450 00 

TREASURER AND CGLLECTOR. 

SALARIES AND WAGES. 

Paid to 
Wm J Riley, Treasurer and Collector 
Grace G Bamford, clerk 
John H Cameron, clerk 
Frederick S Witham, services 



OTHER EXPENSES. 

Paid to 
Hobbs & Warren, blanks 
First National Bank, checks 



$1800 00 

755 00 

151 66 

15 00 


$ 18 57 
23 6Q 



- $2,721 66 



8 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT, 

Paid to 

J H Lakeman, P M„ postage $91 68 

Ipswich Chronicle, printing and advertising 79 80 

Ohas G Hull, printing 16 00 

Wm J Riley, cash paid out 25 40 

H M Meserve & Co., supplies 11 70 * 

• B McArdle, supplies 1 45 

Measures Co., Inc., supplies 40 

Dalton Adding Machine Co,, repairs 3 30 

Bureau of Statistics, note certification 24 00 

G A Barker, Agent, premium on bond 200 00 

Albert F Welsh, services 263 93 

Banker & Tradesman, subscription 5 00 

American Ex Co., express 1 50 

— $ 766 39 



OTHER 
Paid to 
Wakefield Daily Item, blanks 
Wright & Potter Co., blanks 
Franklin N Pratt, blanks 
Auto List Pub Co., blanks 



Total expenditures $3,488 05 

Unexpended balance 196 95 



£3,685 00 
Appropriation $3,685 00 

ASSESSORS. 

SALARIES. 

Paid to 
John W Nourse 
Richard R Glasier 
George Fall, 
Wm B Richards 





$400 00 




150 00 




120 00 




30 00 


EXPENSES. 






$ 8 25 




2 75 




50 




5 00 



$700 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Paid to 
Ipswich Chronicle, printing 
Hobbs & Warren, blanks 
John W Nourse, cash paid out 
Frederick S Witham, cash p^id out 
American Ex Co., express • 
Lilla D Stott, abstracts 



Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



Appropriation 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 

SALARIES. 



Paid to 
Albert F Welsh, Town Counsel 
Geo A Schofield 

OTHER EXPENSES. 

Paid to 
James J Welsh & Co., services 
Albert F Welsh, services 
Frank E Raymond, services 
Agnes M McCarthy, typewriting 
Chas A Metcalf , plan 

Geo A Schofield, services and cash paid out 
John W Nourse, services 



$62 65 




5 90 




12 00 




3 00 




59 




41 55 






$142 19 






$824 19 




17 81 




$860 00 




$860 00 



$74 99 


25 00 


$175 00 


100 00 


10 U0 


15 42 


4 00 


50 45 


20 00 



$99 99 



$374 87 



Total expenditures $474 86 

Unexpended balance 14 



10 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Appropriation 

Appropriation unpaid 1917 bill 

TOWN CLERK. 

SALARIES ■ 

Paid to 
r has W Bamford, Town Clerk 

OTHER EXPENSES 

Paid to 
Hobbs & Warren, blanks 
P B Murphy, blanks 
Ipswich Chronicle, printing 
Chas VV Bamford, recording and indexing 

births, marriages and deaths 
Catingo Georgeopoulos, returning births 
M C McGinley, M. D.. returning births 
American Railway Ex Co.. express 
W X Prescott, supplies 



Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



175 00 



$330 00 



i 13 50 

7 35 
49 75 

123 70 
2 75 

8 25 
29 

15 



$475 00 



$475 



$350 00 



|205 74 

$554 74 

4 26 



Appropriation 

ELECTION AND REGISTRATION. 

SALARIES. 

Paid to 

Chas H Glasier, Registrar $50 00 

Lyman H Daniels, " 50 00 

Frank H Girard. " 50 00 

Chas W Bamford, " 50 00 



$560 
$560 



00 
00 






IPSWICH TOWN REPORT, 



11 



ELECTION OFFICERS, 

Paid to 
Stephen R Harris 

George W Smith 
John R Morris 
Jesse H Wade 
Frank E Howe 
Daniel McKinnon 
Geo A Schofield, Jr 
John H Peatfield 
Frank H Girard 
Joseph Leet 
Geo A Schofield 
Chas V Hills 
Everett G Damon 
John E Norman 
V E Rust 
J F Austin 
A H Walton 
Wm C Wallace 
Lyman H Daniels 
J F Sullivan 
John C Chisholm 
F F Byron 
Chas H Glasier 
Frank W Kyes 
Geo E Hodgkins 
Eben B Moulton 

OTHER EXPENSES. 

Paid to 
Ipswich Chronicle, printing and advertising 
Fred R Hull, printing 
H A Russell, meals 
A C Damon, tables 



$13 50 


13 50 


8 50 


3 00 


8 50 


7 50 


15 00 


12 5<t 


7 50 


4 0G 


6 00 


3 00 


3 00 


3 00 


3 00 


4 50 


9 00 


1 50 


3 00 


3 00 


3 00 


3 00 


3 00 


10 00 


10 00 


10 00 


$83 40 


4 00 


46 00 


7 00 



— $171 56 



12 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Paid to 






W N Prescott, pencils 


$ 10 




C W Bamford, cash paid out 


17 47 






— 


$158 27 


Total expenditures 




$529 77 


Unexpended balance 




49 23 






$579 00 


Appropriation 


$575 00 




Appropriation unpaid 1917 bill 


4 00 


$579 00 






TOWN "HALL. 






SALARIES. 






Paid to 






Alonzo L Brown, janitor 


$240 00 




Wm H Jewett, 


540 00 









$780 00 


OTHER EXPENSES. 






Paid to 






Chas L Lovell, fuel 


$199 32 




Lathrop Brothers, fuel 


168 37 




George Fall, fuel 


237 09 




A H Peatfield, fuel 


219 88 




Electric Light Dept., light 


476 77 




N J Bolles, supplies 


1 90 




United Sweeping Comp. Corp., dustbane 


5 25 




C F Chapman & Son, supplies 


3 85 




Wm H Jewett, laundry 


2 95 




Harold C Poor, laundry 


80 




Middlesex Co. House of Correction, supplies 


5 25 




R W Davis, supplies 


2 30 




Arthur C Damon, supplies 


2 00 




George Hayes, plumbing 


35 70 




A J Brennan, " 


50 21 





IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 13 



Paid to 
John W Goodhue, supplies 
Elmer < ' Smith, painting 
Arthur W Gould, carpentry 
Geo W Hills, painting . 
Mew England T & T Co., telephone 
Alonzo L Brown, laundry 
F G Hall, lock and keys 
Water Dept., water 
Damon & Damon, insurance 
G A Barker, insurance 
American Railway Ex C, express 
Geo B Robbins Disinfectant Co., disinfectant 
T H Perkins, trucking 
Chas G Hull, p.inting 
-T J Merrill, supplies 
Henry Bushek, inspection 
John F Wippich, clock repairs 
W N Prescott, supplies 



Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



$ 51 


14 






5 


00 






54 


00 






4 91 






62 


16 






1 


74 






10 


50 






11 


93 






27 50 






33 


99 

31 






12 


50 






o 


25 






2 


o;; 






2 


50 






2 


c0 






1 


50 






1 


20 








-- 


$1,699 


77 






$2479 77 








23 



$2,480 0(i 



Appropriation $2180 0u 

Transfer from Reserve Fund 300 00 



$2480 00 



14 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Protection of Persons and Property 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

SALARIES AND WAGES. 

Paid to 

John F Dupray, chief $1214 50 

Valorous H Grant, patrolman 1222 17 

Clifford C Boylan, " 1249 60 

Edward Leavitt, " 88 96 

Wm H Jewett, special 118 15 

Herbert Whittier, special 35G 20 

Jacob Smith, special 329 86 

Jesse J Jedry, special 291 16 

Harold C Poor, special 17 63 

George Brockelbank, special 13 88 

Lawrence W Littlefield, special 8 00 

OTHER EXPENSES.. 

Paid to 

Wm H Jewett, lockup keeper $72 00 

Alonzo L Brown, " 32 50 

Harold C Poor, M 28 00 

Herbert O whittier 4 ' " 1 00 

Hannah Wait, matron 2 00 

David A Grady, team hire 35 00 

Mayer & Porter, auto hire 4 00 

John F Dupray, auto hire 10 50 

C F Chapman & Son, supplies 11 45 

Samuel D Dodge, auto hire 1 00 

New England T & T Co., telephone 46 47 

Ipswich Chronicle, printing 8 75 



$4,904 11 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



In 



Paid to 
H A. Russell, meals 
Annie Brockelbank, meals 
T H Perkins, trucking 
John W « oodhue, supplies 
•J H B Lakeman, PM., postage 
M C McGinley, MD.» services 



Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



Appropriation 

Transfer from Excess and Inefficiency ^c 



FIRE DEPARTMENT, 

SALARIES AND WAGES. 

Paid to 
Engineers 

Hose Co. No. 1 & H & L Co. 
Hose Co. No. 2 
Edward H Smith, driver 
Arthur F Burnham, assistant driver 
Fred C Rust, engineer 
Chester Patch, " 
Arthur Brockelbank, labor 
Geo E Hayes 
Eugene Gilbert 
Elwyn Fessenden 
Wm Lord 

John R Morris, janitor 
Robert Spencer, labor 
Arthur Norwood, " 



$ 20 yo 




17 70 




50 




1 48 




6 00 




7 00 




— — _ 


$306 25 




$.\210 36 




309 64 




5,520 00 


$4800 00 




720 00 





5,5j0 00 



$ 320 00 

1036 68 

320 00 

1092 00 

220 50 

25 00 

25 00 

20 no 

26 66 
11 33 
20 00 

6 66 

375 00 

I 00 

1 ro 



16 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Paid to 




Silas Stone, labor 


$ 1 00 


Sundry Persons, still alarms 


21 00 




tpoDi-L. no 


HORSES. 




Paid to 




Highway Department, 


$200 00 


F L Burke & Son 


50 00 




$250 00 


EQUIPMENT AND RKPAIRS 




Paid to 




The Cornelius Callahan Co., hose 


$435 00 


City of Beverly, steamer 


900 00 


J J Merrill, care of fire alarm 


199 92 


Electric Light Dept., labor 


2 50 


Western Union Tel Co., services 


12 50 


Mayer & Porter, supplies 


74 82 


Hammatt street Garage " 


2 75 


C F Chapman & Son 


20 13 


Est. J A Blake 


3 00 


Ipswich Mills 


6 54 


Clarence Cheever. repairs 


1 50 


J J Merrill, supplies 


46 !6 


The Cornelius Callahan Co. supplies 


12 08 


B G Hiller, supplies 


5 55 


John W Goodhue, supplies 


18 55' 


Joseph A King, repairs 


11 55 


N J Bolles, supplies 


2 05 


G C Fiske, 


8 40 


Arthur C Damon, supplies 


9 46 


Canney Lumber Co., " 


7 85 


American Railway Ex. Co., express 


53 


Henry Bushek, inspection 


2 00 


C S Tyler, supplies 


9 00 






IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 17 





Paid to 








Marcorelle Brothers, supplies 


$8 58 






Chester Patch, labor 


10 00 






Ernest E Currier, supplies 


60 


-$1&11 C\9 






«pIOll \)te 




HYDRANT SERVICE. 








Paid to 






Water Department, 


$300 00 










$300 00 




FUEL AND LIGHT. 








Paid to 






Chas L Lovell 


$185 09 






Lathrop Brothers 


101 56 






A H Peatfield 


110 00 






George Fall 


188 84 






John R Morris 


24 00 






Ipswich Gas Light Co 


13 40 






Electric Light Dept. 


130 27 











$753 16 




MAINTENANCE OF BUILDINGS AND 


GROUNDS, 






Paid to 








George Hayes, plumbing 


$ 70 






A J Brennan, " 


130 90 






Arthur W Gould, carpentry 


5 60 






C F Chapman & Son, supplies 


3 40 






W B Richards, teaming 


8 00 






Dustbane Mfg Co., dustbane 


3 00 






Geo B Robbins Disinfectant Co., disinfectant 


13 00 






Arthur C Damon, supplies 


5 18 


$164 78 








PENSION, 








Paid to 








Agnes K Gilmore 


$300 00 





$300 00 



\8 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



OTHER EXPENSES. 






Paid to 






American Railway Ex Co., express 


$ 1 37 




Arthur H Walton, cash paid out 


6 00 




Marcorelle Brothers, supplies 


2 83 




Water Dept., water 


10 00 




Clarence Cheever, repairs 


2 00 




F E Wood, trucking 


10 38 




G A Barker, insurance 


74 00 




Damon & Damon, insurance 


74 00 




H W Phillips, supplies 


6 75 




New England T & T Co., telephone 


129 73 








$317 06 


Total expenditures 


$7418 85 


Unexpended balance 




531 15 




$7,950 00 


Appropriation 




$7,950 00 



FOREST WARDEN. 

FIGHTING FIRES. 

Paid to 
Sundry Persons, labor 

OTHER EXPENSES. 

Paid to 
Mayer & Porter, use of auto 
Everett A Smith, use of auto 



Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



Appropriation 



$54 75 


$54 75 




$6 00 
3 00 


$9 00 




$63 75 
36 25 




$100 00 
$100 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT, 



19 



WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 



SALARIES. 

Paid to 
Wm A Stone, salary 
Wm A Stone, balance 1917 salary 



OTHER EXPENSES, 

Paid to 
J H Lakeman, P M., postage 
Hobbs & Warren, record books 
Ipswich Chronicle, printing- and advertising 
D A Grady, teams 
FE Wood, 

George Tibbetts, teams 
John W Goodhue, supplies 
W & L E Gurley, 



Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



$150 00 




100 00 






$250 00 


$ I 50 




2 87 




5 00 




23 75 




50 




3 50 




20 




10 17 




-? 


$47 49 




$297 49 




12 51 



$310 00 



Appropriation $210 00 

Appropriation, unpaid 1917 bill 100 00 

MOTH DEPARTMENT, 

SALARIES AND WAGES. 

Paid to 

James A Morey, Superintendent $793 24 

Augustus McGinnis, labor 150 75 

Albert Chapman, " 373 46 

John Floyd, " 587 57 



$310 00 



20 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Paid to 
Alvery Marriott, 
Frank McGinnis, 
Libbie J Wood, 
Orrin Leno, 
Cleon Johnson, 
Harry Rutherford, 
Frank T Goodhue, 
Frank T Goodhue, clerk 
Silas Stone, labor 



labor 



$613 53 


135 05 


101 98 


56 25 


18 37 


47 81 


11 50 


6 00 


46 L2 



$2941 63 



OTHER EXPENSES. 

Paid to 
Charles G Hull, printing- 
Samuel Cabot, Inc., supplies 
Dow Chemical Co., 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, lead 
John W Goodhue, supplies 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, tools 
David A Grady, teams 
Libbie J Wood, teams 
James A Morey, use of truck 
Minnie Dort, rent 
F E Wood, trucking and freight 
Ernest E Currier, supplies 
Chas W Bamford administering oaths 
Frederick S Witham, " 4< . 



P 5 00 

14 84 

888 50 

133 20 

1 01 

123 66 

66 50 

114 76 

165 00 

66 00 

16 79 

28 50 

11 25 

1 75 






$1636 76 



Total expenditures, 
Balance 1917 appropriation, 
Private Work— Moth Tax, 
Appropriation, December, 1918, 
Reimbursement from State, 



$4,578 39 



$1632 74 

1978 73 

584 80- 

382 12 



$4,578 39 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



21 



TREE WARDEN. 

SALARIES AND WAGES, 
labor 



Paid to 
James A. Morey, 
John Floyd, 
Alvery Marriott, 
Albert Chapman, 
Frank T Goodhue, 



OTHER EXPENSES. 

Paid to 
A I Savory, supplies 
Geo H Lord, filing saws 
D A Grady, teams 
James A Morey, use of truck 
A J Brennan, supplies 
Minnie Dort, rent 

Commonwealth of Massachuetts, supplies 
Emeline F Farley, damage 



Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



Appropriation 



$72 00 




63 03 




58 90 




46 87 




3 00 






$243 80 




$5 20 




4 10 




9 00 




22 50 




1 80 




6 00 




99 90 




7 25 







$155 75 




$399 55 




45 




$400 00 




$400 00 



22 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Health and Sanitation. 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATION. 

SALARIES. 

Paid to 
George E MacArthur, M D 
George W Smith 
Aaron Lord 

OTHER EXPENSES, 
Paid to 
Measures Co., Inc., supplies 
Chas G Hull, printing 
Ipswich Chronicle, advertising and printing 
New England T & T Co., telephone 
Joseph Martel, garbage collection 
HWNorris, 

American Railway Ex Co., express 
Geo E MacArthur, cash paid out 
T H Perkins, trucking 
Geo E Hodgkins, cash paid out 
John W Goodhue, supplies 
Edward Bodwell, burying cat 



$100 00 


75 00 


75 00 


$ 35 


12 50 


13 95 


34 02 


145 80 


185 37 


5 16 


8 00 


50 


50 


6 40 


1 00 



$250 00 



$413 55 



Total General Administration Expenses $663 55 

QUARANTINE AND CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

Paid to 
Cable Hospital, board and care $102 75 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT, 23 

Paid to 

Salem Contagious Hospital, board and care $177 43 

M C McGinley, M D., services 3 00 

Geo E MacArthur, MD, services 18 50 

A J Brennan, supplies 3 50 

F E Wood, trucking 3 00 

E J MScahill, transportation 20 00 

W N Prescott, supplies 15 58 

B J Conley, " 14 50 



TUBERCULOSIS. 
Paid to 

Lynn Contagious Hospital, board and care $ 3 43 

North Reading Sanatorium, " " " 52 29 

Salem Contagious Hospital, " 15 43 

Geo E MacArthur, M D., services 128 50 

Julia Drapeau, supplies 12 00 

Ernest Drapeau, supplies 14 00 

Tougas & Tougas, supplies 52 48 

Albin Spyut, milk 47 10 

Lathrop Brothers, moving building 16 00 

fuel 2 65 

T H Perkins, trucking 2 50 

Wm Bur ridge, milk 3 84 

Arthur C Damon, supplies 6 04 

John H King, supplies 16 80 

Martha J Stewart, car fare 2 46 



INSPECTION. 
Paid to 

Aaron Lord, agent $525 00 

Geo W Smith, milk inspector 225 00 

E Newton Brown, inspector of animals 43 75 

G Loring Woodbury, " " " 13125 



$358 26 



$375 52 



24 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

Paid to 
E Newton Brown, inspector of slaughtering $161 00 

Samuel D Dodge, use of auto 5 00 

$1091 00 

CHILD WELFARE DEPARTMENT. 

Paid to 
Geo E MacArthur, M D., director 
D A Grady, team 
Geo H Dean, printing 

Goburn Charitable Asso., services Welfare Nurse 
Library Bureau, blanks 
Ipswich Chronicle, printing 



INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC EXPENSES. 

Paid to 
Samuel D Dodge, use of auto 
Edith Spyut, clerical services 
Edward C Brooks, clerical services 
J H Lakeman, P M., postage 
Sundry Persons, nurses' pay roll 
Sundry Persons, cooks' pay roll 
A W Atkinson, fish 
Junius Avery, carpentry 
Wm A Banfill, painting signs 
N Bokron, supplies 
N J Bolles, groceries 
A J Brennan, plumbing 
George Bunce, cook 
Canney Lumber Co., lumber 
B J Conley, supplies 
Ernest E Currier, supplies 
Arthur C Damon, " 
Geo G Dexter, lodging 
H N Doughty, cash paid out 



$125 00 




2 00 




28 25 




350 00 




8 61 




3 00 




$516 86 


i 








$ 54 00 




37 60 




76 02 




2 15 




209 84 




96 00 




10 80 




9 80 




5 00 




4 20 


322 91 




130 17 




6 00 




277 86 




70 75 




32 54 


292 62 




17 50 




12 49 





IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 25 



Paid to 
First Dept. Store Co., supplies 
John W Goodhue, 
John E Greene, carpentry 
George Hayes, plumbing 
Hiller & Co., supplies 
George Hills, carpentry 
Ipswich Chronicle, printing 
Electric Light Dept., labor and supplies 
Water Dept., " " 

Ipswich Hospital Corp., cash paid out for nurses' 

pay roll 
Robt S Kimball, cash paid out 
Lathrop Brothers, fuel and ice 
Chas L Lovell, fuel 
Raymond D Lord, meat 
Manzer & Damon, carpentry 
Marcourelle Brothers, groceries 
Andrews Paper Co., supplies 
American Railway Ex. Co., express 
F W Barry, Beale & Co., supplies 
Brewer & Co., supplies 
John A Brown, fuel 
C F Chapman & Son, supplies 
Dennison Mfg Co., 
Wm C Dunn, 
Eastern Drug Co., 
George Fall, fuel 
Franklin Rubber Co., supplies 
CH Goldthwaite Co., 
Hopkinson & Holden, 
Wm G Horton, 

Kuryur Bostoniski Pub. Co., printing 
Measures Co. Inc., supplies 
Naumkeag Steam Cotton Co., supplies 
The E L Patch Co., supplies 



$ 4 32 


73 23 


15 00 


17 38 


14 57 


8 40 


8 90 


75 60 


31 20 


168 00 


14 35 


53 55 


13 55 


86 56 


58 13 


10 30 


12 50 


1 83 


12 12 


3 75 


22 00 


22 35 


8 75 


1 50 


42 96 


11 60 


2 50 


3 80 


5 80 


30 17 


5 00 


10 76 


379 72 


34 02 



26 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

Paid to 

Geo E MacArthur, M D., services $310 50 

W N Prescott, supplies 1 25 

Walter F Poole, groceries 14 83 

Wm H Rand, plumbing 131 91 

A N Rantoul, supplies 10 20 

F H Richardson, lodging" 4 00 

Salem Launday Co., laundry 8> 83 

A I Savory, supplies 3 65 

Albin Spyut, milk 30 94 

Wm L Stone, carpentry 8 40 

Stone & Forsyth. Co., supplies 19 92 

Racket Bargain Store, 6 68 

FH Thomas Co., " 223 60 

Titcomb & Co., " 88 64 

Tougas & Tougas, " 4 76 

Edmund Wile, trucking 50 ( 

Nathaniel H Wright, carpentry 8 40 

F E Wood, trucking 16 00 

New England T & T Co., telephone 62 80 

Joseph Martel, garbage collection 9 00 

S N Stimson, Mgr., supplies 8 25 

D A Grady, transportation 2 75 

Cable Hospital, board and care 31 00 

Upland Farms, supplies 85 35 

J J Merrill, electrical work 96 51 

Ipswich Mills, supplies 218 00 

C S Tyler, supplies 15 

Agawam Hotel Co., board and lodging 121 30 

Annie R Mehaffey, services 4 00 

Kippin's Market, supplies 2 10 

V H Grant, car fare and expense 91 

E J M Scahill, fumigation 55 00 

Hamilton Hardware Store, supplies 8 40 

Fred W Deering, supplies 15 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 27 



Paid to 

Geo A Schofield, insurance 
A I 'Savory, supplies 



Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



Appropriation 

Transfer from Reserve Fund 

Transfer from Excess and Deficiency % 



45 00 
7 40 


$4720 85 






$7,726 04 
273 96 


$3500 00 
2000 00 
2500 00 


$8,000 00 
$8,000 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT, 



Highway Department. 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATION, 



Paid to 



Joseph A Huckins, superintendent 
Amelia M Clarke, typewriting- 
American Railway Ex. Co., exeress 
Measures Co. Inc., supplies 
Hobbs & Warren, 

Ipswich Post Office, damage to mail box 
Ipswich Chronicle, printing 
Clarence Cheever, repairs 
Geo E Hodgkins, insurance 
Chester Patch, car fares 
Arthur Broekelbank, clock 
Mass. Highway Commission, registration fee 
Chas E Ames, MD., services 



$1466 67 


1 50 


4 72 


7 68 


18 72 


3 05 


5 50 


1 00 


12 75 


1 82 


3 00 


2 00 


12 50 



$1,535 91 



Paid to 
Wilfred Atherley 
Allan W Brown 
Henry H Brown 



STREET REPAIRS, 

LABOR AND TEAMS, 



$ 2 CO 

105 00 

58 49 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT, 29 

Paid to 

A Story Brown $108 48 

Chas G Brown 39 15 

Jesse Brown 5 63 

-Tames Burns * 43 87 

Edward Bodwel! 507 09 

John Blunda 284 40 

Arthur Brockelbank 609 00 

Fred Bodwell 251 52 

Antony Burek 113 80 

John A Brown 36 35 

Chas Bigney 22 40 

Ernest Carter 712 31 

Carl A Caver ly 57 15 

Stanley Cupryna 3 20 

Wm O Conant 899 95 

Thos Cummings 39 76 

W K Chapman 39 68 

Albert Chapman 13 51 

Eugene Chapman 5 26 

Patrick Donlon 1 00 

Walter E Dodge 2 41 

Matthew Daigle 4& 0) 

Barney Dunn 9 00 

Chas G Day 18 90 

E Kingsley Ellsworth 42 50 

Carl Ellsworth 1 00 

Armond Gallant 42 80 

Paul Garrette 667 63 

George Hodgdon 5 25 

Chas Henley 52 20 

Rees Jenkins 454 80 

George Johnston 2 00 

Stanley Kmeich 186 31 

Henry Lavoie 320 43 

A G Lauer 168 38 



30 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

Paid to 

James A Lord 

Orrin Leno 

Forrest Miller 

Irving Manzer 

John McCarthy 

H W Norris 

Chester Patch 

Alex Perry 

James Pappas 

Chas Parsons 

Frank Perkins 

D Sidney Perley 

W L Phillips 

J F Putman 

Lyman Perley 

Arthur Quill 

Thos R Roberts 

Thos H Reedy 

Wm F Ruthhrford 

John Robicheau •* * 

Albert M Sheppard 

Newman Saunders 

James Sheppard 

Chas Saunders 

Henry Smith 

Thomas Szack 

Robt Spencer 

Joseph Stinson 

Henry Somers 

Joseph Shison 

Frank Scahill 

Enos Titus 

Turner Hill Farm 

Harry Wilkinson 



$ 5 50 


10 46 


11 60 


338 93 


24 00 


70 78 


27 50 


3 38 


6 75 


21 63 


181 89 


338 86 


83 70 


23 60 


42 76 


1 38 


203 00 


44 60 


7 45 


3 38 


273 00 -v. 


86 07 -\ 


463 25 


6 75 


52 32 


155 98 


66 80 


152 32 


35 00 


4 40 


251 00 


75 40 


69 19 


266 77 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 31 

Paid to 

Libie J Wood $ 96 26 

F E Wood j 2 70 

Collins York 317 60 



$9803 58 



GRAVEL, SAND, OIL, ETC. 



Paid to 
Michael Ryan 
Canney Lumber Co. 
Irving" Manzer 
Lillian G Stanford 

Essex Trap Rock & Construction Co. 
Chas L Lovell 
The Barrett Co. 
Est George Harris 
Est Eugene Sullivan 
Angle P Brown 
A Story Brown 
James Sheppard 
D S Perley 
Herbert Illsley 
A G Lauer 
N Pappayanopoulos 
Tilton Brothers 
N R Underhill 



EQUIPMENT AND REPAIRS. 

Paid to 

Ernest E Currier, supplies $ 81 79 

Joseph A King, repairs 116 26 

Chas G Spiller, one-half expense on sidewalk 34 05 

Mayer & Porter, supplies 206 93 

Canney Lumber Co., lumber 116 24 

John W Goodhue, supplies 239 25 



$ 10 85 


13 56 


1 75 


16 75 


30 20 


3 90 


1326 81 


2 85 


69 30 


456 75 


5 25 


30 10 


29 50 


5 25 


35 05 


4 00 


52 50 


6 30 



$2100 67 



32 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

Paid to 

C F Chapman & Son, supplies $ 19 46 

R W Davis, ' 6 44 

Robt Spencer, labor 29 87 

J E Greene, " 1 28 

James Graff urn, " 10 00 

A J Barton & Son, labor ■ 1 13 

N E Road Machinery Co., supplies 39 70 

Benj H Davis, supplies - 5 60 

Arthur G Osborne, supplies 26 50 

Ipswich Mills, supplies 16 11 

Harold L Bond Co., supplies 21 44 

Wm A Spiller, repairs 20 20 

Arthur C Damon, supplies 9 75 

J J Merrill, supplies 5 78 

Geo E Daniels repairs 74 00 

Walter F Poole, supplies 60 

A I Savory, supplies 8 80 

Edwin M Poole, repairs 95 

Chas G Hull, carpentry 18 50 

Boston & Maine R R, freight 50 

Samuel C Gordon, labor 18 64 

Geo B ,: -rown, supplies 10 60 

$1139 37 



BUOYS. 

Paid to 

Harold C Poor, care of buoys $ 74 52 

Herbert F Goodhue, care of buoys 100 00 

A I Savory, supplies 155 99 

F O Dewey Co., lanterns 24 50 

Joseph A King, repairs 4 10 

C F Chapman & Son, paint 3 00 

John W Goodhue, supplies 6 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Paid to 
Canney Lumber Co, lumber $15 91 

John A Brown, birches. 4 00 



— $388 02 



FLOATS, 

Paid to 

Edwin M Poole, repairs $31 90 

Canney Lumber Co., lumber 59 57 

Justin E Hull, labor 16 00 

John W Goodhue, supplies 11 71 



SNOW AND ICE. 

Paid to 

Allan W Brown $149 16 

Samuel Buxton 1 38 

George Brown, Jr. 11 31 

Wm Burnham 8 93 

Henry H Brown 61 26 

Chas G Brown 6 00 

A Story Brown 37 90 

Jesse Brown 21 47 

Dennis Bryant 6 52 

James Burns 3 74 

Edward Bodwell 16 50 

Irving Brown 2 57 

Fred Bodwell 16 80 

Antony Burek 5 20 

Ernest Carter 173 56 

Henry A Churchill 25 76 

Philip Copeland 1 53 

Charles Canney 5 50 

Odilon Chouinard 8 25 

Fred G Cross 15 45 

Stephen Caswell 3 09 

Carl A Caverly 4 79 



$119 18 



34 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

Paid to 

Castle Hill Farm $99 32 

Thos Curtin 1 20 

Patrick Donlon 24 71 

Walter E Dodge 29 78 

E Warren Dodge 12 19 

Raymond Dodge 19 90 

Matthew Daigle 5 50 

Frederic Dyrus 1 13 

Fred Darris 1 20 

Walter Ellsworth 9 49 

E Kingsley Ellsworth 12 88 

John Evet 5 50 

Carl Ellsworth 80 

Elwyn Fessenden 168 00 

Chas Farnsworth 8 22 

Nettie Fewkes 24 20 

Bert Goodhue 8 59 

Eugene Gilbert 5 50 

Paul Garrette 21 00 

George Hodgdon 28 84 

Frank E Howe 3 40 

Joseph H Hardy 1 38 

Charles Jewett 73 75 

Rees Jenkins 41 40 

Leander Jewett 8 08 

Ernest Jewett 2 17 

Edward Kent 5 30 

Stanley Kemich 7 20 

Thos R Lord 61 21 

Lathrop Brothers 95 87 

A G Lauer 4 13 

Farley C Lord 6 18 

Matthew Lois 5 50 

Harry Leno 2 38 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 35 






Paid to 

Wm Lord 
Orrin Leno 
Joseph Martel 
John R Morris 
Irving Manzer 
H Mclntire 
Fred McGilvary 
H W Norris 
Chester Patch 
Oscar Pickard 
Harold C Poor 
Joseph Phaneuf, Jr. 
Elliot Peatfield 
Chas E Poor 
Frank Perkins 
Thos R Roberts 
Wm Reedy 
Albert M Sheppard 
Edward Spiller 
Wm Stone 
Edw Smith, Jr, 
Silas Stone 
Bernard Scotton 
Fred Sheppard 
Newman Saunders 
Thos Smith 
John Singer 
Thomas Szack 
Frank Scahill 
Geo Tibbetts 
Enos Titus 
Edmund Wile 
James Wile 
G Loring W 7 oodbury 



$ 1 70 


8 40 


15 79 


4 41 


4 79 


3 26 


10 65 


2 06 


3 03 


51 


11 47 


2 38 


6 01 


2 75 


3 00 


210 00 


3 40 


210 00 


37 89 


7 03 


6 15 


5 50 


1 00 


2 75 


2 72 


10 66 


2 58 


10 40 


28 10 


6 51 


3 75 


3 75 


1 00 


6 71 



36 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Pad to 






Harry Wilkinson 




$21 00 


F E Wood 




3 60 


Collins York 




65 04 


Wm A Spiller 




29 93 




<$£\t>L, LdO 




STABLE . 




Paid to 






Wm G Horton, grain 




$594 79 


Geo B Brown, 




484 56 


John A Brown, 


hay 


196 81 


House of Correction, 


( s 


156 86 


Samuel C Gordon, 


(C 


133 22 


A Story Brown, 


« < 


47 50 


Chas G Day, 


a 


73 18 


Carl A Caver ly, 


a 


66 50 


Irving Brown, 


tt 


24 31 


D S Perley, 


tt 


90 25 


Wm McCarthy, shoeing 




160 25 


Chas S Moore, services 


15 00 


M C McGinley, MD.,' 


i 


5 00 


Water Dept., water 




77 28 


C F Chapman & Son, supplies 


51 77 


B J Conley, 


tt 


2 70 


Est J A Blake, 


<< 


2 00 


W A Snow Iron Works 


( i 


51 00 


A J Brennan, 


tt 


6 85 


Geo W Hills, painting 




6 20 


A I Savory, supplies 


1 80 


Arthur C Damon, " 


OTHER EXPENSES. 


4 50 
$2254 13 


Paid to 






Boston & Maine R R., freight 


$ 1 93 


Hammatt Street Garage, storage 


21 00 






IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 37 



Paid to 








Water Dept., fountains 




$80 W 




Traffic Sign & Signal Co., 


signs 


54 00 




Geo E Hodgkins, insurance 


72 00 




J J Merrill, supplies 




1 55 




Peoples Ex. Co., express 




1 12 




Patrick Donlon, mulch 




3 50 








— 


$235 10 


Total expenditures 




$19,728 21 


Unexpended balance 






806 43 






$20,534 64 


Appropriation 




$20300 00 




Appropriation unpaid 1917 bills 


234 64 








-$20,534 64 



ESSEX ROAD CONSTRUCTION. 

LABOR AND TEAMS. 

Paid to 

A Story Brown $1040 85 

Fred Bodwell !68 63 

Antony Burek 271 84 

Matthew Daigle 170 13 

Ernest Dort 116 45 

Armond Gallant 227 06 

PaulGarrette 21 56 

Alphonso Gallant 22 13 

Walter Girard 134 63 

Chas Henley 705 60 

Rees Jenkins 120 15 

George Johnston 55 20 

Stanley Kmeich 296 17 

Louis Kelly 6 00 



3& 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Paid to 

Henry Lavoie 
Lathrop Brothers 
A G Lauer 
Isaac Lemieux 
John Minnihan 
Chester Patch 
Alex Perry 
J F Putman 
Thos H Reedy 
John Robicheau 
Chas Saunders 
Henry Smith 
Thomas Szack 
Henry Somers 
John H Sutton 
Frank Scahill 
Enos Titus 
Edmund Wile 
Harry Wilkinson 
Felix Wegzyn 
Collins York 
Geo W Hills 



$ 12 38 


8 


10 


73 


20 


62 07 


56 63 


480 25 


37 


14 


43 


80 


10 


80 


53 26 


22 


89 


251 


26 


350 69 


27 


57 


33 


13 


93 


60 


55 89 


815 


85 


368 42 


406 


80 


47 


20 


17 


00 



$6584 33 



OTHER EXPENSES. 



Paid to 

A Story Brown, gravel 
John W Goodhue, supplies 
Barbour, Stockwell Co,, supplies 
Canney Lumber Co., lumber 
Walter F Poole, supplies 
Chas L Lovell, 
Ipswich Mills, coal. 



$ 99 00 

233 57 

51 00 

242 91 

6 75 

17 85 

21 85 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 39 



Paid to 
Standard Oil Co., oil 



Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



Balance from 1917 
Reimbursement from County and 
Mass. Highway Commission 



CENTRAL STREET MACADAM. 

Paid to 
The Barrett Co., tarvia $53 49 
Total expenditures $53 49 

Balance from 1917 $53 49 



144 00 


$816 93 




$7,401 26 
15 91 


$2213 33 
5203 84 


$7,417 17 
$7,417 17 



40 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Charities. 

OUT POOR DEPARTMENT, 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATION. 

Paid to 
Frank T Goodhue, salary 
John G Sperling, 
Chas G Hull, 

New England T & T Co., telephone 
Chas G Hull, printing 
E E Currier, use of auto 
D A Grady, use of auto 
Boston & Maine R R., mileage book 
Albert F Welsh, services 
Chas G Hull, agent 
Justin E Hull, boat hire 
Mass. Asso. Relief Officers, membership fee 
Chas G Hull, cash paid out 



CASH ALLOWANCES. 

Paid to 
Various Persons, Cash $2623 40 



$100 00 


75 00 


75 00 


105 09 


20 00 


8 00 


1 75 


12 15 


10 00 


200 00 


2 00 


4 50 


13 97 



$627 46 



$ 2623 40 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT, 



41 



KENT, 
Paid to 

iDaniel O'Brien 

v\ alter F Gould 

Elizabeth Harrigan 

Geo A Daniels 

I E B Perkins 

GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 
Paid to 
Walter F Poole 
Wm P Reilly 
E E Gray Co, 
L E Willcomb 
Chas Canelos 
Tougas & Tougas 
Marcorelle Brothers 
O B Kippin 
A G Pechilis 
Zervas Brothers 
M M Wizbicki 

FUEL, 
Paid to 
Lathrop Brothers 
Chas L Lovell 
A H Peatfield 

BOARD AND CARE, 

Paid to 
Nora Moynahan 
Mrs A M Sheppard 
Mamie E Kneeland 
Ella Hathaway 
Ipswich Chapter, Red Cross 



$30 00 
36 00 
18 00 

12 50 

13 00 



$ 73 53 

187 04 

60 65 

101 98 

116 61 

12 00 

12 25 

3 00 

8 00 

9 36 
23 57 



$83 70 
81 98 
17 63 



$300 00 


4 


00 


78 


00 


48 


00 


75 


00 



$109 50 



$607 m 



$183 31 



$505 00 



42 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



MEDICINE AND MEDICAL ATTENDANCE. 



Paid to 
B J Gonley 
Est J A Blake 
Brown Drug Co, 
A I Savory 
W N Prescott 
M C McGinley, M D, 
G G Bailey, M D. 
Ipswich Chapter, Red Cross 
Maude Jewett 



$ 74 32 


27 55 


111 10 


8 25 


6 45 


249 74 


28 00 


15 00 


206 00 



$726 41 



Paid to 
Ralph K Whittier 
Chas H Kerans 



BURIALS, 



> 4 00 
50 00 



$54 00 



Paid to 
Cable Hospital 
Beverly Hospital 
Salem Hospital 



INSTITUTIONS, 



V 



$223 75 

7 00 

38 00 



$268 75 



OTHER CITIES AND TOWNS. 



Paid to 
City of Beverly 
City of Lynn 
City of Chicopee 
City of Lawrence 
Town of Wenham 
Town of West Newbury 



$ 91 35 


101 00 


9 00 


21 93 


104 00 


22 CO 



$349 28 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 43 



MOTHERS' aid. 






Paid to 






Various Persons, local cases 


$927 00 




Town of West Newbury 


305 00 




Town of Rowley 


299 33 




Town of Danvers 


24 00 






_ 


$1555 3-3 


OTHER EXPENSES. 






Paid to 






C S Tyler, supplies 


$12 30 




E Bokron, 


11 00 




Christos Gianakos, supplies 


8 00 




T H Perkins, trucking 


1 00 




Antony Gianakos, supplies 


9 00 




Alice Grant, " 


5 00 




S D Dodge, use of auto 


8 00 




Boston & Maine R R», car fares 


•57 80 








$113 10 


Total expenditures 


$7,723 53 


Unexpended balance 




276 47 






$8,000 00 


Appropriation 




$8,000 00 



Receipts to the credit of this department for the year have 
been as follows : 

Comm. of Massachusetts, Mothers Aid cases $320 6? 

Reimbursenents from individuals 334 20 

$654 87 



Accounts due and unpaid : 
Comm. of Massachusetts, Temporary Aid cases $424 56 

Mothers' aid cases 286 00 



$710 56 



U IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

Total credits $1365 AZ 

Expended, 1918 7723 53 

Net expense 6358 10 

During the.year the following old accounts have been paid : 
Comm, of Massachusetts, support of 

sick pauper $ 12 00 

Comm. of Massachusetts, burial of pauper 10 0* > 

Temporary Aid cases 264 60 
" " Mothers' Aid cases 345 67 

$632 27 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



45 



Town 


Farm 


D 


epartment. 






SALARIES * 


\NE 


► WAGES. 




Paid to 










Edgar I Holland, superintendent 




$600 00 




Margaret A Holland, 


matron 




200 00 




Mary MacPherson, labor 




122 50 




Hazel Grant, 






75 00 




Chas L Henley, 






45 00 




Joseph Day, 






12 50 




George Burbidge, 






142 50 




C Farnsworth, 






20 00 




V E Rust, Jr. 






66 25 


$1288 75 


GRO 


PROVISIONS. 




Paid to 










E E Gray Co. 






$ 99 78 




James Averoff 






46 00 




Titcomb & Co. 






17 89 




< i Amazeen & Co. 






21 48 




Est J A Blake 






2 62 




Grand Union Tea Co. 






19 00 




Marcorelle Brothers 






164 83 




Tougas & Tougas 






268 88 




Chas Canelos 






65 08 




Kippin's Market 






18 09 




N J Bolles 






17 31 




L E Willcomb 






25 67 




J J Ciolek 






31 55 




Edward Wells 






21 50 




Walter F Gould 






2 00 




Walter F Poole 






46 93 




W E Scott 






43 59 




Ipswich Conservation Committee 




5 00 




Geo E Marsh Co. 






8 25 




James G Paganis 






5 05 


«QQH ^f\ 



46 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



DRY GOODS AND CLOTHING. 




Paid to 




First Dept, Store Co. 


$31 49 


Louis H Bixby 


22 90 


Hiller & Co. 


64 41 


C S Tyler 


11 10 


S H Thurston 


2 00 

«?iqi Of) 




<p_Lo± u\J 


FUEL AND LIGHT, 




Paid to 




Chas L Lovell 


$35 57 


A H Peatfield 


11 92 


George Fall 


19 26 


Lathrop Brothers 


45 04 


Standard Oil Co. 


12 00 




$123 79 


EQUIPMENT AND REPAIRS. 




Paid to 




Canney Lumber Co., lumber 


$76 33 


Chas G Hull, carpentry 


93 00 


Frank T Goodhue, carpentry 


3 50 


John W Goodhue, supplies 


90 45 


Chas L Lovell, 


4 25 


A I Savory, 


26 07 


E E Gurrier, 


24 81 


George Hayes, plumbing 


16 94 


Racket Bargain Store, supplies 


23 54 


C F Chapman & Son, 


12 35 


Arthur C Damon, 


42 31 


A J Brennan, plumbing 


36 96 


Joseph A King, repairs 


19 09 


Waverly Heating & Supply Co., supplies 


4 67 


Chase Brothers Co., trees 


30 00 


J A Farley Co., seed 


22 35 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 47 

Mayer & Porter, supplies 38 35 

Standard Oil Co., 6 00 

Wm T Tarr, harness 25 00 

$595 97 



GRAIN. 



Paid to 
Wm G Horton 
Geo B Brown 



OTHER EXPENSES. 



Paid to 
E E Currier, supplies 
E I Holland, cash paid out 
Wm McCarthy, shoeing 
Damon & Damon, insurance 
Geo A Schofield, 
Est J A Blake, supplies 
S G Todd, 

WraB Richards, " 
Brown Drug Co., " 
Wm O Conant, horse 
Ghas G Hull, printing 
A I Savory, supplies 
Stephen Jewett, damage 
H W Phillips, supplies 
W N Prescott, 



Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



Appropriation 



$182 65 




160 70 






$343 35 




$ 4 20 




1 80 




23 50 




49 20 




51 92 




6 15 




2 00 




4 50 




8 22 




IO0 00 




2 00 




5 62 




5 00 




16 00 




4 43 




— ■ 


$284 54 




$3,693 80 




331 20 




$4,025 00 




$4,025 00 



48 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



INVENTORY, STOCK, 


TOOLS, ETC AT TOWN FARM, 


Jan. 


1, 1919. Jan. 


1, 1918. 


ij 


SIO. 
1 


* VALUE 

$ 50 00 


NO. 


VALUE 


GAIN 


LOSS 


Beef Cow- 






$50 00 




Cows 


10 


1000 00 


10 


$1000 00 






Bull 


1 


75 00 


1 


75 00 






Heifers 


5 


200 00 


4 


200 00 






Horses 


3 


750 00 


2 


600 00 


150 00 




Pigs and Shoats 


4 


52 00 


2 


25 00 


27 00 




Fowl 


50 


55 00 


18 


20 00 


35 00 




Carts and Wagons 


8 


475 00 


8 


475 00 






Mowing Machine 


1 


45 00 


1 


45 oa 






Plows 


2 


25 00 


2 


25 00 






Cultivators 


2 


20 00 


2 


20 00 






Horse Hoe 


1 


5 00 


1 


5 00 






Horse Hay Fork 


1 


50 00 


1 


50 00 






Harrows 


4 


50 00 


4 


50 00 






Sleds 


1 


15 00 


1 


15 00 






Drags 


1 


6 00 


1 


6 00 






Wood, cords 


4 


40 00 


4 


40 00 






Coal, tons 


4 


48 00 


1 


9 50 


38 50 




Groceries and Provisions 




125 00 




110 00 


15 00 




Dairy Utensils 




15 00 




35 00 






Furniture and Bedding 




500 00 




500 00 






Range and Fixtures 




110 00 




110 00 






Stoves and Furnaces 




150 00 




150 00 






Tedder 


1 


15 00 


1 


15 00 






Tools 




10 00 




10 oo 






Blocks and Ropes 




5 00 




5 00 






Ice Chests 


1 


36 00 


1 


86 00 






Harness and Blankets 




100 00 




75 (0 


25 00 




Potato Digger 


1 


1 00 


I 


1 00 






Wheelbarrows 


2 


10 00 


2 


10 00 






Lumber 








25 00 




25 


Double Bob 


1 


20 00 


1 


20 00 






Seed Sower 


2 


10 00 


2 


10 00 






Wood Saw 


1 


50 00 


1 


50 00 






Hogs 


2 


150 00 


1 


75 00 


75 00 




Hay Rake 


1 


21 00 


1 


21 00 






Pump Jack 


1 


14 00 


1 


14 00 






Auto Truck 


1 


150 00 


1 


200 00 




50 


Oil Tanks 


2 


15 00 


2 


15 00 






Total 


$4468 00 


$4127 50 


415 50 75 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



49 



INVENTORY-PRODUCE, ETC. AT TOWN 
Jan. 1, 1919. Jan. 1, 1918. 



FARM. 





NO. 


VALUE' NO. 


VALUE 


GAIN 


LOSS 


Corn, bushels on cob 


150 


$150 00 






1 $150 00 




Onions, bushels 


9 


12 00 






12 00 




Beans, bushels 


4 


32 00 


o 


*16 00 


16 00 




Potatoes, bushels 


64 


100 00 


20 


30 00 


70 0O 




Roots, bushels 


185 


150 00 


6 


6 00 


144 00 




English Hay, tons 


35 


1000 00 


25 


500 00 


500 00 




Salt Hay. tons 


5 


50 00 






50 00 




Mulch, tons 


10 


50 00 


6 


30 00 


20 00 




Squash 




SO 00 




4 00 


26 00 




Vinegar, barrels 


1 


30 00 


2 


45 00 




15 00 


Salt Pork, lbs. 


125 


42 50 


125 


42 50 






Grain 




25 00 




25 00 






Total 




$1671 50 




$ 698 50 


$988 CO 


15 00 


Inv'try, Stock & Tools 




4468 00 




4127 50 


415 50 

$1403 50 


75 00 






$6139 50 




$4826 00 


90 00 






4826 00 






90 00 




Net Gain 




$1313 50 






$1313 50 





Summary of Income and Expenditures at the Town Farm for the 
Years 1914, 1915, 19i6, 1917 and 1918. 



1914 



1915 



1916 



1917 



1918 



Expended 
Income 



||$3083 81||$3640 06 |i$3823 47 ||$4203 68l|$3693 80 
|| 867 21H 1137 59 11 872 05 11 1677 06 j| 1520 11 



Net Expense 



H$2216 60!i$25Q2 47 U $2951 42 |[$2526 621IS2173 69 



Number of Inmates at Farm January 1, 1919, 11 

Average number of Inmates at Farm during the year, 10 

Average cost per week for each Inmate, $4 18 

Sales for year 1918, $1510 11 

Land rent, $10 00 

Total income for year 1918, $1520 11 

Total expenditures for year 1918, $3693 80 

Net expense for year 1918, $2173 69 

Amount collected on old accounts. $105 15 



50 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Soldiers' Benefits. 



STATE AID. 






Paid to 






Various Persons, cash 


$2684 00 




Total expenditures 




$2684 00 




Unexpended balance 


- 


1 00 

$2,685 00 


Appropriation 


$2500 00 




Transfer from Reserve Fund 


185 00 


$2,685 00 






SOLDIERS' RELIEF. 






Paid to 






Various Persons, cash 


$724 00 




Wm Conant, fuel 


48 00 




Tougas & Tougas, groceries 


78 10 




Mrs M Marcaurelle, " 


144 02 




LEWillcomb, 


99 00 




John A Brown, rent 


168 00 




Geo G Bailey, M D., medical attendance 


171 50 




Mass. General Hospital, board and care 


98 75 




Ipswich Branch, Red Cross, aid 


11 87 




Louise Hodgkins, cash paid out 


4 99 




Total expenditures 




$1548 23 




Unexpended balance 




41 77 






$1590 00 


Appropriation 


$1500 00 




Appropriation, unpaid 1917 bills 


90 00 


$1,590 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 51 



Recreation. 

PARKS. 



Paid to 
Chas H Wells, labor 
Frank T Goodhue, labor 
Alvery Marriott, " 
Samuel C Gordon, plants 
Edmund Wile, loam 
American Railway Ex., express 
Water Dept., water 
A J Brennan, supplies 
A I Savory, supplies 
Wm P Reilly, supplies 
Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



Appropriation 

Appropriation, unpaid 1917 bills 



$133 99 




91 29 




9 00 




55 33 




20 25 




55 




18 00 




13 04 




1 35 




6 15 




f, 


348 95 


4> 




1 90 




$350 85 


$350 00 




85 


«QKA QPL 



52 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Cemeteries. 

Paid to 

Edward N Martel, labor $300 93 

Chas Jewett, " 7 00 

WmMDavey, " 19 20 

LA Lord, " 284 39 

Howard Blake, " 427 50 

Philip E Clarke, " 43 00 

Howard J Blake, " 60 75 

Edward C Brooks, " 22 50 

Wm F Rutherford, " 28 50 

Orrie M Hills, " 37 66 

Albert N Willard, " 16 50 

Geo H Brockelbank, " 104 20 

DalbertKent, " 19 50 

Chester Stone, " 10 12 

Chas E Kent, " 15 00 

Alex McLellan, " 28 50 

James H Hull, Jr., " 16 50 

Edward F Smith, Jr., " 56 25 

Wm V Balias, " 6 00 

Fred L Buzzell, " 19 50 

Peter Biyeas, " 6 00 

Geo H Lord, plants 37 72 

Fatherland Farms, plants 27 60 

A I Savory, hardware and tools 22 65 

John W Goodhue, hardware and tools 3 53 
Hamilton Hardware Store, hardware and tools 10 80 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 53 



Paid to 
Water Dept., water 
A J Brennan, plumbing , 
Wm G Horton, supplies 
Canney Lumber Co., lumber 
Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



Appropriation 



$ 35 75 

116 80 

2 50 

1 30 


$1788 15 
11 85 






$1,800 00 
$1,800 00 



PERPETUAL CARE. 



Paid to 

L A Lord, labor $141 50 

Howard Blake, " 142 25 

Edward Bodwell, " 27 00 

Orrie M Hills, " 4 00 

Carrie R Brown, flowers 3 00 

Total expenditures $317 75 

Cemetery Trust Eunds, Perpetual care $317 75 



54 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Unclassified. 

MEMORIAL DAY. 

Paid to 
Gen James Appleton Post, 128, GAR $250 00 
Total expenditures $250 00 

Appropriation $250 00 

SHELL FISH. 

Paid to 
Henry A Churchill, salary 
E Warren Dodge, 
Farley C Lord, 
Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



Balance, 1917 appropriation 
Appropriation 1918 



PUBLIC SAFETY COMMITTEE. 

Paid to 

Ipswich Mills Concert Band, music $197 50 

Ipswich Military Band, " 23 30 

Chas H Galligan, cash paid out 5 95 

Ipswich Chronicle, printing 80 85 

F W Barry, Beale & Co., supplies 12 43 



m 67 

66 67 
66 66 


$200 00 
20 00 






$220 00 


$ 20 00 
200 00 


$220 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 55 



Paid to 




George Hayes, supplies 


$ 1 00 


H N Doughty, cash paid out 


42 38 


Measures Co., Inc., supplies 


32 26 


John W Goodhue, 


23 61 


John E Greene, carpentry 


62 75 


Est J A Blake, supplies 


90 


Vera Ross, cash paid out 


1 68 


Samuel C Gordon, use of team 


41 85 


Irving Manzer, " " " 


132 30 


Felix Wegzyn, " " 


9 00 


Canney Lumber Co., lumber 


18 58 


Ipswich Mills, supplies 


70 35 


D A Grady team 


4 00 


Racket Bargain Store, supplies 


2 00 


J J Merrill, labor and supplies 


39 77 


Jacob Smith, services 


20 00 


C F Chapman & Son, supplies 


3 40 


Ipswich Conservation Committee, cash paid out 


3 16 


Katherine F Sullivan, supervision 


53 89 


A J Brennan, supplies 


5 51 


Manzer & Damon, carpentry 


91 60 


C S Tyler, supplies 


08 


A I Savory, " 


17 50 


Tnfal PY'np'nH'i'fiTPPQ 


$007 c(\ 


X\J\jClL CApCilUHUICo 


«pi7l7 1 OU 


Unexpended balance 


14 40 



$1,012 00 



Appropriation $500 00 

Appropriation, unpaid 1917 bills 12 00 

Transfer from Reserve Fund 500 00 



-$1,012 00 



56 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



STATE GUARD EQUIPMENT. 

Paid to 
Talbot Company, Salem, suits, etc. 

Boston, overcoats, etc. 
Wm Winship Co., belts 
Geo S Saunders Co., revolver 
Oliver Ditson Co., bugle and cord 
Harding Uniform & Regalia Co., supplies 
National Rifle Asso., membership fee 
Pilgrim Rubber Footwear Co., overshoes 
American Railway Ex. Co., express 
Frank Goodwin, use of truck 
Blaisdell's Express, use of truck 
Canney Lumber Co., lumber 
Iver- Johnson Sporting Goods Co., supplies 
Winfield L Johnson, cash paid out 
C S Tyler, supplies 
A C Damon, supplies 
Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



Appropriation 



$1693'20 

1535 75 

45 00 

17 50 

8 25 
58 35 
10 00 

235 44 
1 60 

18 00 
35 00 
58 48 
75 00 
27 58 

19 14 

9 85 



$3748 14 
951 86 



$4,700 00 
$4,700 00 



BROWN SCHOOL FUND, 

Paid to 
Bay State St. Ry. Co., transportation 
Total expenditures 

Received from Trustees Brown School Fund 



$90 00 



$90 00 

$90 00 



IPSWICH TOWN EEPORT. 5Y 



Reserve Fund 

Transferred to Town Hall Department 
" Health Department 
'* Public Safety Committee 
" State Aid Account 

Total amt. transferred by Finance Committee 

Unexpended balance 



Appropriation 



$ 300 00 




2000 00 




500 00 




185 00 







$2985 00 




15 00 




$3,000 00 




$3,000 00 





CD 


-«tf 00 lO rH 


t*« CD 


CO CO Tt< 


to to 


r- ( 


to 


CD 


CO -X © 


^, 


03 


(N 05 OJ 00 


— < CM 


CM CM CD 


»-i CM 


to 


-^ 


© 


^ © CM 


00 
tO 


(M so £- 


^J" 


© © 


i—( CD 


CM 




CO 


CD tO i-i 


>™"j 


t-H © »— • 




TT O 


CO CO 


T— ( 




t> 


© i— I CO 




05 


r- » 




CO 


to 






CM 


00 CO 




m 


€«■ 
















<X> 




















^^ mm 




















09 




















W^ m 
























CO N lO Oi 


CD ^t 


fc- t- CD 


to lO 


OS OS 


to 


"^ 


i-H © © 


co 




fc- © O l-H 


00 t> 


C- fc- CO 


00 t- 


TJ» CO 


to 


© 


CM CM 00 


N 05 00 (M 


"*f tO 


© as o 


00 50 


t- 00 


OS 


CD 


CO H CO 


>- 


c 


JO "^ CO ^ 


t*- to 


CM t- i-H 


—- (X> 


OS t- 


OS 


CM 


CM © © 




CD 


n tj tc a 


t* to 


«0 "<* CM 


"** 


CM kO 


CO 


t- 


C- TJ1 © 


__ 


X 


N r- M 




CM to 


fc- 


"* 




t> 


© t- CO 


ro 


w- 














r-4 


.2* 


















O 




















«— 








































3 




















s 




o o o o 


o o 


o o o 


o o 


© © 


© 


© 


^t t- © 






o o o o 


o o 


o o o 


© © 


O CO 


© 


© 


CO rH © 


o» 


15 


tO o »o o 


to o 


© o o 


© o 


© 00 


© 


© 


Tf c- to 


*^~ 


-r^ 


t- to oo to 


fc- CD 


t- 00 CM 


to o 


-H t>- 


© 


© 


CO rH CM 


^"^ 


o 


CM tJ< CD 00 


^ to 


to ^ to 


© T-i 


co to 


Tf 


© 


tO Tf © 


. 


H 


eg h « 




CM to 


t- 


Tj< 




00 


© r- ^ 


e 




e© 














CM 


*^~ 




















CO 




















+-* 




















EZ 


TJ 




















£ aj 






o o 




to 




© 


t*« 






o o 




00 




© 


00 


+ > 


co a; 


















u 








o © 




o 




© 


CO 


CO 






O CM 




CD 




© 


© 


^x. 






CO f 




CO 




to 


CM 


a» 






«© 




CM 




^ 


to 


* 




















.£2 




o o o o 


o o 


S 2 o 


© o 


© Tj< 


© 


© 


^ CO © 


cs 
E 




o o o o 


o o 


o o o 


© © 


© to 


© 


© 


© CO © 


• 


»o O lO o 


to o 


5? £ © 


© © 


© J> 


© 


© 


Tt CO w 


o 


fc- tO 00 CD 


t- CD 


t- oo o 


to o 


t-H rH 


© 


© 


CO rH CM 


>« 


$-4 


CM r* CD 00 


^ to 


lO H oo 


© rH 


CO CM 


T* 


to 


tO CM © 


ca 


a 


CM -H CO 




CM rg* 


t- 


CM 




CO 


© CM ""* 


a. 


Pi 
< 


6©- 














CM 


ncs 




















cs 




















CO 




bo 




C 










C 


o 




In +* 




o 

•t-H 

03 




CO 

(V 

3 






.2 

o 
u 


CO 




O £3 




CO 




CO 






*£^ 


-*j 


£ o 




'5b 

CD 

■■■a 

o ^ 
•■- 1 — CD 

ni ^ i— i 




03 






CO 


q^ 


c 


C 03 

cd bo cd £ 
£ c £ o 

tD TH =6 CD 

J±i s i) co 
W < H <3 






CD 






C 


O 
EX 


0) 

S 

03 

a 
P 


CD 

O 


CD 

u 

03 
CO 

2 2 


C 
03 
CO 

bo SL 

•1-4 -*J 

CD o 


oo 
CD 
CD 


CD 


o 

CO $ J_ 

>? 3 & 






03 O -=« O O .S O 

>J H H H Ph fc fo 




^h co O 

W W H 






co 



C-3 

• 
00 

+-* 

o 

E 

ret 

Q- 

*o 
s 
rs 

c/> 

cs 



0) 

cO 
CO 






03 
O 



T3 

CO j_ 

en ,« 

^ as 



o 
< 



+3 



CO 

a 
Q 



t- o 




00 


o 


O 
O 


O 


CD 


i© 

00 


CO 
CM 


o 
o 


CD 1-1 

CM 




rH 


rH 


O 
CM 


i—i 


i© 
OS 


rH 
1— ( 


CM 

a* 


i© 
i— 1 



COOCQOO'OOOO-^iAt^OO 
lO OW ^CiOOCOrH-iC-OO 

M^OOMOOOOt-OOOO^Cifl 
CMOOrri— |TriOO0^~P00rHO00 

t-COl(5W<WNN05r-C*OH05 



€r> 



(M 



CD 



« h oo h :i 



00©C©i©0©OOOOQO 

ooocooooooooooo 

©iO©Tf©©©<M©©£-©© 
©a00}l©*©i©CM~<O©©©© 

0(DlCt>MNiNOt>X»2HO 
00 <M rH CO rH <*< — h 00 i-H co 



o 

8 

rH 



O 

o 
to 



OOOCD^OOOOOOOO 

o o O CO oooooooooo 

OOOrfOOOCMOOt^OO 
OOO^iO^iOCMrHOoOOO 

oSwt-MNNiOt-OO^Ho 
00<M-H«O tj» h 00 H m 

V&. -r, i-l 



3 



u 

o 
o 



•8 



3 -> o 



09 



CO 

o 

13 



03 






co 



ciS 

Q 

C3 CO 

• — »I-H 



II 



S 9 








».-< cu 








S S 








S .9 








© 3 








CJ o< 






-P 




r/5 




Q 53 




CU 




bfl^ 


cy 

4-> 


1) 


C CD 


Publi 
State 
Ceme 


$-1 

0) 

c 

H 


Matu 
Reser 



60 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Perpetual Care--Cemetery Funds. 

Amount Balance 

Name of Fund. Jan. 1918 Income Expense Jan. 1919 

Cogswell $404 97 $16 20 $4 00 $417 37 

Andrews 278 16 10 93 5 00 279 09 

Giddings 162 77 6 51 3 00 166 28 

Potter 125 39 5 02 3 00 127 41 

Kinsman 72 55 2 90 1 50 73 95 

Samuel Blood 65 48 2 62 2 00 66 10 

Staniford 121 86 4 87 1 50 125 23 

Trow 418 36 :6 73 3 00 432 09 

Dawson 151 51 6 06 2 00 155 57 

Birch 53 62 2 14 2 00 53 76 

Aaron Kinsman 57 25 2 29 2 00 57 54 

Varrell 373 51 L4 94 3 00 885 45 

Eben Kimball 186 06 7 44 3 50 190 00 

Willcomb 79 93 3 00 2 00 80 93 

Daniel Clarke 135 24 5 41 2 00 138 65 

Rogers & Johnson 108 63 4 35 4 00 108 98 

Hannah L. Kimball 145 31 5 81 2 00 149 12 

George Kinsman 146 23 5 85 2 00 150 08 

Martha Lakeman 70 06 2 80 1 00 71 86 

Caldwell 124 56 4 98 4 00 125 54 

Pingree 102 08 4 08 2 00 104 16 

Young 25 46 1 02 1 00 25 48 

Couburn 320 40 12 81 5 00 328 21 

Mary Haskell 55 87 2 23 1 50 56 60 

Hovey 132 88 5 32 3 00 135 20 

Plouff 58 48 2 34 2 00 58 82 

Farley 146 82 5 87 2 00 150 69 

John B Lamson 70 16 2 81 1 %0 71 97 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



61 





Amount 


» 




Balance 


Name of Fund 


Jan. 1918 


Income 


Expense Jan. 1919 


Joseph Spiller 


$ 57 94 


$2 32 


$2 00 


$ 58 26 


Locust Grove 


39 43 


1 48 




40 91 


Mary E Peatfield 


116 33 


4 65 


2 00 


118 98 


Lucy F Spiller 


62 44 


2 49 


1 50 


63 43 


Josiah & Lydia H Lord 


147 87 


5 91 


* 


153 78 


Eben Caldwell 


118 04 


4 72 


3 00 


119 76 


M K Barber 


59 19 


2 37 




61 56 


Sarah E Durgin 


104 21 


4 17 


2 00 


106 48 


Joanna Kinsman 


124 53 


4 98 


2 50 


127 01 


Charles W Giddins 


118 54 


4 74 




123 28 


John Allen Brown 


125 61 


5 02 


2 00 


128 63 


Millett & Kimball 


226 84 


9 07 


10 00 


225 91 


Samuel Blake 


132 45 


5 30 


3 50 


134 25 


William G Brown 


140 88 


5 63 


3 00 


143 51 


Catherine Clarke 


137 96 


5 52 


2 00 


141 48 


Charles Palmer 


113 30 


4 53 


2 00 


115 83 


Sally Roberts 


148 25 


5 93 


2 00 


152 18 


Eugene Spinney 


136 35 


5 45 


2 00 


139 80 


Mary M Field 


66 20 


2 65 




68 85 


Luther Lord 


127 93 


5 12 


2 00 


131 05 


Ezra Lord 


135 60 


5 42 


' 2 00 


139 02 


Lucy H Brown 


134 64 


5 39 


2 00 


138 03 


Patience C Bray 


118 36 


4 73 


3 00 


120 09 


Richard T Dodge 


134 30 


5 37 


3 00 


136 67 


Henry F Russell 


107 56 


4 30 


2 50 


109 36 


George Haskell 


323 71 


12 95 


5 00 


331 66 


Theodore C Howe 


131 81 


5 27 


2 00 


135 08 


Nathaniel Shatswell 


129 28 


5 17 


2 00 


132 45 


George H Gilmore 


67 29 


2 69 


1 50 


68 48 


Wm A & Ida M Stackpole 


163 30 


6 53 


2 00 


167 83 


Hannah H Pearson 


63 00 


2 52 


3 00 


62 52 


Harry K Dodge 


129 66 


5 18 


2 00 


132 84 


Henry S Holmes 


112 23 


4 48 


4 00 


112 71 


Caroline E Hodgkins 


55 86 


2 23 


1 50 


56 59 



62 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Name of Fund. 
Aaron F Brown Fund 
J Farley Kinsman 
Thomas Brown 



Amount 

Jan. 1918 

$ 68 53 

121 05 

112 23 



Wm P & Arthur W Gould 128 41 

Lucy C Coburn 262 11 

Wm H Kinsman 117 42 

Caroline E Bomer 114 03 

Elizabeth A Bailey 59 34 

John Lane 53 94 

Hannah Parsons 63 08 

E & T F Cogswell 100 00 
Moses & Ezekiel Peabody 109 84 

Charles H Cutler 124 87 

Wm & Abagail Haskell 54 67 

Willis & Stacey 122 63 

George E Lord 120 93 

Nora Frazier 55 77 

Franklin G Morris 123 66 

Robert Stone 52 43 

Emerson Howe 118 62 
Caroline E Lord - 100 53 

Robert Gilmore 242 37 

John D Cilley 122 26 

James Griffin 119 59 
Eunice Caldwell Cowles 125 34 

Ward F Kenney 56 38 

Josiah Dudley 106 12 

John C Kimball 361 61 

Jenet F Caldwell 193 09 

Rebecca G Hayes 52 79 

John Galbraith 105 37 

Thomas Holland 116 90 

John Choate 79 38 

Lucy Slade Lord 125 02 



Income 

$ 2 74 

4 84 

4 49 

5 13 
10 48 

4 70 
4 56 
2 37 
2 16 
2 52 
4 00 
4 39 
4 99 
2 23 
4 90 
4 84 
2 23 
4 94 
2 10 
4 74 
4 02 
9 69 
4 89 

4 78 

5 01 
2 26 
4 24 

14 46 
7 72 
2 11 
4 21 

4 68 
2 48 

5 00 



Balance 

Expense Jan. 1911* 

$ 71 37 

2 00 123 39 

2 00 114 72 

2 00 131 54 

272 59 



2 50 
2 00 

1 50 

2 00 

3 75 

2 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2X)0 
2 00 

1 50 

2 00 
2 00 

4 00 

4 50 
2 00 
2 00 
2 CO 

1 50 

2 00 

5 50 

1 50 

3 00 

2 00 

4 00 



119 62 

116 59 

60 21 

54 10 

65 60 

100 25 

112 23 

127 86 

54 9d 

125 53 
123 77 

56 50 

126 60 

52 53 
119 36 
100 05 
250 06 
125 15 
122 37 
130 35 

57 14 
108 36 
370 57 
200 81 

53 40 
106 58 
119 58 

77 85 
130 02 









IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Amount 






Balance 


Name of Fund 


Jan. 1919 


Income 


Expense 


Jan. 1919 


Walter E Lord 


$111 74 


$4 47 


$2 00 


114 21 


Lemuel Smith 


52 33 


2 09 


1 50 


52 92 


Samuel J Goodhue 


55 61 


2 22 


1 50 


56 33 


John A Johnson 


114 66 


4 59 


2 00 


117 25 


Charles H Noyes 


55 07 


2 20 


1 50 


55 77 


Edwin H Damon 


55 07 


2 20 


1 50 


55 77 


Benjamin Newman 


114 53 


4 58 


2 00 


117 11 


Nathaniel Archer 


111 95 


4 48 


3 00 


1J3 43 


Abby J Purington 


113 98 


4 56 


2 00 


116 54 


Sarah A Seward 


112 63 


4 50 


2 00 


115 13 


Frances P Weeks 


55 52 


2 22 


1 50 


56 24 


George A Lord 


53 76 


2 15 


2 00 


53 91 


William Heard 


107 56 


4 30 


3 00 


108 86 


Martha E Hanson 


224 55 


8 98 


2 00 


231 53 


Charlotte M Kimball 


113 67 


4 55 


2 00 


116 22 


Mary J Patterson 


109 81 


4 39 


3 50 


110 70 


William L Rust 


51 10 


2 04 


1 50 


51 64 


E Maria Stone 


79 81 


3 19 




83 00 


L S & E B Jewett 


264 15 


10 57 


6 00 


268 72 


John Cook 


52. 08 


2 08 


1 50 


52 66 


Jonathan L Choate 


159 36 


6 36 


3 00 


162 72 


Sarah E Twombly 


104 20 


4 17 


3 00 


105 37 


N S & Eben Kimball 


104 24 


4 17 


4 00 


104 41 


General James Appleton 


256 70 


10 27 


8 00 


258 97 


Etta L Wentworth 


51 58 


2 06 


2 00 


51 64 


Baker & Dixon 


43 26 


2 13 


1 00 


44 39 


Charles H Baker 


77 56 


3 10 


2 00 


78 66 


Jeremiah Brocklebank 


50 50 


2 02 


1 50 


51 02 


William H Russell 


50 50 


2 02 


1 50 


51 02 


Winthrop Low 


50 50 


2 02 


1 50 


51 02 


Edward Morrill 


50 50 


2 02 


1 50 


51 02 


Richard L Spiller 


101 00 


4 04 


3 00 


102 04 


Abbie M Fellows 


51 00 


2 04 


1 50 


51 54 


Nathaniel R Farley 


102 00 


4 08 


2 00 


104 08 



64 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 





Amount 






Balance 


Name of Fund 


Jan. 1918 


Income 


Expense Jan. 1919 


Eunice & Elizabeth Farley $51 00 


$2 04 


$ 2 00 


$ 51 04 


Mrs Chas S Willcomb 


102 00 


4 08 


2 00 


104 08 


Elizrbath L Chapman Est 


151 00 


6 04 


5 00 


152 04 


Clara B Dobson 


50 50 


2 02 


1 50 


51 02 


Mrs Chas D Weeks 


78 00 


3 12 




81 12 


Mary E Roberts 


103 67 


4 15 


3 50 


104 32 


Everard H Martin 


100 00 


4 00 


2 50 


101 50 


John B Brown 


103 00 


4 12 




107 12 


Mrs Harriett A Lamson 


50 50 


2 02 


1 50 


51 02 


William Kimball 


75 19 


3 01 


2 00 


76 20 


Olive P Smith 


100 00 


4 00 


2 00 


102 00 


David F Dow 


50 00 


2 00 


2 00 


50 00 


Eliza A Foss 


50 00 


1 50 




51 50 


Sylvanus Caldwell 


100 00 


3 00 




103 00 


Mary J Staniford Est 


100 00 


5 50 


2 00 


103 50 


Frank H Lord 


100 00 


2 00 




102 00 


Mary E Bowen 


50 00 


1 00 




51 00 


Peatfleld Fund 


100 00 


1 00 




101 00 


H B Brown 


75 00 


75 




75 75 


Geo A Mann 


100 00 


1 00 




101 00 


Alice H Bone 


50 00 . 


50 




50 50 


John H Baker 


50 00 






50 00 


Everett K & Margaretta 










Brown 


100 00 






100 00 


$17442 34 


$67S 22 


$317 75 $17802 81 


Income undivided 








9 58 



$17812 39 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 65 



RECEIPTS, 



Amount of Fund, January, 1918 
.New Funds during the year 
Income from Investments 



EXPENDITURES. 
Paid for care of lots 



INVESTMENT ACCOUNT. 



Town of Ipswich, Electric Light 4s 

" " " Water 4s 
City of Fitchburg School 4s 
Water Front Improvement Loan 4s 
Liberty Bonds 
Ipswich Savings Bank 



$16476 08 
$975 00 
679 06 
— $1654 06 


$1S,130 14 
$317 75 

$017 rrc 


col I io 


$17,812 39 

$2000 00 
7500 00 
3000 00 
2100 00 
2600 00 
612 39 



$17,812 39 



INCOME ACCOUNT, 



Balance undivided January, 1918 $8 74 

Town of Ipswich Electric Light Loan 

Town of Ipswich, Water 

City of Fitchburg, School Loan 

Water Front Improvement 

Liberty Bonds 

Ipswich Saving's Bank 



$687 80 



$ 80 00 




300 00 




120 00 




84 00 




64 00 




31 06 






$679 06 





66 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

CREDIT. 

Cemetery Funds $678 22 

Income undivided January, 1919 9 58 

$687 80 






IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 






ELIZIBETH M. BROWN FUND. 

Town of Ipswich, in trust, the income to be used under the 
direction of the Selectmen, by the Agent of the Society for the 
Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, 

Balance, January, T918 $844 82 
Income 34 10 
Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank, Jan. 191^ $878 92 



JOHN C. KIMBALL FUND. 

Town of Ipswich, Trustee, under the will of John C. Kimball, 
income to be used for the purchase of books for the Ipswich Public 
Library. 

Balance, January, 1918 
Income 

July 24, 19 8, paid to F A Kimball, Treasurer 

Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank, January, 1919 $522 46 



$611 08 




22 46 






$633 54 






111 08 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT, 



Assessors Report, 

APPROPRIATIONS. 

Education $46500 0G> 

Highway and Snow 19000 00 

Town Notes 11 100 00 

Interest 8507 00 

Poor 8uOO 00 

Fire department 6950 00 

Police 4800 00 

Poor Farm 4025 00 

Treasurer and Collector 3685 00 

State Aid 25C0 00 

Health Department 3500 00 

Electric Light 2450 00 

Town Hall 2180 00 

Selectmen 2275 00 

Cemeteries 1800 00 

Auditing and Accounting" 1450 00 

Assessors 860 00 

Town Clerk 560 00 

Election and Registrations 575 00 

Soldiers' Relief 1500 00 

Tree Warden 400 00 

Public Safety Committee 500 00 

Parks 350 00 

Law 3C0 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 69 



Memorial Day 


$ 250 00 


Forest Warden 


100 00 


Weights and Measures 


210 00 


Highways (additional) 


1300 00 


Fire Department (additional) 


1000 00 


Shellfish 


200 00 


Moth Work 


2211 59 




$139,038 59 


Total appropriations 


$139,038 59 


County Tax 


9,124 65 


State Tax 


12,870 00 


State Highway Tax 


4,420 50 


Overlay for 1918 


1,193 55 


Excess of abatements above overlay in 1916 


850 36 



Whole amount to be raised $167,497 65 

Estimated income 38,888 95 



$128,608 70 
Non-resident bank tax 550 20 



Total amount assessed $129,158 90 

Amount assessed on 1480 Polls $ 2,960 00 

Amount assessed on Property 126,198 90 



Amount of Personal Property assessed $1,195,675 

Amount on Real Estate assessed 4,438,200 

Value of buildings assessed 3,097,245 

Value of land assessed 1,340,961 



70 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Number of horses 




371 




' cows 




654 




1 sheep 




40 


<<. < 


' other neat cattle 




175 




' swine 




82 




* fowl 




4200 




' acres of land 




17645 




' persons assessed 




2186 




on 


property 


1206 




on 


poll only 


yso 




1 dwelling houses 




1300 


Rate of Taxation, $22.40 on 


$1000. 





Taxpayers would frequently be saved from disappoint- 
ment if they wouid make in due season the returns contemplated by 
the law' Every year notices are posted requiring all persons lo 
bring in lists of their taxable assets by the fifteenth of May. Out 
two thousand taxpayers perhaps twenty present such lists. But 
when one thinks his personal property has been valued too highly, 
and tha+ he is entitled to a reduction he finds himself penalized for 
his delay. In such cases assessors have no authority to abate fully 
if at all, and are themselves liable to a penalty for failure to com- 
ply with the law. Blanks prepared for making such returns can be 
had on application. 



JOHN W. NOURSE, 
RICHARD R. GLASIER, 
GEORGE FALL, 



Assessors 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 71 



Town Clerk's Report. 

To the Selectmen of Ipswich, 
Gentlemen : 

In submitting my annual report of the doings of the Clerk's 
Office, I would call the attention of the citizens of the Town to the 
fact that quite a number of the books in the office are in such con- 
dition that they cannot be used until they have been rebound ; and 
I shall be compelled to have that done as soon as possible. I refer 
particularly to the books of records that are in daily use, the Vital 
Statistics and Records of Town Meetings. All these books must be 
kept in good condition as they are in use every day. I find that the 
older records are being consulted a great deal more in recent years, 
not only for historical and geanealogical purposes but for the pur- 
pose of establishing the rights of the Town and of individuals. 

Many of these books have not received the care that should 
have been given them in years past, and are now in such condition 
that I have been compelled to withhold them f -lorn use as much as 
possible. Now I can cause the work of rebinding and repairing done 
without asking for an appropriation for that work, but I am sure 
that the Town would not refuse to grant any reasonable sum I ask 
for when the need was thoroughly understood. I have asked the 
Finance Committee to consider my request that a sum may be ap- 
propriated for the purpose of having the work done. 

I would also state that a decided change has been made in the 
matter of the returns of vital statistics, not only in the offices of 
Clerks of Cities and Towns, but in the office of the Secretary of the 
Commonwealth. The laws in relation to births and deathe are 



72 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

particularly noticeable in that the responsibility of parents and phy- 
sicians, also midwives are more clearly set forth, although the laws 
are no more stringent than before ; but the fact that much trouble 
and dissatisfaction has been caused by neglect to enforce the re- 
quirements of law has led the Secretary of the Commonwealth to 
require of the Clerks of Cities and Towns a more careful attention 
to that line of duty. In the matter of births, a report of the birth 
of a child must be made to the Town Clerk within fifteen days after 
the birth, giving all the particulars of the case required by law ; 
date of birth, name of the child, sex, color, name and occupation of 
parents, their place of birth, physician or person attending the 
birth, the return to be made on blanks approved by the Common- 
wealth. Failure to meet the repuirements of the law will result in 
the enforcement of the penalties of law. 

Deaths must be reported to the Clerk of the Board of Health 
before permits for burial will be granted, the certificate of death 
must be delivered to the Town Clerk for record. 

Notices of intention of marriage must be filed with the Town 
Clerk five days before the Certificate can be issued. 

After a marriage has been solemnized the certificate of the 
marriage must be returned to the Clerk of the Town issuing it on 
or before the tenth day of the month following the marriage. 

All returns of births and deaths made by Physicians, mid- 
wives and undertakers must be filled out in ink, and written in a 
good legible hand or the Clerk or registrar is instructed to refuse 
them for record. Erasures or pencil writing must be refused. 

During the past year the Clerk has had much trouble in 
meeting the requirements of the laws of the Commonwealth be- 
cause of the failure of parties, responsible for the correct returns 
necessary to complete the Records. 

These returns and statistics are of great importance not only 
to the parties most directly concerned, but also as a means to en- 
able the authorities to meet any emergency that may arise in the 
State or in the community, and if properly attended to as they 
should be, will be of great benefit in time of need, and also in any 
trouble that may arise from sickness or epidemics. 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



73 



The Clerk in bringing these matters to the attention of the 
people does it, not in a spirit of fault finding, but because the laws 
covering the matters referred to must in order to be effective be 
enforced . 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



BIRTHS. 



Births 194. Males 117. Females 77. 

By months —January 16, February 14, March 31, April 24, 
May 12, June 15, July 23, August 14, September 17, October 9, No- 
vember 8, December 11. 

Occupation of Fathers— Teamsters 6, Carpenters 5, Clerks 5, 
US Navy 4, Mill Operatives 98, Laborers 19, Farmers 6, U S Army 
3, Gardeners 3, Machinists 2, Grocers 2, Tailors 2, Barbers 2, Paint- 
ers 2, Cooks 2, Shoe Cutter 1, Heel Maker 1, Mechanic 1, Insurance 
1, Heel Cutter 1, Purchasing Agent 1, Mill Agent 1, Electrician 1, 
Conductor 1, Dentist 1, Fireman 1, Merchant 2, Wholesale Liquors 
1, Bookkeeper 1, Fruit Dealer 1, Engineer 1, Professor 1, Chauffeur 
1 , Demonstrator 1 , Superintendent of Estate 1, Manager of Pub- 
lishing Company 1, Mechanical Engineer 1, Bank Clerk 1, Milkman 
1, Railroadman 1, not given 7. 



*s born 


in Ipswich 


17 


Mothers born in Ipswich 


16 


u 


Mass 


21 


a 


Mass 


29 


tt 


US 


9 


a 


US 


7 


tt 


Brit. Prov. 


16 


n 


Brit. Prov. 


18 


«< 


England 


2 


a 


Ireland 


6 


<« 


Ireland 


2 


tt 


Greece 


56 




Russia ) 




tt 


Russia ) 




a 


Austria \ 
Poland ) 


60 


tt 


Austria [■ 
Poland ) 


60 


tt 


Greece 


56 


tt 


Italy 


2 


tt 


Italy 


4 


a 


Scotland 


1 


tt 


Portugal 


1 


a 


Portugal 


1 


a 


Sweden 


1 


tt 


Sweden 


1 




Unknown 


5 




Not reported 


2 



74 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT, 







MARRIAGES. 








Whole number recorded, 66. 










Grooms born in 


i Ipswich 


ia 


Brides born in Ipswich 




13 


»< 


Mass 


13 




Mass 


• 


9 


n 


US 


6 




US 




4 


♦< 


Brit. Prov, 


7 




Brit. Prov. 


13 


»< 


Greece 
Austria j 


9 




Greece 
Austria 


I 
\ 


9 


«■«■ 


Russia 
Poland ) 


7 




Russia 


7 








Poland 




*« 


Germany] 


1 




England 




1 



56 56 

Marriages by months- January 2, February 6, March 5, April 
4, May 3, June 5, July 9, August 7, September 3, October 5, No- 
vember 5, December 2. 

By whom married— Protistant 28, Roman Catholic 15, Greek 
Church 9, Justice of the Peace 4. Total 56. 



DEATHS. 

Whole number deaths 126. 

Males 65. Females 61. Total 126. 



Born in 



Ipswich 


54 


Died in January 


13 


Mass 


19 


" February 


7 


US 


5 


" March 


9 


Brit. Prov, 


18 


" April 


9 


England 


7 


" May 


4 


Aus.Rus. Poland 


12 


M June 


7 


Greece 


5 


" July 


6 


Italy 


2 


" August 


1 


Ireland 


2 


" September 


21 


Scotland 


1 


" October 


37 


Germany 


1 


" November 


6 






1 ' December 


6 



126 



126 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 75 

The following- table gives the ages of deceased. 

Less than one year old 24 

One year to ten 8 

Ten years to twenty 1 

Twenty to thirty 22 

Thirty to forty 12 

Forty to fifty 10 

Fifty to sixty 10 

Sixty to seventy -11 

Seventy to eighty ) 9 

Eighty and less than ninety 10 

126 
Almost all the deaths occurring in September and Octo* 
ber are to be charged to the epidemic of Influenza and Pneumonia 
raging at that time. The deaths from other causes being very few. 
in fact had not that trouble arisen the death roll for Ipswich for 
the year would have been very small. 

The following licenses have been recorded : 
Innholders 4 Common Victuallers 6 

Billiards and Pool 10 Bowling Alley 1 

Junk Dealers 6 Slaughter House 1 

Hunter's License, native residents 200 

Hunter's License, foreign resident 1 

Dog Licenses 211 Kennel Licenses 2 

Lobster Licenses, native residents 4 

The Standard Oil Company has filed as usual notice of inten* 
tion to continue business in Ipswich and the location of local plantv 

' CHARLES W, BAMFORD, Town Clerk, 



76 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Engineers' Report. 

To the Selectmen of Ipswich : 

Following is the report of the Board of Engineers of the Fire 

Department for the year ending December 31, 1918 : 

Number of men in department 40 

" box alarms 15 

" " still alarms 48 

Total number of alarms 63 

Property threatened by fire $32,650 00 

Insurance on same 18,200 00 

Insurance paid 1,092 00 

Property Loss 2,250 00 

DEPARTMENT EQUIPMENT. 

Steamer 1 

Hook & Ladder 1 

Auto Combination Chemical & Hose 1 

Hose Wagons 2 

Hose Reels 4 

Fire Alarm Boxes 19 

Number feet hose 6,250 

Value of department equipment $15,000 00 

Value of buildings occupied by Dept. 20,000 00 

Value of Fire Alarm equipment 3,500 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 77 

Last year we reported the condition of the steamer and re- 
commended that the Town consider the purchase of a motor pump- 
ing engine to replace the same. 

We wish to report that the steamer gave out in the early part 
of the year and we were obliged to replace the same by purchasing 
one from the City of Beverly rather than to expend the required 
amount to repair our own. 

We are of the opinion that the Town should investigate and 
consider the advisability of purchasing a combination pumping 
engine in the near future as reported last year. 

ARTHUR H. WALTON, ) 

EDWIN M. POOLE, Y Engineers. 

WALTER G. BROWN, ) 



78 IPSWICH TOV^N REPORT 



Overseers of the Poor Report. 

OUT-POOR DEPARTMENT. 

The work of the Overseers in this department during the 
past twelve months has not varied greatly from that of recent 
years. There have been no particular changes in the Statutes or 
rulings of the State Board of Charities to necessitate change of 
action on the part of local boards of Overseers Therefore, the 
problems, with few exceptions, have been of the usual nature and 
their solution accomplished along well-established lines. Several 
names have been dropped from the list of dependents ; some be- 
cause of change of circumstances having made the con :inuance of 
aid unnecessary, others by loss of legal settlement through volun- 
tary absence from town covering a period of five years, while still 
others have found merciful relief from all earth's troubles in the 
tomb. Yet, while these have been dropped from the list of the 
town's wards, a number of new names have been necessarily added 
thereto, leaving the total substantially as heretofore. Poverty 
ever stalks in the midst of plenty, and no matter how much of this 
world's goods may be given the majority to enjoy, there are al- 
ways tnose who are found to be lacking the bare necessities 
of life and who would perish in a land of abundance but for the 
kindly hand of charity. Nor does the law of the Commonwealth or 
prevailing public sentiment allow charity officials to draw any hard- 
and-fast lines between the cases of unavoidable poverty and those 
that are purely self-imposed. There may be gross mismanagement 
in family affairs, but if nature has denied the good judgment that 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 79 

it allots to the common run of individuals, the applicant for aid in 
such instances cannot reasonably be held responsible nor aid refus- 
ed. These cases, however, should be and are given careful and 
continuous attention, wise counsel offered, and every possible in- 
fluence brought to bear to lift the family, if haply it can be done, 
from the condition of dependence to that of self-support. Again, 
the mother, struggling with her brood of little ones, must not suf- 
fer the pangs of hunger nor be found shelterless and scantily 
clothed during the rigors of the winter season because of the mis. 
demeanors of the father. The experience of the Overseers has 
proven that n«> single circumstance is so much responsible for ex- 
isting poverty as the over-indulgence in intoxicating liquors. This 
fact presents a problem to charity officials that is most difficult of 
solution. It is evident to chose who give it close s:udy that the 
course to be pursued must vary with the nature of the cases. The 
last sid to be invoked is that of the Courts, and the Overseers do not 
hesitate whenever such action becomes imperative. While it is true 
that there has bsen no lack of work to be found during the past 
year and wages have reached a higher level than ever before, yet 
the aged and infirm, the widow and orphan, have not been able to 
take advantage of the good times. On the contrary, their condition 
has been made more unbearable because of the heights to which the 
price of commodities has risen, and in some cases it has been found 
necessary to increase the allowance in order to keep the wolf from 
the door. This fact, together with the epidemic of influenza in the 
autumn, caused the expenditures of this department to be some- 
what in excess of what they otherwise would have been. The 
Overseers are not prophets and, therefore, cannot read the future 
or foretell coming events, .The best they can do is to take a general 
survey of the situation at the year's beginning, ask for an approp- 
riation that appears sufficient to meet the probable needs, and then 
await developments. In t heir care of the unfortunate during the 
past year the Overseers feel that they have neither been niggardly 
towards the pcor nor wasteful of the public funds. All cases have 
been investigated as thoroughly as possible, allowance made to 
meet present need, and the work so closely followed up as to re- 



80 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

duce or wholly withdraw the aid whenever conditions warranted. 
Last year the Town appropriated $8,000. for the use of this depart- 
ment, of which $7,723.53 has been expended, leaving a balance of 
$276.47 reverting to the treasury. The reimbursements to the de- 
partment for aid extended on behalf of the Commonwealth and 
other cities and towns amounts to $1,365.43, leaving a net expense 
to the town of $6,358.10, which is considered to be a very satisfac- 
tory showing in these unusual times. It is a trifle better even 
than in 1917. 

TOWN FARM DEPARTMENT. 

The work in this department has been carried forward with 
a large measure of satisfaction to the Overseers. The new super- 
intendent, Mr. Edgar I. Holland, has proved a capable farmer and 
manager, while Mrs. Holland has made an excellent matron, care- 
ful and economical in the administration of the home as well as 
kiddly attention to the needs of the inmates, several of whom more 
strictly speaking may be regarded as patients. The management 
of this farm and almshouse is yeaily a task not easy of accomplish- 
ment. It requires not only skill and judgment, but much hard and 
painstaking labor, not six but seven days each week, holidays in- 
cluded. Labor has been scarce and so high in price as to have been 
prohibitive except in the spring planting and haying seasons. Dur- 
ing the fall harvesting and the winter months the superintendent 
has toiled alone, save for such assistance as some of the inmates 
were able to offer. 'When we consider the comparatively small 
salary afforded him, we feel that he has certainly earned our hearty 
commendation and thanks. Our summer garden furnishes for the 
home an abundance of peas, string beans, potatoes, lettuce, chard, 
rhubarb, cucumbers, early beets, tomatoes, sweet corn, melons, etc 
Our fall harvest yielded 160 bushels marketable potatoes, 55 bush- 
els of turnip, 30 bushels of beets, 65 bushels of onions, 20 bushels 
of carrots, 5 bushels parsnips, 2% tuns of squashes, 1H tons of 
pumpkins, 6% bushels of beans, 500 heads of cabbage, 201 bushels 
of corn on the cob, and 230 bushels of mangles. This produce was 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 81 

not estimated^ but actually .treasured. Our crop of English hay, 
like that of all other farms in this region, fell below that of the 
average year. Where we should have cut about 70 tons, the num- 
ber dropped to 45 tons estimated. The extra 25 tons of the usual 
cutting, sold say at $80.. per ton, would have increased our income 
$750, less some extra cost of labor, and have made a showing of 
which we might well have been pr ud. Ten tons of salt hay were 
also cut. 

In accordance with our recommendation of last year, the 
town appropriated $325. for the installation of the telephone, but 
when spring opened the Government had made regulations prohib- 
iting the use of material in all new construction of this nature, and 
the work was not done The ap >ropriation, however, was not used 
but had reverted to the town treasury, and we recommend that the 
amount be re-appropriated this year. By way of repairs and so 
forth, the northerly side of the barn has been re-shingled half-way 
to the eaves, which has added much to the comfort of the cattle 
that occupy that side On the southerly side six large doors have 
been made and placed in position to shut off all draughts coming up 
under the barn floor, A spacious and sijfhtly corn barn has been 
built mostly of refuse stock, but so constructed as to present the 
appearance of new material. The hot-air furnace makes the major 
part of the house cellar unfit for the storage of root crops, but the 
superintendent has covered with poles and mulch the cellar where 
the carriage-house stood before the fire, and this has served during 
the present winter as a make-shift for storage purposes. • When 
circumstances will permit the Overseers intend to cover the cellar 
with the building heretofore used as a stable. The question of a 
new, modern heating plant for the house gives the officials no little 
concern. The old plant, always poor and unsatisfactory, has out- 
lived whatever usefulness it may have possessed, and 3hould be 
"scrapped" at the eariiest possible moment. The cost of a new 
plant is so high at the present time, that we can only hope the old 
one will hold out until the cost drops to a lower level. However, 
it is a serious question as to how soon the furnace will be beyond 
repair. At a cost of $100, we purchased a horse for use on the hay 



82 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

rake and other ght work and for driving to town in the winter 
season. It was a good bargain, as the horse is actuary worth 
double the cost. We are not buying milking cows, but are adding 
to our stock by raising all likely heifer calves Ours is grade stock 
of the Holstein variety, than which perhaps there are none that 
give a greater flow of milk. The milk tastes well, never falling be- 
low the standard. There might be more money in registered stock, 
but we have not seen our way^clear to make a beginning. In clos- 
ing let us say that our inventory of tools, stock, produce etc., shows 
an increase over last year, while the net cost per week for care of 
the inmates has been reduced. Considering the unusual conditions 
prevailing in 1918, mostly on account of the war, the Overseen 
render the account of their stewardship with pardonable pride. 

FRANK T. GOODHUE, ) Overseers 

JOHN G. SPERLING, [ of 

CHARLES G. HULL, Ipswich. 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



83 



Report of The 
Sealer of Weights and Measures. 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, 
Gentlemen : — 

I, herewith, submit my report of the Department of Weights 
and Measures for the year ending December 31, 1918. 



7 sealed 


46 


«« 


30 


«< 


8 


«< 


37 


< < 


26 


«« 


3 


<« 


3 


«< 


355 


«« 


41 


it 


13 


<< 


100 


<« 



1 condemned 
1 



Platform Scales over 5000 lbs. 
" under 5000 lbs, 
Counter Scales 
Beam Scales 
Spring Balance Scales 
Computing Scales 
Slot Weighing Scales 
Prescription Scales 
Avoirdupois Weights 
Metric Weights 
Dry Measures 
Liquid Measures 

Gasoline, Oil and Molasses pumps 25 
Yard Measures 17 

Cash received as fees, $73.41, and amount paid to the Town 
Treasurer. 

In the reweighing of 145 articles sold or offered for sale by 
dealers, I found 123 articler over-weight, 2 articles under-weight, 
and 20 articles correct weight. 



1 
5 
1 
1 

81 adjusted 



1 condemned 
3 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



This Department has given considerable time in co-operating 
with the United States Food Anministration in price reporting, and 
inspection work. The complicated forms given out by the Food 
Administration have caused the dealers a great deal of bother and 
misunderstanding. Oftentimes the dealers have complained to me 
about the Food Administration and yet at the same time they were 
always willing to assist me. 

The bakeshops in particular had been sending into the Food 
Administration incorrect weekly reports, as to percentage of sub- 
stitutes and fats used. After making weekly inspections of bake- 
shops, I found that the baker was trying to be honest in his work, 
but the complicated blank form which he was obliged to fill out 
each week were the foundation of all his trouble. After these 
were explained he had no more difficulty. 

The past year has been very trying for the dealer in food- 
stuffs. His expenses have increased, but he must sell within the 
fair price list. He must be correct with all flour substitutes, and 
he must sell his sugar in quantities as prescribed by the sugar reg- 
ulations. Last but not least, he was hounded by the slgar and 
FLOUR HOARDERS, will it not be interesting to see if these same 
hoarders are not the first to give the hand of welcome to Our Boys 
when they return from over-there. 

In many Towns and Cities of Massachusetts the Food Admin- 
istration has been obliged to punish dealers f o violating the Nation- 
al Food Regulations, but Ipswich can be congratulated upon the 
compliance of her Food Distributors with these Regulations. 
Respectfully submitted, 

SV. A. STONE, 

Sealer of Weights and Measures. 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 85 



Police Report 



Board of Selectman, 
Gentlemen ; — 

I beg to submit the annual report of the Police Department 

for the year ending December 31, 1918. As I did not take office 
until after the first of the year, 1919, this report is based on the 
records as turned over by my predecessor. 

Total number of arrests, 211. 

By months— January 25, February 21, March 32, April 20, 

May 10, June 23, July 10, August 5, September 14, October 14, No- 
vember 26, December 11, 

CLASSIFICATION OF CRIME- 

Drunkenness 87 

Gaming 15 

Larceny 1 1 

Breaking and entering 3 

Gaming on the Lord's Day 9 

Non-support $ 

Violation of fish and game laws 1 

Assault and battery 27 

Bastardy 3 

Rape 2 

Violation of labor laws 3 

Not having child attend school 1 

Violation of Town By-Laws 3 

Making threats 1 

Damaging personal property 1 

Manslaughter 2 

Larceny from building 1 

Arrested for out of town police 8 

Operating auto without license 1 

Offering goods for sale without license 1 

Neglect to support children 1 



86 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Fornication 


1 


Trespass 


1 


Forgery 


1 


Abduction 


i 


Lewd and lascivious conduct 


1 


Liquor nuisance 


1 


Breach of peace 


8 


Vagrancy 


13 


Total 


211 


Crimes against persons 


42 


Crimes against property 


16 


Crimes against public order 


153 


Total 


211 


DISPOSITION OF CASES. 




Committed to House of Correction 


34 


Committed to State Institutions 


2 


Fined 


75 


Probated 


21 


Discharged 


16 


Filed 


15 


Appealed 


8 


Suspended 


10 


Defaulted 


2 


Held for Grand Jury 


2 


Continued 


18 


Held for out of town police 


8 



Total 211 

Amount of fines received from the Third District Court, 
$476 21. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD LEAVTT, 

Chief of Police. 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



87 



Tax Collector's Report. 





Collected 


Abated 


Uncollected 








Jan. 19, 1919 


1913 Taxes 






$ 97 33 


1914 " 


$ 96 37 




868 96 


1915 " 


2749 26 


$318 08 


631 08 


1916 " 


8933 50 


686 62 


674 15 


1917 " 


14847 97 


904 35 


5955 77 


1918 " 


107582 78 


299 70 


21372 58 




$134209 88 


$2208 75 


$29599 87 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Treasurer's Department. 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance, January, 1918 $21414 67 

Taxes, 1914 $ 96 37 

" 1915 2749 26 

1916 8933 50 

" 1917 14847 97 

'• 1918 107582 78 

Moth, 1914 25 

" 1915 12 50 

" 1916 21 41 

" 1917 115 15 

M 1918 1759 15 

Department Bills 167 09 

Comm. of Massachusetts, Poor <# 1917 286 60 

Mothers' Aid, 1917 345 67 
State Aid, 1917 2055 91 
Revenue Receipts : 
Comm. of Mass,, Corporation Tax $15062 55 

" - - ■ Income Tax HU8 18136 5o 

" " " " 1917 . 585 00 

" " National Bank Tax 1457 91 

" " Soldiers' Exemption 142 48 

Junk Licenses 150 00 

All other license fees 244 50 

Criminal fines 476 21 

County of Essex, dog licences 391 67 

" rent of Court Rooms 325 00 
Rent of Town Hall 42 50 

Ipswich Mills, police services 720 00 

Fire Dept., receipts, sale of steamer etc. 259 61 
Sealer of Weights and Measures, fees 73 41 

Highway receipts 713 54 

Mass. Highway Commission, Essex Road 

re-imbursement 2601 92 

County of Essex, Essex Road re-imburse- 

ments 2601 92 

Mass. Highway Commission, Turnpike 1918 737 92 

" 1917 4J1 84 

Town Farm receipts 1520 11 

Comm. of Mass., Mothers' Aid 320 67 

" " Tuition State wards 148 95 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



89 



Poor Dept., receipts, individual reim- 
bursements $ 334 20 

Town of Rowley, tuition 2477 00 
Newburyport Gas & Electric Co., right 

of way $25 00 
Gen -Tames Appleton Post, Post 128 

GAR refund 50 

Interest on deposits 894 

Interest on taxes 2272 

All other revenue receipts 1419 



Temporary Loans 

Electric Light Dept., light and power, etc. 
Water Dept., water rates, supplies, etc. 
Electric Light Dept., Note issue 
Trust Fund Income 

Comm. of Mass., Moth re-imbursement 
Cemetery Trust Funds, Mew accounts 

Perpetual care 
Brown School Fund, transportation °/c 



00 
71 
42 
74 
$54897 
90000 
25596 
17525 
2000 
846 
382 
975 
317 
90 



33 

00 
55 
52 

00 
70 
12 

00 
75 
00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Accountant's Warrants : f 

Department Orders .$177007 75 

Temporary Loans 90000 00 

Interest on Temporary Loans 3457 77 

" General Loans 2173 00 

" Electric Light Loans 2384 00 

" Water Loans 8003 00 

Maturing Debt 11100 00 

State Tax 12870 00 

County Tax 9124 65 

Highway Tax 4420 50 

Non-resident Bank Tax 582 47 

Brown School Fund, Transportation 90 00 

Wm J Riley, Treasurer, Trust Funds 846 70 

" " " " " " Perpetual Care 975 00 

Comm. Mass., board of Gas and Electric Light 

Commissioners, exp. 19 78 
Sinking Fund, Water Dept., annual payment 4692 43 

Refunds 66 50 

Balance 



-$331604 58 
$353,019 25 



-$327813 55 
25205 70 

$353,019 25 



90 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



BALANCE SHEET. 


DR. 




Cash on hand 


$25205 70 


Wm J Riley, Collector, Tax 1913 


$ 97 33 


" 1914 


868 96 


" 1915 


631 08 


" 1916 


674 15 


" 1917 


5955 77 


" 1918 


21372 58 


Moth, 1908-'09 


38 71 


" 1911 


2 26 


" 1912 i 


8 36 


" 1913 


54 95 


" 1914 


8 84 


" 1915 


23 05 


" 1916 


129 27 


" 1317 


88 20 


" 1918 


219 58 


Street Sprinkling, 1911 


03 


1912 


10 09 


1913 


14 82 


Electric Light 


1237 84 


Water 


4304 19 


Departmens Bills 


1815 51 


Commonwealth of Massachusetts 


2684 00 


Revenue, 1919 


2928 33 


Overlay, 1916 


148 55 




$43316 47 


Sinking Fund, Water Department 


$112300 28 


Net Bonded Debt 


192149 72 . 




^(UA^ft no 




ipQ\J i ± i ±0\J vw 


Trust Funds 


19213 77 




$392,185 94 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 91 



BALANCE SHEET. 



CR. 

Overlay, 1912 

1913 
1914 
1915 

1917 

1918 

Insurance, Fire Loss 
Temporary Loans 
Electric Light Revenue 
Water Revenue 
Moth Suppression 
Eagle Hill Road 
Essex Road 
Town Farm 
Education 
Shell Fish 

State Guard Equipment 
Water Department 

Refunding Loan 

Central Fire Station Loan 

Burley School Loan 

Electric Light Loan 

Water Loan 

Winthrop School Loan 

Heating Plant Loan 

Water Front Improvement Loan 

State Guard Equipment Loan 

Cemetery Funds 
Kimball Library Fund 
Brown Animal Fund 



Excess and Deficiency 



$ 283 43 


100 19 


117 66 


169 94 


448 20 


893 85 


2104 80 


30000 00 


1237 84 


4304 19 


2343 53 


500 00 


15 91 


325 00 


441 18 


20 00 


951 86 


2520 45 


a»4fi77q fto 


$ 6300 00 


9000 00 


1000 00 


57500 00 


198050 00 


19000 00 


6500 00 


2400 00 


4700 00 

^ftAA^n no 


«pOv^fH>U v/U 


$17812 39 


522 46 


878 92 


$10913 77 


<pii7iilO i l 


$370436 80 


21749 14 


$892,185 94 



n IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

Auditor's Statement. 

I certify that I have examined the accounts of the Treasurer 
and And them correct, and find the balance in the hands of Treas- 
urer to agree with the report submitted. 

I have approved vouchers for all bills paid and find them to 
agree with the warrants of the Treasurur. 

FREDERICK S. WITHAM, Auditor. 



NOTES MATURING 1919. 
Central Fire Station Loan 
Burley School Loan 
Refunding Loan 
Winthrop School Loan 
Heating Plant Loan 
Water Front Improvement Loan 
State Guard Equipment Loan 
Electric Light Loan 
Water Loan 



INTEREST ON DFBT, 

Central Fire Station Loan 
Burley School Loan 
Refunding Loan 
Winthrop School Loan 
Heating Plant Loan 
Water Front Improvement Loan 
State Guard Equipment Loan 
Electric Light Loan 
Temporary Loans, (estimated) 



$1000 oo 


1000 00 


700 00 


2000 00 


500 00 


300 00 


1000 00 


3550 00 


2150 00 

a?19 oftii on 


<pl£,£UU \J\J 


1919. 


$ 395 00 


22 50 


252 00 


760 00 


260 00 


96 00 


210 00 


2284 00 


3500 00 

*7 nn& e;n 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



m 



BONDED DEBT. 




TITLE OF LOAN. 


AMOUNT. 


PAYABLE. 


Central Fire Station 


$ 9CO0 00 


Serially 1919-1927 


Burley School 


1000 00 


1919 




Refunding 


6300 00 


Serially 


1919-1927 


Winthrop School 


19000 00 


i i 


1919-1935 


Heating Plant 


6500 00 


< c 


1919-1931 


Water Front Improvement 


2400 00 


< « 


1919-1926 


State Guard Equipment 


4700 00 


<< 


1919-1923 


Electric Light 


57500 00 


« « 


1919-1938 


Water Notes 


38050 00 


< i 


1919-1936 


Water Bonds 


130000 00 




1924 


Water Bonds 


30000 00 




1927 


Total Bonded Debt 


$304450 00 






Sinking Fund, Water Dept. 


112300 28 






NET BONDED DEBT 


$192,149 72 







TEMPORARY LOANS, 
S N Bond & Co, $20000 00 

First National Bank, Ipswich 10000 00 



Apr. 15, 1919 
Sept. 29, 1919 



94 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Report of Superintendent of Streets. 

Board of Selectmen, 
Gentlemen : — 

I herewith submit the annual report of the Street Depart- 
ment for the year ending December 31, 1918, also an itemized list 
of the property in the Highway Department : 
Team No. 1 worked 420 hours @ $0 75 
Team No. 1 worked 1722 hours @ $0 90 

Team No. 2 worked 390 hours @ $0 75 
Team No. 2 worked 1674 hours @ $0 90 

Single Horse worked 390 hours @ 20%^ 
Single Horse worked 995 hours @ 25^ 



$ 315 00 




1549 80 







$1864 80 


$ 292 50 




1506 60 






$1799 10 




79 95 




248 75 






$328 70 





Total 




$3992 60 


iNFumber gallons of tarvia on streets 


8,900 




Number square yards covered 


37,677 




Cost of same 




$1379 50 


Cost of labor and sand 




266 13 



Total cost of tarvia $1,645 63 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



95 



INVENTORY. 



5 horses 

3 pair double harness 
2 pair street blankets 
2 pair stable blankets 

2 pair storm blankets 

3 two-horse carts 
2 two-horse sleds 

1 two-horse sweeper 

2 road machines 

4 road plows 

12 gravel screens 

2 two-horse shovels 

3 stone drags 

1 two-horse stone roller 
3 road drags 

1 steam roller 

2 scarifier 

2 watering carts 

7 snow plows 

1 one-horse wagon 

1 oil wagon 

1 tar kettle 

1 Ford truck 

1 Albany jack 

1 differential hoist 

Snow fences 

All other tools, etc. 



$1500 00 
175 00 

25 00 
7 50 
7 00 
375 00 
1C0 00 
225 00 
150 00 

30 00 

60 00 

25 00 

15 00 

40 00 

40 00 

1500 00 

400 00 

375 00 

125 00 

60 00 
600 00 

45 00 
350 00 

13 50 

25 00 
120 00 
750 00 
$7,138 00 



Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH A. HUCKINS, 

Superintendent of Streets, 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



List of Unpaid 1918 Bills. 



SELECTMEN. 
New England T & T Co., telephone 



TOWN CLERK. 
Geo G Bailey, M D., birth returns 
E J M Scahill, death returns 



LAW. 
Geo H W Hayes, services 



TOWN HALL. 
C F Chapman & Son, supplies 
C W Brown, supplies 
George Hayes, plumbing' 
John W Goodhue, supplies 
F E Wood, trucking 
Electric Light Dept., supplies 
New England T & T Co,, telephone 



POLICE, 
D A Grady, teams 
Geo G Dexter, photos 



HEALTH. 
E M Dow, carpentry 



S19 37 




*~~ — -— — — - 


$19 37 


$22 25 




21 00 






$43 25 




$50 00 




m ■ — 


$50 00 


$ 2 40 




5 65 




15 97 




2 24 




8 25 




3 85 




1 21 




~— 


$39 57 


$2 00 




7 00 




' — * ~~~ 


$9 00 


$202 84 







$202 84 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 97 



ESSEX ROAD. 






Standard Oil Co., oil 


$80 00 




Electric Light Dept., labor and supplies 


48 20 









$123 20 


HIGHWAYS. 






Wm McCarthy, shoeing 


$31 60 




A I Savory, supplies 


23 18 









$54 78 


OUT POOR. 






A I Savory, supplies 


$6 40 









$6 40 


CEMETERIES. 






E J M Scahill, labor 


$45 00 









$45 00 



Total $593 41 



98 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

List of Town Property. 

School Houses 

Public Buildings 

Public Grounds 

Town Farm 

Cemeteries 

Heard Wharf 

Averoff Wharf 

Turkey Shore Pasture 

Woodland, Linebrook 

Woodland, Common Fields 

Thatch Bank, Great Flats 

Thatch Bank, Third Creek 

Two Gravel Pits, Washington Street 

Gravel Pit, Essex Road 

Fire Apparatus 

Highway Department 

In addition to the property enumerated above, there is the 
shore, beach and other property given to the Town by the Com- 
moners, value of which is not estimated. The valuation of Water 
Works and Eleceric Lighting Plant will be found in the Water and 
Light Report. 



$120,000 00 


40,000 00 


10,000 00 


80,000 00 


5,000 00 


100 00 


3,250 U(J 


1,000 00 


200 00 


75 04 


1,500 (0 


300 00 


15,0^0 00 


7,138 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. W 



Selectmen's Report. 

The conditions during the year 1918 were no improvement 
over the previous year. Supplies were high and difficult to obtain. 
The scarcity of labor made it almost impossible to obtain satisfac- 
tory results. The highways in town have not received the attention 
they should have to keep them in condition. The highway depart- 
ment shows a balance of over $800., not used because we could not 
get the help needed. The special appropriation of $500.00 for the 
causeway to Great Neck was not used for the same reason, but is 
still available and we hope to do this work the coming spring. The 
time is coming soon, if it is not now here, when a change in the 
highway department will be advisable. A small truck, two and one- 
half or three tons, to be used for delivering gravel on the roads 
would be of great advantage and a saving to the town. It will be 
necessary to replace one pair of horses unless this is done in the near 
future. 

The fire department should be motorized at the earliest prac- 
tical time This department speaks for itself. The small fire loss 
the past year is in itself all the commendation that is needed. 

The State Police have notified us that the Town Hall will have 
to be re-wired to conform to a new law. They have also ordered a 
ventilator placed over the stage about 4x18 ft. with drop sides, 
held by a fusible plug, to open in case of fire thereby holding the 
flames and smoke from the main hall. The hall is in need of extensive 
repairs. The walls and ceilings should be repaired and painted, and a 
new floor is almost a necessity if it is to be used for public dancing. 
To stage, while it is not used to any extent, should be refitted with 



100 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

curtains and scenery. This would be an inducement to the young 
people and the schools to stage more local plays and would be of 
great benefit to them. The condition of the hall has not been a 
great credit to the town and we have felt it at some of our patriotic 
meetings the past year. 

For the police department we only wish to say one thing, and 
that is, the Selectmen have not changed their position, or the in- 
structions given the police. The same orders and the same induc- 
tions were given to the former chief as to the present, and any 
credit to be given for carrying out the orders should go to the Chief 
of Police. 

We wish to extend our thanks to all town officials and others 
who have helped us to carry on the work of the town, and particu- 
larly the members of the Public Safety and Liberty Loan Commit- 
tees, through whose untiring efforts Ipswich has been able to go 
over the top in every drive. It would be impossible to mention the 
names of all those who have "done their bit," in this report, but 
we feel that the executive secretary of the Public Safety Commit- 
tee, Mr. H. N. Doughty, who was here, there and everywhere, 
twenty-four hours a day, should have special mention. We thank 
the Lord we had him. 

The preparation of a complete list of the Ipswich men who have 
been enrolled for service in the War is a matter of the greatest impor- 
tance. It is impossible, however, to secure any official roll from the 
U. S. Government at Washington, and years will probably elapse 
before any systematic classification and publication of the records 
will be made. There are no records at the Adjutant General's Of- 
fice in Boston. The lists of the Registration Board at Georgetown 
contain the names only of men who who were inducted into service, 
with no clew to their eventual assignment.. It is difficult, there- 
fore, to secure an accurate and complete list at the present time, 
and yet now is the time to make it. 

By combining the list prepared by the Committee of Public 
Safety, with the lists of the Board of Registration, and adding the 
names of men intimately connected with Ipswich as property owners 
or long summer residence, a fairly complete list has been prepared. 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 101 

This is published now to invite correction and enlargement. 
Errors in the spelling of names and in initials are almost unavoid- 
able. Names may be duplicated and a few have been ommitted 
probably. The Selectmen will regard it as a favor If any one, who 
notes any defect will report the same to the Town Clerk or Mr. 
Frederick S. Witham, the Town Accountant. 

FRANK W. KYES, / Selectmen 

GEORGE E. HODGKINS, [ of 
EBEN B. MOULTON, ) Ipswich. 



102 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



ROLL OF H 



Aitkin, Samuel 
Amoral, Antone 
Amaral, Joe 
Appleton, Fra- cis R Jr 
Arsenault, Theodore 

*Bamfurd, Rodney C 
Barney, Joseph T 
*Bernier, A 
Biers, Phineas 
Bird, Charles S 
Bodosis, Louis 
Bolles. Harold N 
Brockelbank, Charles Ernest 
Broderick, John H 
Brooks, Walter R 
Brown, Elmer E 
Brown, Frederick C 
Brown, Kenneth 
Bruce, Wallace 
Brzezwinsky, John 
Burns, Benjamin F 
Burns, Peter D 

Calivas, Charles 
Campbell, Jeremiah 
Campbell, Walter 
Carey, Jeremiah J 
Chaisson, Victor 
Chaput. Arthur 
Chaput, Walter 
Clark, Leslie S 
Comeau. Clifford I 
Conant, Carl 



Allen, Richard Paul 
Amaral, Jack 
Appleton, Charles L 
Appleton James W 
Arsenault, William V 

Bamford, Robert T 
Beaulier, John 
Biers, David 
Biers, Thomas D 
Black, Jam?s William 
Bodwell, Fred 
Brewczyk, Jan 
Brockelbank, Ralph 
Brooks, Edward C 
Brown, Donald C 
Brown, Emery 
Brown, James W 
Bruce, Floyd R 
Bumpas, Henry W 
Burdzel, Wopiech 
Burns. Joseph F 

Cameron, Chester 
Campbell, Richard H 
Carey, Timothy F 
Cassidy, James 
Chapman, Eugene B 
*Chaput, Paul 
*Clark, James 
Clark. William J M 
Comeau, Henry E 
Conley, Sylvester D 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



103 



Constantine. Arthur II 
Crockett, Eugene A 
Cummings, Lester H 
Cunningham, Lawrence 
Cur ley. James T 
Curtis, George H 

Danforth, Philip F 
Davis, Frederick E 
Davis, Kichard W 
Dick. Evans 
Dodge, Warren 
*Dolan, James F 
Dcrt, Garland C 
Doucette, W'alter J 
*Drapeau, Arthur 
Durand, William 

Eliopoulos, Konstantinos M 
Ellsworth, Charles 
Ellsworth. Edward 
Erickson, Oscar L 

Farley. Theodore R 
Fraser, Walter H 

Gakoruimis, George 
Gallant. Arthur 
Gaudet, James 
Gidney, Elwood 
Gill, Joseph A 
Cillis, Lewis 
Gilmore, William K 
Girard. William E 
Glover, Percy L 
Goodale, Robert L 
Goodhue, Paul R 



Couter, Leon P 
Cronin, Frederick E 
Cunningham, James E 
Cunningham, Thomas J 
Curran, John 



Davey, William M 
Davis Oscar A 
Demore, George H 
Dodge, Walter 
Dolan ChaWes L 
Dondero, Frank W 
Doucette, Elmer D 
Doyle, James A 
Drego, Stephen 

Elkins, William L 
Ellsworth, Carl 
Embinder, Joseph 
Ewing, Havelock 

Fowler, William Jesse 
Frazier, William 

Gallant, Alfred 
Gallant, Joseph S 
Gaudett, Bennie B 
Giles, Charles B 
Gillis, James 
ailmore, George L 
Girard, Walter E 
Glover, John Lamson 
Godin, Omar A 
Goodhue, Charles E Jr 
Goodwin, Charles A 



104 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Gould, Harold W 
Grady, Raymond 
Gray. Stephen M W 
Gwinn, Charles 
Gwinn, Harry E 

Haggerty, Lyman H 
Hall, Clyde 
Harris, Moses J 
Haskell, Harold K 
Haskell, Ralph 
Herchec, Hamil 
Herlihy, Morris 
Hinckley, Ezra G 2nd 
Holland, Henry H 
Homans, Donald E 
Horton. Joseph W 
Howe, Theodore F 
Hoyt, Lydig 
Hull, Charles T 

Irvine. Hazen R 

Jean, Garland 
Jewett, Maynard C 
Jordan, William J 

Kelley, John D 
Kempinski, Jan 
Kilborn. Samuel A 
Kisiel, Michale 
Lakeman, Ross F 
Lauer, George H 
Lavoie, Samuel 
Leavitt, William 
Lemieux, Adrian R 
Lewis. James 
Littlefield, Lawrence 
Low, Arthur 



Gould, Roscoe W 
Grant, George L 
Grout, Walter T 
Gwinn, George H 
Gwinn, Lawrence R 
Harrigan, Eugene 
Harris, Abraham 
Harvey. Henry 
Hay, Clarence L 
Harris, David 
Herlihy. Francis J 
Hills, John Parker 
Hodson, James 
Holmes, Calvin 
Hovalek, George H 
Howe, Theodore C 
Howe, Thomas C 
Hull, Arthur A 
Hull, Edward G 

Jewett, Granville 
Johnson, Henry 
Joyce, Henry S 

Kelly, Charles Merrill Jr 
Kidder, Alfred V 
Kinsman, Willard Quincy 
Klinger, Raymond A 

Lange, Karl L 
Lavoie, Henry 
Leavitt, Edward 
Leet, Albert H 
Lemieux, George A 
Lind, John P 
Lord, Ruisell 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



105 



Mackinney, Herbert T 
Magee. Thomas J 
Mallard Charles A 
Mansfield, John Gran^ 
Manzer, Arthur W 
Marcorelle, Arthur P 
Marks Joseph 
Martel, David T 
*Martel, Joseph L 
Martel, Raymond 
Martel, Wilfred J 
Matheson, George E 
McGinnis, James A 
Mennier Albert L 
.Yiillan Anthony P 
Miller, Charles W 
Millerick, Thomas 
Morgan Frank H 
Morton, Forrest H 
Murray, Edwin P 
*Murray, Russell S 

Nason, Francis C 
Naunczyk, Puniet 
Nevim, Daniel 
Nielepniski Alexander 
Norwood, William Gray 

O'Biien, Patrick J 
Osgood, Robert B 

P*.ige, Edward H 
Parker, John S 
Parsons, Lemuel F 
Pechilis, Anthony V 
Per ley, Sidney H 
Phelps, Henry 



MacLachlin, John C 
Maiing, Harry 
Mallard. Frank W 
Manthorn. Fred 
Maraggioglic, S^lvatore 
*Markos, Anthan N 

artel Arthur R 
Martel, Joseph E 
Martel. Joseph P 
Martel. Truffly D 
Matheson, Eugene 
McGinnis, Charles A 
Mclntire, Everett L 
Mignault, Louie 
Millard, Leslie C 
Miller, Clarence E 
Mitcheil, Frai klin B 
Morgan, Wilfred D 
Moseley, Benjamin P P 
Murray, Joseph H 
niillsted, Arthur 

Nason, Myron F 
Neneno, David 
Newman, Benjamin 
Norman, John E Jr 
♦Nutkje, John N 

Connor, Charles 

*Pappadoyianes, Engel 
Parsons, Dana G 
Peatfield Fred P 
Perkins, Francis 
Perry, Maxine J 
Pickard, Chester H 



106 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Pingree, Allan P 
Player, Alfred H 
Poyner, Alfred 
Prentiss, Walter R 
Prisby, Edward W 
Proctor, James H 
Provencher, Arthur E 

Ranson, Claire N 
Reddy, John C 
Reilly, James D 
Richardson, Warren C 
Riley, William M 
Robichau. Thomas 
Rogers, Llewellyn A 
Romononski, John 
Ryan, James 

Santos, August 
Scahill. Arthur B A 
Scotton, Edward L 
Shaw, Henry 
Smith, George A 
Smith, Julian D 
Souza, Joseph 
Sperling, John G Jr 
Stathopulos, Sotiras J 
Sullivan, Christopher J 
Surrette, Murray 
*Szuka. Michael 



Pingree, Sumner A 
Porrier. Alfred 
Post, George B Jr 
Prescott, Elmer N 
Prisby, Stephen W 
Proctor, Thomas E Jr 



Reddy, Frank A 
Reed, Carl 
Rice, Thomas E P 
Riley, Francis M 
Robbins, William J 
Robichau, Frederick J 
Rollins, Alfred H 
Ross, Francis Cray 

Saunders, Charles T 
*Scahill, Chester A 
Senior, Walter C 
Simms, Clayton L 
Smith, John Cotton 
Soteropoulos George 
Spencer, Daniel 
Spires, Joseph A 
Stevens. Frank 
Surrette, Joseph A 
Surrette, Peter 



Thayer, James A 
Thayer, William G Jr 
Thumocki, Gizicosz 
Tremble, Dana 
Tucker man, Bayard Jr 



Thayer, Sigourney 
Theriault, Archie 
Tozer, Elliott F 
Tucker, Everett R 



IPSWlCd TOWN R3PORT. 



107 



Vera, William J 
Voulgas, Satiros A 

Wade. Alfred E 
Wait, Roy A 
Wallace, Dennison C 
Warner, Wilfred 
Welch, Roy W 
Wells Edward 
Wendell, Daniel S 
Wilkinson, Leo 
Williams, Francis 
Wilson. Henry E 
Wood, Francis A 
Wood, William L 
Woodbury, Carl 

Yablowski, Teofil 

Zaico s Paoset 

Those marked with (*) are deceased 



Ving, Karls S 

Wade, Francis C 
Wallace, Brainard 
Warner, Dennis J 
Webber, Ellery 
Welden, Samuel 
Welsh, Albert F 
Wendell, William G 
Wilkinson, Thomas 
Wilson, Arthur Harold 
Winch, Roger K 
Wood, Lester L 
Woodbury, Arthur E 






108 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



Report of 
Committee on Public Safety. 

The Selectmen of the Town of Ipswich on April 3rd, 1917, 
appointed the following as members of the Committee on Public 
Safety : 
John A. Brown G. Adrian Barker Howard N. Doughty 

Charles E. Goodhue Geo. H. W. Hayes Geo. E. Hodgkins 
Walter E. Hay ward Frank W. Kyes Geo. A. Schofield 

And at a later meeting the following were added to its mem- 
bership : 
W. Quincy Kinsman Thomas \i. Lord James W. Appleton 
Roger S. Warner H. W. Mason M. Charles Arthur 

John William Bailey Luther Wait Eben B. Moulton 

The first meeting of the Committee, held on April 6th, at 
the Town hall resulted in the appointment of committees on Military: 
W. E. Hayward, G. A. Schofield, G. H. W. Hayes; Food Supply; C. 
E. Goodhue, John A. Brown, G. A. Barker; Financial: H. N. 
Doughty, H. W. Mason, G. H. W. Hayes, and the officers: F. W. 
Ryes, Chairman ; Charles E. Goodhue, Secretary; H. N. Doughty, 
Treasurer. Weekly meetings of the Committee were held there- 
after, until June, 1917, when the committee was able to carry on 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 109 

the work through its sub-committees and meetings of the wbole 
committee were heM monthly. At a meeting held April 13th, it 
it was voted that an executive secretary be appointed to attend to 
the detail of carrying out the plans of the committee and H. N. 
Doughty was appointed to that office. 

The activities of the committee were first directed to the 
formation of a military organization, which after continuing unt'l 
October 1917 as a local organization, was mustered into the 
State service as a company of the State Guard under the command 
of Captain Walter H. Hathaway, with equipment, which on the re- 
commendation of the Committee on Public Safety, was purchased 
by the Town. This military organization is still enrolled with the 
State forces and povided the Town with a capable armed and drilled 
force which when occasion arose during the epidemic of influenza 
acquitted itself creditably and proved to be a very real help in that 
emergency. 

In the matter of food production the committee at once took 
steps to stimulate the raising of additional crops, increase the quan- 
tity of poultry and live stock, facilitate the securing of labor for 
production purposes and provide garden space. The executive sec- 
retary was directed to take such action as would secure these re- 
sults, and under his direction a census of crops, poultry and live 
stock was taken; land to the extent of 20 acres was secured, and 
alloted to over 200 gardeners; and as the various Federal and State 
Agencies were created to facilitate this branch of the work the 
committee co-operated with them to the fullest extent. The Food 
Committee planted with money appropriated by the Town a field of 
potatoes, which increased the local supply by 225 bushels. 

Conservation work was carried on by the Woman's Commit- 
tee, the work of which Mrs. Walter E. Hay ward and Mrs. Joseph 
W. Ross had in charge. Under their direction, and in co-operation 
with the State and Federal Agencies, canning and preserving were 
stimulated by means of classes in the Winthrop School. All the 
matters relating to the conservation of clothing and food were 
brought before the citizens of the Town, and excellent results were 
secured by their efforts. 



110 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

The Fuel situation was studied by the committee and steps 
to regulate the supply and protect the citizens as far as possible 
from the dreaded shortage were being taken by the committee, 
when the Federal Fuel - administration took charge of the matter 
and through the State Fuel authorities appointed a Fuel Com- 
mittee consisting of Messrs. Hay ward, Tougas and Garrette, who 
secured excellent results in preventing a serious shortage here. 

The committee co-operated with the Red Cross, the various 
War Relief Organizations, the Liberty Loan Committee, and dur- 
the influenza epidemic was active in securing the aid so much need- 
ed at that time. 

The committee was guided throughout the time it was in 
active work entirely by the desire to further the cause of the United 
States of America by every possible means, and its members feel 
that the war record of the Town is one of which its citizens may 
justly be proud. 

For the Committee on Public Safety, 

H. N. DOUGHTY, Executive Secretary. 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. Ill 



Report of 
The Board of Health for 1918. 



Summary of Expenditures: 

Appropriations. 
Regular appropriation, 
Transfer from Reserve fund 

Excess and Deficiency fund 



Totil Expenditures, 
Unexpended balance, 



$3500 00 




2000 00 




25C0 00 







$8000 00 


$7:^26 04 




273 96 






$8000 00 




expenditures 


will be 



Details of ihese appropriations and 
fonnd elsewhere in this report. 

We ask for an appropriation of $4000 00 for the ensuing year. 

Total number of diseases dangerous to the Public Health 
reported during the year, not including Influenza, 77 , classified as 
follows: 

Chicken Pox, 13 

Diphtheria, 3 

German Measles, 11 

Measles. 19 

Scarlet fever, 13 

Tuberculosis, 5 

Typhoid Fever, 4 

Whooping Cough, 9 

77 



112 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

None of the four cases of typhoid fever reported originated 
here. One, non-resident was infected elsewhere, came to Ipsw'ch, 
and was taken sick here. The other three cases were sent here 
from out of town to the Cable Hospital and under the law had to 
be registered and reported from here. Excep technically, none of 
them were Ipswich cases. 

INFLUENZA 

The pandemic run of influenza with which Ipswich was 

stricken is still fresh in the minds of our people. It was the nearest 

thing to universal pestilence that any one now living has ever 

seen. In its world wide sweep Ipswich early succumbed and in one 

month's time more than two thousand persons were stricken in our 

town. The first case to be recognized was found in ept. 12. The 

disease spread like fire through a stubble field. A canvass made on 

Sept. 30 from house to house after the t:wn had been carefully 

divided into sixteen districts and the canvassers carefully instructed 

how to proceed, revealed 1630 cases. They came along rapidly 

after that and before comparatively normal conditions were 

restored the two thousand mark had been passed. Early in the 

outbreak the facilities of the Cable Hospital were placed at the 

service of this Board for the treatment of pneumonia cases, and 

the hospital was filled to capacity with these cases at the time the 

military camp afterwa ds establisned by the State was opened for 

the out-of-door treatment of both Influenza and Pneumonia. 

It is n t designed in this report to go into details as to how the 

situation which confronted the Board was met and handled. Such 
a report would occupy much more space than is available in a re- 
port of this kind. It is the desire of the Board some time in the 
future to publish a detailed history of what happened and what 
was done, taking events as they occurred in sequence. Abundant 
data is on file in the office of the Board which will be codified so as 
to make the story plain, and it will be a most interesting story. 

Early in the epidemic the Board acting in co-operation with the 
Selectmen and the Committee on Public Safety called on the State 
for assistance. It took the State Department of Health and Militay 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 113 

authorities several days before they could show action in establish- 
ing- a military camp hospital, and the disease was sweeping at a 
rapid rate. The epidemic had really reached its peak at the time 
the camp was established. Its decline was rapid after that. It 
should be borne in mind that the Commonwealth as well as towns 
and cities was working under pressure and it was marvellous that 
it got into efficient swing as quickly as it did. Its coming to the 
rescue was most timely. 

Many agencies and individuals in town gave freely of their 
time a~,d energies. We have not space for telling the story and 
giving individual praise where it belongs, much as we would like 
to do s^. We therefore thank each and every one for what they 
did in helping to check the pestilence. 

There were a large number of pneumonia cases resulting 

from the influenza. The board is without a record of the exact 

number, as the physicians once having reported influenza did not 

understand that it was necessary to report these same cases again 
when pneumonia developed. We have though, a record of all 

deaths from pneumonia. In 1917 between Sept, 'st and Dec. 31st 
there were 4 deaths. In the same period in 1918 there were 34 
deaths. In 1917 the total number was 18, while in 1918 the whole 
numbe was 48. :^o it will be seen that there were about 30 fatal 
pneumonias resulting from the epidemic; not a large number when 
figured in percentages. Up to the 2uth of October more than 2000 
cases had been reported. From that date to Dec. 31st, 272 cases 
were reported, and with the cases that have occurred since Jan. 1st 
of this year, and allowing for cases from the first that for various 
reasons were not reported, it is a conservative estimate that the 
total number will exceed 2500. Ipswich was fortunate that the final 
outcome was not worse than it was. 

The reports of the Agent, Milk Inspector and Director of 
'. hild Welfare follow this general report, 

Respectfully Submitted, 
GEO. E. MACARTHUR, ) Board 
AARON LOK.D, } of 

GEO. W, SMITH, ) Health. 

Ipswich, Feb. 15, 1919. 

Printer's Errata— On Page 112 in report of Influenza eases, 
canvass of cases should read 1030 instead of 1630. 






114 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



AGENT'S REPORT. 

In submitting- my report for the year 1918, I would say that 
during the year I received thirty-eight complaints of existing nui- 
sances, each of which received my personal attention, and orders 
given for their abatement. These cases were followed up to see if 
my orders were complied with and I had no fault to find with the 
manner in which they were carried out, which goes to show that in 
ail cases the parties are willing to abide by the rules of the Board. 

Number of complaints received and investigated 38 

Contagious disease cards posted 95 

Dead animals buried or otherwise cared for 19 

Dogs 3 

Cats 11 

Hens 5 

Respectfully submitted, 

AARON LORD, Agent. 

REPORT OF MILK INSPECTOR. 
In submitting my report for the year 1918 I hardly know 
what to say, in fact there is not much to be said as regards the 
milk situation, for in my inspections and conversations with pro- 
ducers, I find them using every precaution to supply pure and 
wholesome milk, as they say it is their desire and interest, not only 
for themselves, but also to protect the health of the public, and I 
am satisfied from the man ner in which their barns and utensils are 
kept, that cleanliness is their motto and is being well lived up to. 
So much for the milk situation. 

As to the ice cream situation my observation after careful 
inspection of all places where the same is sold, is that they are in a 
clean and sanitary condition. 

Number of milk licenses issued 16 

Number of ice cream licenses issued 17 

Oleomargerine dealers registered 11 

Amount received from all fees $20 00 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE W. SMITH, Milk Inspector. 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 115 



DIVISION OF CrfILD WELFARE— REPORS OF 
THE DIRECTOR. 

The third annual report of the work of this division is here- 
with presented. As is now wall known this work is carried on by 
Miss Martha J. Stewart, and consists of follow up work among in- 
fants and pre-natal work among expectant mothers. There is much 
of detail to this work, too much to incorporate in a report of this 
kind, so that the report will deal only with the salient facts, giving 
some figures for comparison which should make the deductions 
from these facts plain to the average reader. 

Below are given the number of births for the preceding four 
years together with deaths of all infants under one year of age for 
the same period. The story which may be read from these figures 
is an interesting one as it shows a decided drop in infant mortality. 

1915, Births, 138, Deaths, 21 

1916, " 171, " 28 

1917, " 157, " 25 
1818, " 195, " 25 
When one considers that the amount of sickness in 1918 was 

much greater than in the preceding years it is significant that the 
infant mortality was kept down to the actual figures of a year ago, 
and the percentage of deaths mate rially lowered. 

It has been shown during the pa3t year that pre-natal wo^k 
persisently followed out gives promise to become a factor of im- 
portance in lowering the infant mortality rate. Taking the work 
as a whole, in spite of adverse conditions, good progress has been 
made and it would be folly not to continue to go on. It has been 
tentitavely arranged with the State Department of Health to have 
a health week here in March similar to the one held in 1916, at 
which time an instructor from the department will be here, and an 
interesting and instructive course will be given to which the public 



116 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 

will be invited. Full particulars of this Health week will be pub- 
lished soon. 

The Baby Weighing and Measuring Campaign for the Gov- 
ernment given last June was :"n charge of this Division, and I wish 
most heartily to thank everybody whc gave assistance to make the 
campaign a success. 709 chiMren under school age were weighed 
and measured, the results tabulated in duplicate, one set of cards 
sent to Washington and the other set retained in our files here. 

The work for the coming year will follow the general line 
already established, with such additions as the State Department of 
Health may suggest. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE E. MAC ARTHUR, Director. 
Ipswich, Feb. 15, 1919. 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 117 



INDEX. 

PART ONE TOWN REPORT. 

PAGE 

Appropriations and Payments 58 

Assessors' Report 58 

Board of Health Report 111 

Bonded Debt 93 

Cemeteries 52 

Cemetery Trust Funds 60 

Charities 4<) 

Departmental 5 

Engineers' Report 76 

Health and Sanitation 22 

Highway Department 28 

Overseers' Report 78 

Police Report 85 

Protection Life and Property 15 

Public Safety Committee 108 

Recreation 51 

Reserve Fund 57 

Roll of Honor 102 

Sealer's Report 83 

Selectmen's Report 99 

Soldiers' Benefits 50 

Superintendent of Streets Report 94 



118 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT. 



PAGE 

Tax Collector's Report 87 

Town Clerk's Report 71 
Town Officers 3 

Town Farm Report 45 

Town Property 98 

Treasurer's Report 88 

Unpaid Bills 90 

Unclassified 54 

PART II. 

Water Commissioner's Report 1 

Electric Light Report 19 

PART III. 

School Report 1 



TOWN OF IPSWICH. 



T W ENTY-FIFTH 
ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

WATER 

AND 



MUNICIPAL LIGHTING 
COM MISSIONERS 




FOR THE YEAR 1918. 



IPSWICH, MASS.: 
G. A. SCHOFIELD & SON, PRINTERS. 



1919 



/ \ 

(I) $ 

a) w w m 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



OFFICERS OF 

WATER AND MUNICIPAL LIGHTING 

COMMISSION. 



COMMISSIONERS. 
Arthur H. Walton, Chairman, 
Geo. H. W. Hayes, 
William H. Rand, 



Term expires 1921 
"'! 1919 
" 1920 



CLERK. 

Arthur H. Walton. Office, Room 5, Town House 

Office hours from 9 A. M. to 5 P. M every week day 

except Saturday. Telephone 92-R. 



TREASURER. 



William J. Riley, 



Office at Town House 



Manager Electric Light, 

Chief Engineer, 

Line Superintendent, Electric Light, 

Foreman, Water Department, 



Arthur H. Walton 

Edmund A. Russell 

C. J. Dupray 

William P. Gould 



Office of Commissioners, Room 5, Town House 

Meetings held every Friday at 8 P. M. 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



CONSTRUCTION DEPARTMENT. 

PIPE LINE. 

I. LIST OF BILLS AND AMOUNTS PAID FOR THE YEAR 
ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1918. 



PAID TO 


FOR WHAT 


AMOUNT 


William P Gould 


labor 


$1.09 00 


David Low 


<< 


12 00 


Albert Willard 


*t 


14 63 


Chadwick Boston Lead Co 


supplies 


49 51 


S H Thurston 


•> 


12 00 


William P Reilly 


< « 


75 


H Mueller 


§* 


48 00 


John W Goodhue 


«< 


10 39 


Chapman Valve Co 


t* 


35 70 


Crane Co 


i * 


27 30 


F E Wood 


express 


4 97 


William A Rand 


supplies 


11 49 




$335 74 


SERVICE PIPE, 




William P Gould 


labor 


$ 54 63 


Albert Willard 


<< * 


36 00 


Crane Company 


pipe and fittings 


J 77 95 


H Mueller 


<« t* 


15 00 


Lumsden & Van Stone 


<< << 


10 Or 


Walworth Mfg Co 


$t <« 


51 07 


Chadwick Boston Lead Co 


lead pipe 


78 27 


National Meter Co 


meters 


3 li 


American Express 


express 


4 71 



$430 74 



WARER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



PAID TO 


FOR WHAT 


AMOUNT 


MAINTENANCE. 




William P Gould 


labor 


$1073 02 


C J Dupray 


« i 


1 50 


J H Sheppard 


<< 


1 50 


Chas Parsons 


<< 


53 51 


Albert Willard 


a 


127 90 


v\ alter Coleman 


<< 


2 07 


Orrin Leno 


< < 


10 S5 


Frank Conte 


<< 


25 44 


F P Frazier 


it 


16 50 


Joseph Robicheau 


<t 


8 26 


Electric Light Dept 


" 


215 47 


V E Rust Jr 


< i 


13 25 


George Hayes 


i < 


11 6§ 


D A Grady 


teams 


$2 50 


Walworth Mfg Co 


supplies 


39 44 


C F Chapman & Son 


< i 


1 80 


Wm P Reilly 


oil 


5 85 


Geo L Gilchrist Co 


supplies 


15 11 


Electric Light Dept 


use auto 


:32 25 


Joseph A King 


repairs 


9 05 


F E Wood 


teaming 


10 61 


Edw Nutting 


labor 


■3 38 


A J Brennan 


supplies 


50 


Crane Company 


<< 


47 40 


J J Merrill 


< < 


4 59 


American Express Co 


express 


8 10 


Manzer & Damon 


repairs and supplies 


119 79 


Nellie Sullivan 


labor 


12 77 


1 W Goodhue 


supplies 


2 15 


Canney Lumber Co 


lumber 


25 


Lunkenheimer Co 


supplies 


3 29 


William P Edgerley 


labor 


143 62 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



PAID TO 


FOR WHAT 


AMOUNT 


G P Anderson 


repairs 


$ 2 50 


G W Knowlton Rubber Co 


supplies 


7 86 


Geo A Schofield 


insurance 


20 70 


Chas L Lovell 


supplies 


4 20 


Geo H W Hayes 


ribbon 


50 


Austin L Lord 


repairs 


26 28 


H M Dillon 


supplies 


93 45 


Shawmut Chemical Co 


< < 


16 50 


Damon & Damon 


insurance 


50 07 


Mutual Boiler Ins Co 


t < 


40 00 


Cotton & Woolen Mfg 


a 


50 00 


G H W Hayes 


bond 


25 00 


Ipswich Chronicle 


printing- 


88 50 


N E T & T Co 


telephone 


24 51 


B J Conley 


supplies 


40 


H M Messerve 


a 


5 01 


George Hayes 


i i 


1 00 


A J Wilkinson 


< < 


3 60 


C S Tyler 


<< 


1 50 


John H Brown 


labor 


19 50 


S G Todd 


rent land 


2 00 


Buffalo Meter Co 


books 


2 60 


J H Lakeman 


postage 


62 80 


Electric Light Dept 


pumping 


3000 00 


A A Jewett 


bookkeeper 


312 00 


Geo A Schofield 


commissioner 


25 00 


William H Rand 


«» 


100 00 


Geo H W Hayes 


<< 


100 00 


Arthur H Walton 


<< 


75 00 


Arthur H Walton 


clerk and manager 


487 50 


Geo A Schofield 


«< a a 


100 00 



$6,864 86 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



NOTE PAYMENT. 
Notes paid by Treasurer $2150 00 

INTEREST. 

Interest paid various parties by Treasurer $8003 00 

SINKING FUND. 
Appropriation $4692 43 



8 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



II. RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR THE 
ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1918. 



YEAR 



Receipts 



Balance Dec. 31, 1917 $ 629 27 
Water Rates, 16694 22 

Services, 273 63 

Appro. Note Payment 2150 00 
Misellaneous receipts, 190 6S 
water, 321 99 

Insurance Dividend, 45 00 



Total, 



$20,304 79 



Disbursements. 



Maintenance, 
Services, 
Pipe Line, 
Interest, 
Note Payment, 

Total, 
Cash balance, 

Total, 



$6864 86 

430 74 

335 74 

8003 00 

2150 00 

$17784 U 
2520 45 

$20,304 79 



III. BALANCE SHEET FOR YEAR ENDING DEC. 31, 1918. 



Bonds issued, $160U00 00 


Engineering, $ 3350 00 


Notes outstanding, 38050 00 


Land damages and 


Premiums on bonds, 10412 58 


rights of way. 3599 12 


" notes, 60 75 


Pumping Station, 14425 24 


Appropriations, 33224 20 


Pumps and machinery, 19637 65 


Misc. receipts, 165 43 


Storage Basin. 27693 59 


Water rates, 268105 95 


Bull Brook supply, 1778 60 


Filter appro. 143 28 


Distributing reservoir, 17827 56 


Appro, notes payable, 11889 25 


Pipe Line construction, 125192 62 




Service Pipe " 21961 §4 




Store House, 178 70 




Miscellaneous, 2834 20 




Cost of construction, 238482 12 




Interest on bonds, 157664 20 




Maintenance, 88318 17 




Material and supplies, 1671 62 




Water Rates due and 




unpaid, 4201 17 




Services due and unpaid, 103 02 




Sinking Fund payment, 29090 69 




Cash balance, 2520 45 


Total, $522,051 44 


Total, $522,051 44 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



9 



TV. SUMMARY OF COST OF CONSTRUCTION TO DEC. 31, 1918 



Construction Account. 


Dec, 31, iyi7 


Year 1918 


Dec. 31, 1918 


Engineering- 


$ 3350 00 




$ 3350 00 


Land damage & rights of way 


3599 12 




3599 12 


Pumping Station 


14425 24 




14425 24 


Pumps& pumping machinery 


19637 65 




19637 65 


Storage Basin 


27693 59 




27693 59 


Bull Brook Supply 


1778 60 




1778 60 


Distributing reservoir 


17827 56 




17827 56 


Pipe Line construction 


124750 68 


$444 94 


125195 62 


Service Pipe construction 


21831 61 


127 23 


21961 84 


Store House 


178 70 




178 70 


Miscellaneous 


2834 20 
$237909 95 




2834 20 




$572 17 


$238482 12 


V. SIN] 


KING FUND. 


Receipts. 




Investments. 



Appropriation 


1895 


$170J 00 


<< 


1896 


1759 50 


n 


1897 


1899 08 


«< 


1894 


1965 55 


<« 


1899 


2032 00 


•< 


1900 


2138 65 


a 


1901 


2363 50 


a 


1902 


2446 22 


it 


1903 


2531 84 


a 


1904 


2680 32 


tt 


1905 


2890 91 


a 


1906 


2986 47 


a 


1907 


3084 00 


it 


1908 


3418 34 


<t 


1909 


3656 61 


tt 


1910 


3671 99 


From profits 


1911 


3784 78 


«« 


1912 


3901 40 


tt 


1913 


4022 17 


n 


1914 


4146 45 


tt 


1915 


4276 52 


a 


1916 


4410 42 


tt 


1917 


4549 00 


Appropriation 


1918 


4692 43 


Interest 




37059 96 


Profit on bonds 




232 22 




$112,300 28 



Ipswich Savings Bank $ 120 42 
Ipswich Water Loan 55050 00 
Ipswich Elec. Lt. noter 24400 00 
Ipswich Town notes 5900 00 

111. Central R. R. 3%s 3000 00 
First National Bank 1329 86 

Liberty Loan Bonds 22500 00 



$112,300 28 



10 WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



REPORT OF GEORGE H. W. HAYES, TREASURER OF THE 

SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS OF THE 

WATER DEPARTMENT. 



I beg to submit the following report : 




The following amounts were received on account of the prin- 


cipal of the below numbered notes : 




Maturing debt No. 24 Electric Light note 


$ 100 00 


No. 40 


100 00 


No. 53 


100 00 


No. 68 


250 00 


No. 74 


100 00 


No. 126 


J 00 00 


No. 11*2 


100 00 


No. 8 to 20 Water Notes 


500 00 


No. 45 


250 00 


No. 117 


400 00 


No. 123 


250 00 


2 Water Front Improvement Loan 


300 00 


Temporary Loan 


10000 00 


Sinking Fund 


4692 43 



$17,243 43 

The following amounts were received for interest on the 
below numbered Notes : 

Water Front Improvement Loan, Notes Nos. 2 and 3 $ 12 00 

Electric Light Notes 14 to 20 70 00 

21 to 24 40 00 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 11 



24 




$30 00 


26, 27, 28 




60 00 


34, 35 




40 00 


44, 45 




40 00 


40 




32 00 


53 




84 00 


74 




36 00 


126 




38 00 


132 




4C 00 


Water Notes 68 




85 00 


m 




184 00 


123 




95 00 


45 




80 00 


45 




80 00 


8 to 20 




130 00 


8 to 20 




130 00 


Water Front Improvement Loan, 


Notes Nos. 2 and 3 


12 00 


Refunding Debt Notes 


59 to 66 


112 00 




59 to 66 


112 00 


Electric Light Notes 14 to 20 




70 00 


26, 27, 28 




60 00 


34,35 




40 00 


40 




30 00 


44, 45 




40 00 


132 




38 00 


123 




90 00 


Water Notes 8 to 20 




130 00 


45 




80 00 


68 




85 00 


117 




184 00 


Temporary Loan 




300 00 


Liberty Loan, First Issue 




50 00 


First Issue 




58 12 


Second Issue 




200 00 


<< <« 




200 00 


<< n 




212 50 



12 WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 

Ipswich Water Bonds, 36 Coupons $720 00 

Illinois Central Railway, 6 Coupons 105 00 



Total $4,179 62 

The following memoranda was received from 
the Town Treasurer. 

"Interest on E. L. 126 $36 00 

74 34 00 

53 32 00 

144 40 00 

24 28 00 

21-24 40 00 



$210 00 

Memoranda of Checks held out to sffcet dupkcate 
payment onJApril 1, 1918." 

Total amount received on account of principal $17242 43 

interest 4179 62 



$21,422 05 

The department invested $10,000.00 in the Fourth Liberty 
Loan, and $2,000.00 in Note of Electric Light Department, No. 144, 
ot par. The Department also invested $9,750.00 plus $17.78 accrued 
interest, or $9,767.78, in the purchase of ten $1,000.00 Ipswich 
Water Bonds, which mature July 1, 1924. I believe that more of 
these Bonds can be purchased at about this price and would advise 
investing of the Sinking Fund in such Bonds. 
Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE H. W. HAYES, 

Treasurer of Sinking Fund. 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 13 



Superintendent's Report. 



To the Board of Water Commissioners : 

Gentlemen :— Following is the report for the year ending 
December 31, 1918. 

MAIN PIPES. 

The number of feet of mains laid to date and sizes are as 
follows : 

14 inch 1,505 

12 inch 10,963 

10 inch 8,830 

8 inch 17,897 

6 inch 81,746 

4 inch 3,708 

2 inch 9,920 

1 inch 2,070 

Total, 136,659—25 miles, 4,659 feet. 

STREET GATES. 

Total number now set is 1 57 

HYDRANTS. 

They are in good working order, the total now set is as fol- 
lows : 

Town 179 

Private 15 

Total 194 



14 WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 

SERVICE PIPES. 

Six services have been added this year. Total number ser- 
vices connected with the works to date, 1060. 

Following is an account of the number of services added, al- 
so the number of feet of service pipe laid (by years) since the works 
were put in : 

Total 

Ft. In. 

7,241 6 

11,363 8 

5,008 2 

2,288 

2,430 10 

2,177 

3,382 6 

1,726 9 

4,237 3 

2,389 2 

630 7 

1,615 8 

687 5 

1,612 5 

1,179 11 

990 2 

1,584 

617 4 

517 6 

876 

408 7 

597 7 

628 5 

397 10 

218 9 

25 1060 24,598 7 30,099 9 54,748 4 
Total. 54,748 feet, 4 inches*- 10 miles, 1,948 feet. 
The service pipes are cast iron, lead and galvanized iron from 
3-4 inch to 4 inches. 





No. ser 


Town 


Private 


Year 


vices added 


Ft. 


In. 


Ft. 


In. 


1894 


181 


4,470 


4 


2,771 


2 


1895 


218 


5,312 


3 


6,051 


5 


1896 


110 


2,391 


9 


2,616 


5 


1897 


32 


896 


6 


1,991 


6 


1898 


42 


1,112 


7 


1,318 


3 


1899 


34 


841 


2 


1,335 


10 


1900 


30 


641 


o 


2,741 


4 


1901 


25 


517 


4 


1,209 


5 


1902 


25 


580 


1 


3,657 


2 


1903 


19 


800 


1 


1,589 


1 


1904 


17 


367 


5 


263 


2 


1905 


30 


1,172 


7 


443 


1 


1906 


22 


454 




233 


5 


1907 


49 


986 


9 


625 


8 


1908 


38 


715 


3 


464 


8 


1909 


31 


653 


5 


336 


9 


1910 


35 


765 




819 




1911 


15 


345 


5 


271 


13 


1912 


13 


328 


8 


188 


10 


1913 


16 


526 




350 




1914 


15 


262 


5 


146 


2 


1915 


25 


451 


9 


145 


10 


1916 


19 


374 


3 


254 


2 


1917 


12 


225 


5 


172 


5 


1918 


6 


116 




102 


9 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



15 



SYNOPSIS OF THE PUMPING RECORD FOR THE YEAR 
ENDING DECEMBER 31. 1918. 



1918 


Total pumping 


Total number gallons 


Average num- 






of water pumped per 


ber gals, water 




time per month 


month 


pumped per 

day 


Month 


Hrs. | 


Min. 


Gallons 


Gallons 


January 


258 




12,942,60« I 


417,503 


February 


269 




13,626,150 


486,648 


March 


222 


45 


11,162,025 


360,065 


April 


239 




12,120,675 


404,022 


May 


240 




12,180,450 


392,918 


June 


250 




12,871,200 


429,040 


July 


264 


30 


13,847,775 


446.702 


August 


237 


15 


12,346 425 


398,272 


September 


191 


30 


9,942,525 


331,418 


October 


"181 


30" 


--9,304,-500 


300,145 


November 


161 


15 


8,320,650 


277,355 


Decembor 


166 




8,927,025 


287,969 


Total for year 


2680 


45 


137,592,000 




Daily average for year 






376,964 



Estimated amount of coal consumed during the year, 198 
tons, 325 pounds. 



16 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



METERS. 
Total number of meters in use as follows : 



NAME. 


Sizes. 




3 in. 


2 in. 


1 l-2in 1 in. 


3-4 in. 


5-8 in. 


Total 


Crown 


4 


9 


4 


5 




42 


64 


Empire 








1 




57 


58 


Hersey 








3 




34 


37 


Lambert 




1 




2 




20 


23 


Niagara 






1 




55 


14 


70 


Nash 








5 




209 


214 


Union 












1 


1 


Worthington 








2 




11 


13 


Columbia 












2 


2 


Elevator 












2 


2 




4 


10 


5 


18 


55 


392 


484 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 17 



Treasurer's Report. 

WATER DEPARTMENT, TOWN OF IPSWICH. 
SVILLIAM J. RILEY, TREASURER. 

DR. 

To cash on hand, January, 1918 $ 629 27 

To amounts received : 
Fixture rates 
Meter rates 
Miscellaneous water 
Service Pipe supplies 
Construction 
Insurance dividend 
Note appropriation 
Miscellaneous 



CR. 



By paid : 
Commissioners' orders 
Notes 
Interest 



Balanue, January, 1919 



The Treasurer has the following bills for collection ; 
Fixture rates $1761 81 

Meter rates 2099 96 

Construction 63 94 

Little Neck 339 40 

Miscellaneous 49 08 

$4,304 19 



6811 95 


9882 27 


45 69 


205 10 


68 53 


45 00 


2150 00 


466 98 

ton qfM 70 


$£U , ovM t y 


$7631 34 


2150 00 


8003 00 


$17784 34 


2520 45 


—$20,304 79 







™ Ss y y y 


jCCO^-^.jSio^co 




K 




y CO y co oco y CO 




<D 


CTj ~ ^ - - <• • - - - <• - •% - -~ -rt >!H >r< 


C3*~| c3~i c3 ~i C3"^| 




+2 


rH — OuCO 

CO CM rtf 

_r o o o 


cu oc cd co cd go cu oo 




c3 


— r—l -p-p-U 


o o o o 




>>v A- - - - - - - - - s. -. ^ CICRCDlO ^W |jO |jiO ^ 




S 






P cs oiai05^<Defe a;w-(iJe/9-a) 




1 


1-2 ^ i— 1 — 1 r— . 


^* t^i ^i K*i 




|C OOlOCDOOiXi|>XOiCO^t>050CiOG 


LO OC t- CO 






.ocoHiX'ai-^'^TTrioimoLO^cM- re 


T CO «— 1 C\J 


■ 


. lHHHr-7r-i-,-H-i t— 1 — r-H r— ' > ■ 


«""* »-•* 


(/) 


S-h I i i i -iii ii i Cft <Ji <X> 

Q) r-t r— , rH CO £ rO O^ OO i— 1 




,£} — O CvJ 70 "^^ IOU7 lO 




Q 


S3, CO 53 




Z 


O !M ~ — T-H 


*— 1 r— i— 1 i— 1 


o 


— 1 






0) | ^LOicc-t-050oo:co"*t't>t--ooooo 


CO ^ lO CD 




00 


3 


QC5 7. OJOiCi Z: O O O- C C- O O O i— I •— • — 


»— < r— . - — ,— 1 


CO 

I— ( 


oooooocx)ooooa5aic7iJiaic. asaiaiCiOiC^ 


O^ Gi OS (Ji 


AND 


O 


H-.^^HH^nHHOOeq -< 03 CO _ _ ^ 


_r - «-T „; 


0) 

+-> 
03 

Q 


~ d d d d Jbjbj^? u y o+j > o >-p'-p-p 

l_ 3 h -3--2l-3l--D--5'--3-»QQQOZQZOOO 


+j 6 6 >> 
a a; <D c\3 

O Q Q ^ 




0) 












"^'^■^^•^^•^irJ'r^^rjiTf-f'sr-rf'^rr 1 '^ 


t}< "^ ^ ^ 




tf 






(0 










+-> o O ^OOOOOOOOO 


o o o c 


[y 


u 


G OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 


UD o o o 


lO 


^ ooooooocooooooooiolo 


t- O 00 lO 


o 


h 


o o o o — h'lo cnTcocd t— i t— i ^r co"-^ cm i-TcrTco t> 


co t^ oo -^r 


00 


£ 2^^ 






O 


<J <^- 


w 








z 










. . -»J . -4^ . -M . +J . . 


-l-> 






a o. ft a 


a 






CD CU 0)0) 


0) 


X 




Q: Q: Q q: : : : : fl 


p : t : 




* ' Sh * 5h ' 5-. ' Jh C ' 


j-i 






<X> CD CD 0) >» 


0» 


l±j 


PQ 


43 -l-> -U +J j 


c3 <• «• <• 


h 


t Brothers 

und Ipswich W 

ris & Co. 

und Ipswich W 

Co. 

und Ipswich W 
recorded 
und Ipswich W 

Savings Bank, 
Trust Funds 


^ " 


< 


Q 




^ 


H 


'5 


5 


£ 


a 




o 


i— i 

g s : 3 








fe 


• 




ce^ S S "§ S * S > § 


'£ z z z 






k^Hgo £cV2 <1cQ2;a> feO 


m 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 



19 



Electric Light Department. 

CONSTRUCTION EXPENSES. 



PAID TO 


FOR WHAT 


AMOUNT 


The following bills have been paid for 


construction during 


the year 1918 ; 






C J Dupray 


labor 


% 84 51 


J H Sheppard 


n 


62 69 


Jos A King 


«< 


2 00 


A J Brennan 


<< 


60 


Ipswich Mills 


<< 


1 50 


F E Wood 


express 


20 08 


American Express 


< t 


3 38 


J J Merrill - 


labor and supplies 


231 94 


Pettingell & Andrews 


supplies 


673 73 


General Electric Co 


< < 


476 74 


R V Pettingell 


<t 


13 75 


Walworth Mfg Co 


n 


14 18 


J W Goodhue 


u 


1 55 


Wetmore & Savage 


1 1 


145 00 


New Eng Tel & Tel Co 


labor and supplies 


11 14 


B&MRR 


freight 


28 41 


A H Walton 


expenses 


10 14 


Geo W Bryant 


auto truck 


600 00 



$2,381 34 



20 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 



DR. CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT. 


CR. 


To balance, 1917 $ 825 42 
To Depreciation appro. 2450 00 
To sale of note 2000 00 
To cash, Private en. 36 20 


By bills paid 
By balance 


$2381 34 
2930 28 


$5,311 62 


$5,311 62 



COST OF CONSTRUCTION. 






Dec. 31, 1917 


Year 1918 


Total 


Cost of Real Estate 
Cost of Steam Plant 
Cost of Electric Lines 
Cost of Electric Plant 


$ 8117 19 

16431 J 8 

73363 23 

9994 74 


$2367 54 
13 80 


$ 8117 19 
16431 18 
75730 77 
10008 54 




$107,906 34 $2,381 34 


$110,287 68 



NOTES AND INTEREST. 



Interest paid 1918 by Treasurer 
Notes " " " 



$2384 00 
3450 00 



DR. 



NOTE INDEBTEDNESS. 



CR. 



To notes outstanding 

Jan. 1, 1918 
To note authorized 

in 1918 



$58950 00 

2000 00 

$60,950 00 



By notes paid 1918 $3450 00 

By balance outstanding 
Jan. 1, 1919 57500 00 



$60,950 00 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 



21 



Manager's Report. 

To the Water and Municipal Lighting Commission. 
Gentlemen : 

I submit the following report of the receipts and expenses of 
the Lighting Plant for the year 1918. 

MAINTENANCE. 



PAID TO 



FOR WHAT 



AMOUNT 





LABOR. 


Edmund Russell 


Engineer 


F W Fiske 


<« 


Geo E Brown 


«« 


Geo L Fall 


<< 


Enoch Olmstead 


Fireman 


R B Pickard 


« < 


Fred C Rust 


«( 


Wm P Edgerly 


«< 


C J Dupray 


Electrician 


J H Sheppard 


€t 


Total 






FUEL. 


Castner, Curran & Bullitt 




Co. Inc. 


coal 


New Eng. Coal & Coke Co. 


(« 


Spring Coal Co. 


it 


Atkinson Coal Co. 


«< 


E B Townsend Coal Co. 


ft 



$1410 93 


1217 92 


1253 32 


1151 10 


1029 28 


991 38 


1061 37 


800 71 


1000 81 


865 36 


$10,782 18 


$ 222 83 


457 18 


533 45 


3676 72 


861 12 



22 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 



PAID TO 


FOR WHAT 


AMOUNT 


Northern Coal Co. 


coal 


$2039 37 


H N Hartwell & Son 


< i 


1108 12 


Ipswich Mills 


1 1 


b26 54 


Geo Fall 


■ i 


6 88 


B &MRR 


freight 


5165 65 


John A Brown 


use of track 


46 50 


Rees Jenkins 


teaming coal 


652 58 


James H Sheppard 


< < » . 


744 21 


Libie J Wood 


< < < « 


57 00 


WmE Garrette 


trimming 


2 50 


Wm l A Walton 


* « 


99 01 


Harry Ward 


§* 


48 00 


Edwin F Smith, Jr 


t * 


2 On 


Frank Perkins 


4 t 


6 26 


D A Grady 


use auto 


1 00 


A H Walton 


money paid out 


10 90 


Total 




$16,569 82 


MISCELLANEOUS. 




G A Schofield 


Insurance 


$308 08 


Damon & Damon 


< < 


273 60 


G A Barker 


<< 


664 62 


Cotton & Woolen Insurance 


100 00 


M C McGinley 


" (med. att.) 


4 50 


Ames Iron Works 


repairs steam plant 


115 10 


Geo W Knowlton 


<< (i < < 


28 06 


CS Tyler 


< < (i << 


11 22 


Providence Eng Co 


< « < < t* 


40 00 


Albert Russell & Sons Co 


• < c< << 


10 58 


General Electric Co 


" electric " 


14 63 


Albert Russell & Sons Co 


tf < < « « 


38 50 


Joseph A King 


< < c< a 


7 00 


C F Chapman & Son 


station supplies 


27 '77 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 



23 



PAID TO 


FOR WHAT 


AMOUNT 


Geo Hayes 


station supplies 


$ 1 09 


Shawmut Chemical Co 


a (( 


29 70 


Garlock Packing Co 


a a 


19 54 


E Howard Clock Co 


<< (t 


10 00 


F E Wood 


i - < . 


30 78 


A G Osborne 


oil and waste 


708 49 


C F Chapman & Son 


< < << 


8 05 


Mayer & Porter 


auto supplies and 


repairs 82 77 


E E Currier 


< « i < ( % 


58 03 


Hammatt Street Garage 


« 4 < < { t 


10! 94 


Jos A King 


i I ( < ii 


1 95 


W C Henderson 


-ii a a 


1 50 


C J Dupray 


< i < i a 


3 50 


J H Sheppard 


> < t < 1 1 


5 19 


Geo W Bryant 


auto 


125 00 


Ipswich Chronicle 


printing 


133 05 


N E T & T Co 


telephones 


43 26 


Municipal Lighting Asso 


dues 


10 no 


J H Lakeman 


postage 


63 18 


Pettingell, Andrews Co 


supplies 


348 87 


J W Goodhue 


• < 


43 18 


R W Davis 


< t 


4 15 


C F Chapman & Son 


<< 


2 30 


Geo B Brown 


< « 


5 40 


J J Merrill 


< ■ 


19 05 


Hobbs & Warren Co 


books 


13 43 


Measures Co 


< < 


30 


J A Huckins 


labor 


35 00 


Henry Lavoie 


1 1 


3 38 


Orrin Leno 


<« 


72 


Jesse Jedrey 


< < 


60 


H Meserve Co 


supplies 


1 50 


Mass Highway Com 


auto 


4 06 


Robinson News Service 




1 00 



24 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 



PAID TO 


FOR WHAT 


AMOUNT 


Geo A Schofield 


cash paid 


14 00 


American Express 


express 


3 02 


A H Walton 


cash paid out 


18 52 


A A Jewett 


bookkeeper 


312 00 


Geo A Schofield 


commissioner 


25 00 


Wm H Rand 


a 


100 00 


Geo H W Hayes 


it 


100 ( 


A H Walton 


a 


75 00 


Geo A Schofield 


manager and clerk 


100 00 


A H Walton 


4. m*i a 


487 50 


Total 


$4,778 56 




JOBBING DEPARTMENT. 




J H Sheppard 


labor 


$104 66 


C J Dupray 


it 


1)3 10 


Pettingell, Andrews Co 


supplies 


23 75 


American Express 


express 


1 37 


Stewart Howland 


supplies 


8 40 


McKenney Weterbury Co 


it 


40 05 



$291 33 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 



25 



DR. MAINTENANCE. 


CR. 


To bal. Jan. 1, 1918 $ 6701 62 


By bills paid 1918 


$32130 56 


To sale of current 21376 19 


Less old bills due 




To sale steam power 300 > 00 


Jan. 1, 1918 


1680 06 


To Ins. dividend 120 45 


By bal. in favor of Dept. 


To miscellaneous 65 00 


Jan. 1, 1919 


5297 46 


To rent of poles 148 80 






To amt. due for light 1103 62 




• 


To amt. received for coal 354 27 






To amt. due miscellaneous 60 00 






Transfer from Excess and 






Deficiency Fund 4041 13 






To coal on hand 2137 00 






$39,108 08 


$39,108 08 


DR. JOBBING DEPARTMENT. 


CR. 


To bal. profits to 


By bills paid 1918 


$291 33 


Jan. 1, 1918 $3285 49 


By old bills due 




To cash for labor and 


Jan. 1, 1918 


70 52 


material 495 64 


By bal. in favor of Dept. 


To bills due 74 36 


Jan. 1, 1919 


3493 64 


$3,855 49 


$3,855 49 



26 MUNICIPAL LIGHT- REPORT. 



Treasurer's Statement 

ELECTRIC LIGHT DEPARTMENT, TOWN OF IPSWICH.. 
WM. J. RILEY, TREASURER. 

DR. 

To cash on hand January, 1918 $715 55 

To amounts received : 
Commercial Light 
Town Buildings 
Jobbing 
Power 

Insurance Dividends 
Rent of Poles 
Miscellaneous 

Depreciation Appropriation 
Note Appropriation 
Interest appropriation 
Note Issue 
Transfer from Excess and Deficiency Fund 

$3992) 68 



7747 87 


647 27 


375 55 


5981 05 


120 45 


148 80 


575 56 


2450 00 


3450 00 


2384 00 


2000 00 


4041 13 



$40,637 23 



CR, 
By paid : 
Commmissioners' orders $34803 23 

Notes 3450 00 

Interest 2384 00 



$40,637 23 

The Treasurer has the following bills for collection ; 
Commercial Light $1025 43 

Power 78 19 

Jobbing 134 36 

$1,237 98 







oooo o o ooot)fH5-iJ-iJ-iSH5-(5HjH 






cc 


G G fi £ Cc CGGG >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 






o> 


• •—1 ._ •!— 1 «rH "r— 1 ,^ ,F— ••"" ' *■"" ' * ,— ' 






• 1— < 


coooHo>Hu:oi-HMWt-^coo^ g g g g g g g g 






*$_, 








+J 


7505<3ia}Q<Jia5(j505<J)05C505050500000000 






t— I t— It— It— 1 rH H r- IHr- (^Ht— IHt- IHr- IOOOOOOOO 






cS 


«^C5 00ONCDONf WHOOtMOdddddc'd 






9 


HNHH(NNNCCMMMWHIN~*00000000 






Ci<J5Ci<Ji<Ji<J?<Ji<J5C5<J5C5CiC5<JiC5'— IHHHH- « t— 1 *-■» 












CO . 

ro w cq w tn tc m m cc m k co ai m ., m .,.,.,,, m „, 
















-4-J 

o 
• 


ooooooooooooooooooooooo 






flcGflc^flcaccrtcccCflCflCflGC 










■ 

z 

< 


o 






0)1 


COCOCOW^^iCCDt^OOJ50CaO(MCOWrt"^^C'00 




o 


2 


OOOOOOOOOOO — « T— It— 1 •— I^Hr- lr— lr- 1 r- IHH 




GO 


csasaiaiOsaiai^cscsasiji-JiaiCsaiCiO-iJs^icrsa^as 




W 


>—• rH r— (rHr- lr- 1 »^ r— I - - t— 1 t— 1 i— 1 r— lr— 1 t— 1 T— It- It- 1 — r— H - 1 .— I 




-1 




^ ^ • »s »» •». -s *.«^*v^^»s»^^ 






o 


„ ~ lO >nio ioiOOlOO o^°OOOCOO 












<D 


. . . • " 'i* . ^ .a»a)cu<D . . .a>a>a>a>a><Da)a; 
o o a a> a) a) * ^ddddyy^daSSSSdi 




X 


4-> 

a' 












■^'^r'rti"^'^r'^ , rr'^^) , -^ 1>: T^''~t 1,: T T "3 1 T^-TfTFT'T'Tr 




^ 


oooooooooooooooooooooc o 


o 




fli 


ooooooooooooooooooooooo 


o 




3 


OOOOOOOOOOOOLO^OO^lOCOCOt-OOOO 


lO 




o 




t> 


o 


6 

< 


€/> 


68- 


X 








\- 




. . -4-> . +-> . . -i-> . . . 4-> . -t-> .4-3 . +-» 






a a a a a a a 




o 




CD 0) 0) 0) 0) 0) <D 






Q Q Q Q C Q Q Q^ : : : : 




id 




ater 
ater 

ater 

ank 

ater 
Lyn 
atei 

ater 

ater 










_l 
LJ 






Q 


:a Savings Bank . 
n Savings Bank . 
g Fund Ipswich W 
n Savings Bank . 
g Fund Ipswich W 
ton Savings Bank 
of Massachusetts 
g Fund Ipswich W 
ery Trust Funds 
Avenue Savings B 
n Savings Bank . 
g Fund Ipswich W 
lent Savings Bank, 
g Fund Ipswich W 
h Savings Bank 
g Fund Ipswich W 
e A. Schofield 
g Fund Ipswich W 

i < a i 
(< « « < 








15 




4-> 

O 
















'»•' rri •!— • itt •!— < •■— i <d •■— < *•» j_i i-rt "- 1 •■"-" rr •■— ■ « •!— < 








■ 






1 






O^MSi»BQQSo^SSfeWMwOS 


1 



28 MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 



Manager's Report. 

The following- table shows the income receipts and the outgo 
payments of the Department for the year ending December 31, 
1918, as they apply to the method of ascertaining the cost of street 
lighting for the year. 

OUTGO. 



Maintenance bills paid 




$32130 56 


Interest on debt paid 




2384 00 


Depreciation appropriation 


INCOME. 


2450 00 
$36,y64 56 


Sale of light and power 




$23859 75 


Miscellaneous receipts 




688 52 


Inventory coal on hand 




2137 00 
$26685 27 



$10,279 29 

This excess of expenditures over earnings represents the 

amount which by the State law is charged against street lighting- 

and includes as will be noticed both the interest and depreciation 

appropriation. No direct appropriation is made for street lighting- 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 29 

This balance divided among the street lights give the following cost 
of each street light for the year 1918 ; 

790 lamps each burning 40 watts one year $11 28 each 

19 " " " 300 " " " 70 00 " 

This year we are required by law to include in the tax levy an 
amount for street lighting, which will include depreciation, interest 
and note payments to be credited by the department as a receipt, in 
the same manner as if received from private consumers. I would 
recommend $12.00 a light for our 40w lamps and $75.00 for our 
300w lamps which will amount to $10,905.00 and that such amount 
be raised and appropriated this year for that purpose. 

The following table shows the number of services and also 
the amount of sales each year since the start : 

Sale of Gurrent 
Year No. Services and Power 

1904 69 $ 3605 53 

1905 105 7076 77 
19)6 131 &330 68 

1907 170 7462 43 

1908 195 9010 34 

1909 218 9178 64 

1910 269 10594 48 

1911 323 12159 42 

1912 362 14557 45 

1913 435 16131 8# 

1914 477 17380 33 

1915 521 19559 41 

1916 591 19497 04 

1917 652 21975 77 

1918 648 23859 75 

This year has been rather a hard year, not only for our plant 
but for everything in general. The increased cost of coal, supplies 
and labor, and the loss caused in the change of time for six months 
of last year, made it necessary to increase our rates in June from 



36 MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 

1(V to 12^ per k w hour ; even at that rate the rec3ipts were not 
sufficient to pay the expenses. 

I felt that beginning with January, 1919 another increase in 
the rates was necessary and the Board voted to increase the rates 
from 12^ to 14^ per k w hour, less 10% if paid on or before the 20th 
of the month. 

The question of purchasing' electric current will again come 
before the Town at our annual town meeting and it a question 
which should be carefully considered . There is no doubt in my 
mind that in the near future power is going to be in demand, in 
fact if we had the proper current we would be able to increase our 
power load. Under the existing conditions of our plant if we 
changed over two of our engines we would meet with no better re- 
sults than at present. To me there is but one of two things to do 
to care for the future, that is either a install a new unit of 300 k w 
capacity, or purchase our current. If you can judge the future by 
the past I am thoroughly convinced that it is much cheaper to buy 
than to generate, and I feel that it would be cheaper to buy electric 
current than to install a new unit at the expense of approximately 
$30,000 as in the near future, unless we purchase the current w e 
will be required to install such unit. 

About the ownership of our plant. There are many who 
think if we buy current the town will lose its plant ; the ownership 
is not to be considered whatsoever because by buying our current 
we do not relinquish the ownership of our plant, the only question s 
to be considered are shall we buy or shall we generate ? The town 
will care for its distribution in the future as it has in the past. I 
do not wish to be misunderstood in this matter, I have investigated 
to some considerable extent and feel that the town should buy their 
current provided that the price is right. 

I wish to express my thanks to all connected with the depart- 
ment for their assistance, also to the former manager for his assist- 
ance and information rendered, and I feel that he will give me 
any further information I may ask of him in the future. 

ARTHUR H. WALTON, Manager. 
January, 1919. 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT, 31 



Commissioners' Report, 

To the Citizens of Ipswich : 

The Municipal Water and Light Commission submit their 
annual report for the year ending December 31, 1918. 

WATER DEPAATMENT. 

The expenditures for the year 1919 are estim&ted to be as 
follows : 

For Interest Payment $7917 00 

For Sinking Fund 4840 88 

For General Expenses 6000 00 

For Hydrant Service 2237 50 



Total $20,995 38 

The Board recommends that the amount for hydrant service 
be raised and appropriated from the tax levy and the balance be 
taken from the earnings of the Water Plant. 

The question of purchasing electric current Will come before 

the Town at our annual town neeting, and if the town should 

decide to purchase current we believe pumping of water should be 

done by electricity and would recommend the installation of an 

electric pump for that purpose. 

ELECTRIC LIGHT DEPARTMENT. 

This year we are required to appropriate direct by taxation 
an amount to be charged for our street lighting and town build- 
ings. We would recommend that $12.00 a light for our 40w lamp s 



32 MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT. 

and $75.00 a light for our 300w lamps to be raised and appropriat- 
ed, this would make 

790-40w lamps @ $12.00 $9480 00 

19-300w lamps @ $75.00 1425 00 



Total $10,905 00 

From this amount will be charged depreciation $3150., inter- 
est $2284., note payment $3550., as required by statute. 

As the various departments have included in their recom- 
mendations appropriations for electricity to be used by their de- 
partments, we recommend that a sum not to to exceed $895.00 be 
raised and appropriated by the various departments for electricity 
to be used in the town buildings. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE H. W. HAYES, 
WILLIAM H. RAND, 
ARTHUR H. WALTON. 



AUDITOR'S STATEMENT. 

This is to certify that I have examined the books and ac- 
counts of the Water and Electric Light Department, and of the 
Treasurer of the Sinking Fund and find them correct. 

FREDERICK S. WITHAM, Auditor. 
Ipswich, Feb. 6, 1919. 



tloton of Spstottf). 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



CHOOL COMMITT 




FOR THE YEAR 1918 



Charles G. Hull, Printer, 
8 Cogswell Street, Ipswich, Mass. 

1919. 






^ 



ORGANIZATION OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



Chairman, 



Herbert W. Mason 



Finance and Budget, 

Herbert W. Mason and William J. Riley 

Text Books and Teachers. 

Herbert W. Mason and Dr, G, E. MacArthur 

Buildings and Grounds, 

Luther Wait and Joseph W. Ross 

Improvement and Insurance, 

Luther Wait and Joseph W. Ross 



School Physician, 
School Nurse 



Dr. George E. MacArthur 
Martha J. Stewart 



Attendance Officer, 
Clerk of the Board, 



George W. Tozer 
George W. Tozer 



Superintendent and Purchasing Agent, 

Joseph I. Horton 



Office, 
Office Hours, 



Manning School Building 
School Days from 3.30 to 5.00 



EDUCATION. 



General Expenses. 

Joseph I. Horton, superintendent $1949 98 

George W. Tozer, clerk 6 1 02 

George W. Tozer, truant officer 75 00 

George W. Tozer, census taker 49 98 

Ipswich Chronicle, printing 50 25 

Charles G. Hull, printing 304 40 

J. H. Lakeman, postage 38 99 

Measures Co., Inc., supplies 35 

Bernard L. Goss, printing 4 00 

New England T. & T. Co., telephone 99 42 

George E. MacArthur, M. D., physician 300 00 

Charles O. Bishop, boat hire 2 00 

D. A. Grady, auto hire 8 00 

Joseph I. Horton, cash paid out 30 74 

John P. Marston, cash paid out 2 50 

American Railway Express Co., express 23 90 

Measures Co., Inc., supplies 4 1 

Ernst Hermann, services 1 38 30 

Library Bureau, supplies 43 70 
Coburn Charitable Asso., services welf are nurse 150 00 

M. Bennett, supplies 4 95 

Brown-Howland Co., supplies 4 70 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Boston Index Card Co., supplies 1 10 

F. E. Wood, trucking 23 21 

Dimond-Union Stamp Works, stamps 2 20 

Mrs. J. C. Stone, flags 2 00 
iVfass. High School Athletic Asso., membership fee 2 00 

H. B. McArdle, supplies 1 30 

People's Express Co., express 32 

B. J. Conley, supplies 25 



$3927 66 



Teachers' Salaries — Day School. 

John P. Marston 1220 00 

Helen M. Anderson 610 00 

Louise M. Marsh 7 1 3 00 

Mary Weeks 360 00 

Olive Sullivan 300 00 

Mary W. Sullivan 360 00 

Gwendolyn Taggart 267 75 

Mildred Emerson 5 70 00 

Amy B. Lindsey 660 00 

Elizabeth C. Ferguson 700 00 

Gertrude P. Twombly 187 50 

Herbert W. Pickup 700 00 

Helen E. Sanby 300 00 

Elizabeth M. Wood 320 00 

Elizabeth P. Lewis 320 00 

Edna M. Rowell 280 00 

Laura L. Cole 260 00 

Lois V. Savage 340 00 

Georgia L. Blaisdell 340 00 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Alice K. Lockwood 640 00 

Katherine F. Sullivan 960 00 

S. Isabel Arthur 766 75 

Leroy W. Jackman 65 1 25 

L. Eva Stearns 624 00 

Emma Bell 640 00 

Eva A. Willcomb 620 00 

William Murphy 356 25 

Ethel W. Archer 510 00 

Marian P. Webster 550 00 

Carrie L. Bowman 360 00 

Hazel M. Weare 600 00 

Marguerite Houlihan 570 00 

Lucy Ardel Kimball 675 00 

Annie P. Wade 650 00 

Elizabeth A. Caldwell 560 00 

Grace A. Bowlen 240 00 

Frances Trussell 240 00 

B. Miriam Bryant 562 50 

Winfield W. Lunt 720 00 

Grace Higgins 330 00 

Nellie T. Sullivan 740 00 

Winifred M. Fleming 640 00 

Lydia S. Harris 640 00 

Martina E. O'Neil 640 00 

Arthur H. Tozer 500 00 

Lilian M. Mackinnon 528 75 

Cora H. Jewett 320 00 

Hilda J. Schofield 140 00 

Arthur W. Gould 93 32 

Myrtle H. Cunningham 60 00 

Hazel Barstow 1 5 00 

Mrs. J. P. Marston 2 50 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT 



Beatrice Johnson 
Anna C. Parziale 
Katherine C. Baker 
Mrs. George F. Durgin 
Daisy Ehler 
Frances Quinlan 
C. H. Striley 
Beatrice Pedrick 
Flattie Brown 
Mrs. J. V. Hubbard 
Augusta Greenache 
Annie Bailey 
Ernst Hermann 



5 00 


16 36 


1 25 


6 25 


15 00 


15 00 


39 00 


15 00 


7 50 


27 50 


6 00 


27 00 


110 00 


25244 43 



Teachers' Salaries — Evening SchooK 

Helen E. Sanby 30 00 

Katherine F. Sullivan 45 10 

Nellie T. Sullivan 45 1 (J 

Leroy W. Jackman 68 00 

Winifred M. Fleming g 45 1 

Lois V. Savage 36 00 

Annie P. Wade 43 10 

Mrs. J. P. Marston 6 00 

Ruth Joyce 2 50 



320 90 



Text Books and Supplies. 

Ginn & Company 81 30 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Milton Bradley Co. 369 88 

N. E. Retail Grocers 4 Asso. 10 00 

D. C. Heath & Co. 10771 

Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 1 23 79 

Edward E. Babb & Co. 34 1 4 1 

Zaner & Bloser Co. 6 70 

Ipswich Historical Society 6 00 

The Macrnillan Co. 3 63 

Benjamin H. Sanborn & Co. 53 74 

Little, Brown & Co. 2 12 

Doubleday, Page & Co. 1 1 3 

j. L. Hammet Co. 683 32 

John C Winston Co. 2 1 5 

American Book Co. 119 91 

Allyn & Bacon 2 48 

G. P. Putnam's Sons 1 50 

Charles Scribners' Sons 22 26 

Etta M. Jordan 5 25 

Barnes & Noble, Inc. 41 40 

Review of Reviews 10 50 

The Outlook Co. 1 5 00 

Silver? Burdett & Co. 6 84 

Kenny Bros. & Wolkins 1 78 25 

The Prang Co. 8 05 

Canney Lumber Co. 233 67 

Measures Co., Inc. 1 1 25 

Electric Light Dept. 1 00 

A. J. Wilkinson 16 12 

Ipswich Mills 3 85 

Chandler & Barber Co. 20 1 7 

William H. Field Co. 2.90 

C. S. Tyler 20 

R. B. McKimCo. 14 05 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



New England Reed Co. 

N. J. Bolles 

Titcomb & Co. 

C O. Abell 

Farley. Harvey & Co. 

Hiller & Co. 

C S. Tyler 

Houghton & Dutton Co. 

Oliver Ditson Co. 

C. Howard Hunt Pen Co. 

H. B. McArdle 

Royal Typewriter Co. 

Remington Typewriter Co. 

L. E. Knott Apparatus Co. 

Wright & Ditson 

Leroy Phillips 

Manifold Mfg. Co. 



7 00 


49 31 


1 31 


42 00 


71 36 


28 39 


2 20 


2 25 


74 84 


5 11 


113 56 


150 00 


249 00 


81 67 


14 36 


4 50 


75 



3414 14 





Transportation. 




D. A. Grady 




1102 25 


Walter K. Chapman 




320 00 


Michael Ryan 




97 00 


Bay State St. Ry. Co. 




438 40 



1957 65 



Janitor Service. 



Fred B. Saunders 



970 00 



10 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 

Thomas A. Howe 
Wm. H. Bodwell 
George W. Tozer 
Wm. J. Wallace 
Mary E. Saunders 
Mrs. M. Ryan 
L E. B. Perkins 
Wm. F. Rutherford 
Howard Blake 
Cora H. Jewett 
B. R. Horton 



Fuel and Light. 



Lathrop Bros. 
A. H. Peatfield 
Charles L. Lovell 
George Fall 
Samuel C. Gordon 
Ipswich Mills 
Irving Manzer 
D. S. Perley 
Appleton Farms 
George M. Adams 
John A. Brown 
James R. Small 
Electric Light Dept. 



251 72 


246 73 


130 09 


105 00 


22 50 


83 00 


170 00 


120 00 


141 00 


18 00 


7 00 



2265 04 



455 80 


530 20 


876 67 


580 75 


165 10 


10 74 


35 00 


81 50 


591 00 


75 00 


14 00 


5 00 


60 72 



5481 48 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



11 



Buildings and Grounds. 

E. G. Damon, carpentry 38 47 

Arthur W. Gould, carpentry 69 95 

Wm. H. Bodwell, carpentry 57 16 

Manzer & Damon, carpentry 24 85 

J. J. Merrill, services and supplies 37 45 

George W. Hills, painting 7 58 

I. E. B. Perkins, labor 1 42 

Austin L. Lord, masonry 1 06 45 

W. E. Bassett, supplies 52 06 

Reuben Andrews, painting 78 16 

Wm. A. Banfill, painting 3 00 

A. J. Brennan, plumbing 1 74 70 
Stone-Underhill Heat. & Vent. Co., services 561 04 

J. H. Hardy, carpentry 1 00 

Wilfred C. Dun, labor 7 50 

George Hayes, plumbing 98 56 

Wm. H. Rand, plumbing 54 I 1 

R. L. Purinton, plumbing 9 53 

Canney Lumber Co., lumber 71 66 

Reformatory for Women, flag 6 1 

C. F. Chapman & Son, supplies 4 55 

Wm. P. Reilly, supplies 40 

Mass. State Prison, supplies 27 83 

C. S. Tyler, supplies 2 88 

Thomas Hollis & Co., supplies 3 75 

Masury-Young Co., supplies 59 70 
Middlesex County House of Correction, supplies 63 

Peabody Anti-Dust Co., supplies 6 25 

Water Dept., water 183 99 

John W. Goodhue, supplies 192 53 

H. W. Phillips, supplies 73 50 



12 IPSWrCH SCHOOL REPORT. 



T. H. Perkins, trucking 35 1 4 

F. E. Wood, trucking 25 20 

Joseph A. King, repairs 7 82 

W. Stowe, supplies 25 00 

Wm. A. Mitchell, cleaning vaults 63 00 

T. C. Thurlow's Sons, Inc., supplies 28 80 

Charles L. Lovell, lime 4 85 

Walworth Mfg. Co., supplies 3 73 

Ipswich Mills, supplies 2 50 

Arthur C. Damon, supplies 4 75 

Samuel C. Gordon, labor and teaming 590 1 1 

Standard Electric Time Co., repairs 8 23 

F. R. Schaller, piano tuning 15 50 

G. C. Fiske, supplies 4 48 



Furniture and Furnishings. 

John F. Wippich, repairs 

Kenney Bros. & Wolkins, supplies 

Daniel Reid 

W. C. Bates Co., piano 

Arthur C. Damon, supplies 



2636 77 



6 25 


81 58 


27 00 


50 00 


46 18 



211 01 



Rent. 

Nettie R. Johnson 5 00 



5 00 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



13 



Diplomas and Graduating Exercises. 

Dr. Lemuel J. Murlin. services 25 00 

C. S. Tyler, ribbon 4 20 

Prudential Trust Co., 38 20 



67 40 





Insurance. 




Cogswell & SafFord 




36 80 


G. A. Barker 




205 95 


E. C. Brooks, Agt. 




31 25 


Damon & Damon 




143 35 


George A. Schofield 




364 65 



Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



Balance from 1917 

Appropriation 

Appropriation 1917 unpaid bills 





782 00 




46313 48 
441 18 


215 61 

46500 00 

39 05 


46754 66 



46754 66 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



To the Citizens of the Town of Ipswich: — 

The School Committee desires to record its approval of the 
two-session plan for the High School, and has recommended to 
the Superintendent that the sessions be continued on that 
basis. 

The attention of the citizens is called to a plan that has 
been established in the High School, known as the Councilor- 
Teacher plan, whereby each teacher is to give particular atten- 
tion to a specified group of students, and to whom these stu- 
dents are to turn for advice in regard to their courses of study 
and plans for future educational training. It is hoped that by 
means of this arrangement the students will be able to avail 
themselves more readily of the experience and knowledge of 
the teacher, and on the other hand, the teacher, having as- 
sumed a degree of responsibility for the development of certain 
specified students, will be able by advice, and if necessary by 
the use of stronger methods, to keep the students alive to the 
need of keeping their work up to the standards required for 
securing the benefits of the High School training. Parents and 
guardians of students in the High School can help very mate- 
rially in the proper development of this plan by consulting 
frequently with the teacher under whose supervision the 
students in whom they are particularly interested are placed. 

Physical training in the schools is being developed, and the 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 1 5 



School Committee believes that this branch of the work should 
gradually be made more effective. 

The appearance of the school grounds has been greatly 
improved, and the Committee desires to maintain them in such 
a condition that the school yards will always be considered as 
an ornament and not a detriment to the appearance 
of the town. Consideration is being given to the 

need of straightening the back line of the property on Central 
Street in order to give more play room out doors in the rear of 
the school buildings. 

It is very strongly urged that parents and guardians of the 
students in the schools keep a careful watch on the school 
work, and that any matters needing attention be reported at 
once to the proper school authorities. The School Committee, 
and all others who are connected with the schools in any official 
capacity, are most anxious that the schools of Ipswich be made 
the best that is possible with the resources the town has avail- 
able for educational purposes, and we ask the co-operation of 
all citizens of the town to that end. 

The School Committee appreciates the work done during 
the year by the Superintendent, Principals, Teachers, and Offi- 
cers, and with a full realization of the difficult^ s that have been 
overcome, congratulates them on the progress that I as been 
made. 

The careful perusal of the report of the Superintendent and 
other officials is earnestly requested. 

Respectfully submitted for the School Committee of Ips- 
wich by 

Herbert W. Mason, Chairman 
Dr. George E. MacArthur 
Howard N. Doughty 
William J. Riley 
Luther Wait 
Joseph W. Ross 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the School Committee of the Town of Ipswich, 

Gentlemen: — 

I herewith submit the following report of the 
conditions of our schools for the calendar year just closed. 
This is the seventeenth annual report coming from the office of 
the Superintendent, and, in addition to the usual financial state- 
ment, and general survey of the schools as a whole, it will con- 
tain the subsidiary reports of supervisors and of those acting as 
heads of departments. 

This has been a most trying year for schools and school 
officials. Never before in the history of this country, have such 
imperative demands been made upon them; never before have 
such requests been answered so fully and completely. Our 

colleges, our fitting schools and our high schools, have res- 
ponded most nobly to every call and have given most gener- 
ously of their best and most promising young manhood. 

Our own schools have suffered but little in this respect, as 
most of our pupils were too young to join the regular forces on 
the firing line or in the various camps. We have suffered, how- 
ever, from another cause, which in a measure, was preventable; 
and that is the headlong rush of pupils into industrial lines of 
work. The abnormal wages caused by the shortage of labor 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 1 7 



and the urgency of supplying the war's demands, proved too 
strong a temptation to many of our young people who with- 
drew from school, to engage in work which for the moment 
seemed to them to be more profitable. The shrinkage in the 
enrollment last year for the whole State amounted to 1 8 per 
cent. That this figure will be greatly exceeded this year is the 
settled conviction of those best qualified to judge. 

In a great majority of cases this means a permanent with- 
drawal from school and educational opportunity, and forces 
these unfortunate youth into the ranks of unskilled labor. In 
later years they will realize their mistake and be filled with life- 
long regret. 

The whole movement was an economic blunder and we 
are still blundering. Thousands and thousands of boys might 
have been better employed in the work of the schools. This is 
a stubborn fact and it will remain for years to come. We have 
made a tremendous loss in intelligent, capable, self-governing 
manhood, which is bound to manifest its seriousness more and 
more as time goes on. This is the one fact that I wish to estab- 
lish in the minds of this community: That the breaking away 
from school work and school influences has entailed a loss that 
this community and this nation can ill afford to bear, and that 
we must strive by all means to recover as much as possible of 
the ground we have lost. 

Owing to the causes already mentioned, there was a con- 
siderable shrinkage in the enrollment of the Junior and Senior 
Hi^h Schools. Neither did the upper grades escape in this res- 
pect. Pupils completing the work of the fourth grade and 
having reached the age of fourteen years, demanded labor certif- 
icates which we were compelled by law to give them. 

But this was not the end of our troubles. The epidemic of 
influenza cost us just one month of school time. We have been 
losing nearly an hour each day on account of poor car serv.ee. 



18 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



The habitual truant has been much in evidence and the at- 
tendance officer has been obliged to spend a good portion of 
his time in returning these boys to school. In a few instances 
the parents have shown hostility to, and a defiance of the law. 
In such cases we have been obliged to institute legal proceed- 
ings against them. 

With a better understanding of the spirit which prompts 
school attendance, and a more thorough knowledge of the re- 
quirements of school and labor laws, we may look for a marked 
improvement in this respect. To further this end we shall em- 
body in this report such abstracts from our school and labor 
laws as have a direct bearing upon this phase of the subject 
and it is hoped that they may receive that careful consideration 
to which they are justly entitled. 

The lack of parental control has become very noticeable of 
late years. The child goes to school, or remains at home, or with- 
draws from school altogether, just as the whims' rikes him. In some 
cases he is absolute master of the situation. Neither arguments 
nor entreaties nor threats avail anything. He chooses his own 
road and is determined to walk therein. When the authorities 
intervene, the parents in too many instances take sides with the 
child to his lasting injury. This ought not to be so. The 

parent and the teacher must cooperate more closely if the child 
is to receive the benefit of right training. In this connection let 
me say that this matter has assumed such proportions that it has 
become a significant contributory cause of reduced attendance, 
especially in the Junior and Senior High Schools. 

There is another matter to which I wish to call the attention 
of the parents; and that is the tendency of our undergraduate 
pupils to complete their education in some out-of-town business 
college. Let it be understood at the outset that I make no crit- 
icism on the well-established commercial schools. They are 
doing a good work and are worthy of public confidence in 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 1 9 



every respect. They give the most practical and up-to-date 

commercial training to be had anywhere and our merchants and 
shopkeepers depend upon them for clerical help. But our pu- 
pils need first of all the broader preparation of our High School 
before attempting to specialize. They will find that a High 

School diploma is a very valuable asset, and will assist them in 
many ways toward securing positions and an advance of salary. 

I regret to say that some of our pupils who "flunk" in their 
work have not the requisite moral courage to return to school 
and repeat the subject in which they failed. We are trying to 
offer a good commercial course in our High School, and we 
feel that we are prepared to give up-to-date instruction and 
save tuition expense at the same time. To bear out this state- 
ment let me say that one of our pupils was wise enough to dis- 
cover this fact for himself. He returned to this school and is 
doing good work at no cost to himself or his parents. 

The foregoing is intended to show the need of the cooper- 
ation and good judgment on the part of*parents and pupils and 
teachers. Let us never forget that the pupils in these schools 

are passing through the period of adolescence, the most critical 
and important period of their existence. It is the time when 

the you l h receives impressions, good or bad, most easily. It is 
the period of character formation, when they should be sur- 
rounded and impressed by the highest and noblest ideals and 
be guided by some good, firm counselor, in whose judgment 
they have confidence and are willing to follow his advice. The 
street, the shop, and the saloon do not furnish the best environ- 
ment for such growth. The help of the church, the home, and 
all other good influences should be invoked in behalf of these 
young people that their lives may be given the right trend and 
direction whose end should be a more intelligent citizenship ca- 
pable of a larger service. The training of our youth during 
this critical stage should not be left in their own hands, and we 



20 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



cannot escape the condemnation, by shifting the responsibility 
to their shoulders. It is our work; and if it is done at all, we 

must do it. 

But better days are at hand. The United States Govern- 
ment is unwilling that its greatest potential asset — our young 
boys and girls — should not be properly prepared for responsi- 
ble citizenship. The Employment Service recently organized 
is about to grapple with this problem, and is making an effort 
to establish a closer relationship between school and work. In 
all its branch offices is to be found a Vocational Counselor 
whose duty will be to handle all boys under eighteen who seek 
"work. In case the boy shows no special aptitude he is ordered 
back to school and he is obliged to go back- On the other hand, 

where there is an evident trend or taste for a certain kind of 
work, the boy is placed in a position that will really advance 
him industrially. He is not allowed to take a "blind-alley" job 
that leads nowhere, as so many boys have done in the past. 
1 he boy who tries a dozen different jobs in as many months* 
time starts upon his career with a severe handicap and gives 
himself a very undesirable classification. 

The fundamental aim of this service is to reduce the ranks 
of unskilled labor, and to save our boys from becoming useless 
driftwood — the flotsam and jetsam of society. This shows the 
evident drift towards paternalism; and those of us who are pos- 
sessed of an independent spirit, must regretfully admit that the 
social and political power of the individual is rapidly passing. 
The State is becoming more powerful day by day; the individ- 
ual is shrinking. 

The reason for this transfer of power is not far to seek. 
The indifference and disregard of the individual shown tow- 
ards the most sacred obligations has forced the government into 
this line of conduct. If the individual will not assume this 

resposibility then l}\e government must take it up as a matter 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 21 



of self-protection. If parents cannot be induced to cooperate 
with local agencies to secure the desired results, then the gov- 
ernment will take up the work, and it has taken it up. 

In spite of all the trying and irritating conditions that have 
hedged us about in our work this year we have all endeavored 
to pursue the even tenor of our way; and, in simple justice to 
those whose loyalty and fidelity in the work of their chosen 
calling have been so largely instrumental in achieving the suc- 
cess of our schools, I rejoice to say that the results attained are 
very satisfactory indeed. 

We were very fortunate in securing a corps of good teach- 
ers. To be sure some few of them were without experience; 
but they know the subject matter they are teaching, are enthu- 
siastic in their work, are improving in discipline, and are well 
liked by their pupils. 

On the whole the town is to be congratulated on the char- 
acter and quality of its teaching force. Many of them have 
been with us for years; their names have become household 
names and are always mentioned in terms of warmest appre- 
ciation and regard. And best of all they richly deserve it. 

The primary grades at the beginning of the fall term were 
in a crowded condition and that remained true until recently. 
Forty pupils of this age are too many for one teacher to handle; 
but the scattered homes and impossible distances which these 
little folks would be obliged to travel to one central school, 
make any such change out of the question. Again, this element 
of our school population is changing each year. We would net 
be justified in recommending the removal of one of our vacai t 
school buildings to some central location. These children are 
at present all comfortably housed, and our only problem has 
been to decide between a slower rate of progress for these pu- 
pils and the doubtful experiment of centralization. 

The results of the change in the age limit of admission to 



22 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



the public schools from 6 to 5 years, instituted a year ago, have 
become apparent and are producing the desired effect. Our 

fifth grade which heretofore has been accommodated in two 
rooms, was found to be too large for its original quarters and 
so at the beginning of the fall term the overflow was domiciled 
in the Payne School. The increase of membership in this 

grade shows that these pupils are getting an additional year's 
schooling before going to work, and gives us the material for a 
closer grading. 

The work in the other schools below the Senior High, has 
been along the ordinary lines, and despite the many interrupt- 
ions, the usual standards have been maintained. In view of 
changes lately instituted in the Senior High School, I feel that 
the work we are attempting to do here deserves something 
more than a general statement, and this fuller treatment I shall 
reserve for another place in this report. 

In addition to the regular routine work of the schools, it 
may be of interest to those who read school reports, to offer in 
condensed form a list of some of the special activities, com- 
plete and incomplete, in which the schools have been engaged 
during the past year. 

Physical Training. 

In response to the general appeal from Boards of Educa- 
tion, State and National, and the repeated recommendation of 
our local school officials the subject of physical training was in- 
troduced into our school curriculum during the spring term of 
last year. We were fortunate enough to secure the services of 
Prof. Ernst Hermann who has been connected with Harvard 
University for some time and who also has charge of the work 
of this department in the schools of Somerville and Newton. 
He is thoroughly equipped for the work and imparts no small 
portion of his energy to his classes. There has been a very 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 23 



noticeable toning up of the physical condition of our pupils 
since the work was begun and we feel assured that it has been 
a step in the right direction. These exercises are given every 
day in all the schools* In the grades the teacher super- 
vises the work and gives the instruction. In the Junior and 
Senior High, the boys and girls conduct the exercises in sep- 
arate rooms, under the direction of some leader selected by the 
teacher, who simply supervises the work. All are obliged to 
take part unless excused by the school or family physician. 
Such excuses are rare as all seem to enjoy the work. The in- 
centive to leadership, the development of a genuine school 
spirit and of self-control are not the least among the many ex- 
cellent results of this indispensable training. 

Art Exhibits. 

During the year the Public Library has become a member 
of the Library Association and is thereby entitled to receive on 
an average of once a month a set of pictures illustrating some 
phase of art. These vary in subject matter from reproductions 
of the old masters to the mere photographic illustrations of 
some modern industrial activity or process, and furnish a very 
valuable means of educating our pupils along these various 
lines. 

Through the courtesy of the Library Trustees and the 
hearty cooperation of the Librarian, we are permitted to place 
these pictures along the halls and corridors of our two principal 
school buildings where they are allowed to remain for a week 
or ten days. This offers great advantages to our pupils along 

cultural lines. They can become acquainted with the great 
masters and learn to appreciate their works. All true art is 
inspiring and ennobling and uplifting. A good picture appeals 
duectly to the best that is in us; and it seems impossible that 
the companionship of these works, briet thougn it be, should 



24 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



fail to leave an impress upon the minds and hearts of young 
people that shall influence them long after school days are over. 
They are our silent teachers, but their works endure. I am try- 
ing to find some capable person who is Willing to explain these 
pictures to the pupils. I would gladly give a period a week for 
this purpose. The trouble is that our artist friends are altogeth- 
er too modest. 

School Exhibit. 

The annual school exhibit was held in the Town Hall the 
latter part of May, and was well attended. To many of the 

parents it furnished the only opportunity to inspect and com- 
pare the work of their own children with that of others, and 
for this reason every child's work should have a place in the 
display. Parents are disappointed, too, if they do not find it 
there and are inclined to belittle the whole exhibit on that ac- 
count. 

On the whole the exhibit was conceded by both parents 
and visitors to rank high. We heard no adverse criticism; sur- 
prise and commendation were exoressed in about equal meas- 
ure. The work of the Domestic Science and Manual Training 
departments required a large amount of space and for this rea- 
son perhaps the other school work was not so favorably dis- 
played. Plans are already in mind to relieve this pressure and 
we hope another year to give each department equal privilege 
and opportunity. 

Promotions, Diplomas and Certiorates of Attendance. 

1 sincerely regret the necessity for further reference to these 
matters; but from an experience gained during the month of 
June, 1 am satisfied that a restatement of the terms upon which 
promotions are based will not come amiss although it may be 
considered by some as a meaningless repetition. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 25 



The standard of seventy per cent as a passing mark, we 
consider reasonable and fair to all concerned. The school has 
a rank and standing to be maintained and the pupil must be 
required to make commendable effort. If a High School diploma 
is worth its face value — means just what it says in full measure 
— it is a very valuable asset to its possessor. It is a guaranty of 
good work, and of the integrity of school officials. It is some- 
thing worth striving for and most pupils are willing to work 
hard to obtain it. This is not, however, the class of pupils that 
claim to have been treated unfairly or that have any grievance. 
It is the pupil who does not apply himself that tries to make 
the trouble. To all such let it be said that a diploma is for de- 
serving pupils only, and that a near-senior is as far from a di- 
ploma as a freshman. 

All promotions and graduating requirements are made 
upon the basis of the passing mark already mentioned, seventy 
per cent. If a pupil is slow in his methods of work, he has the 
privilege of repeating his subject the next year. If after re- 

peated trials and failures a pupil completes the four years' at- 
tendance in the Senior High School, he is awarded a certificate 
of attendance which does not guarantee the character of his work 
nor of his conduct. 

Two Sessions for the Senior High School. 

Acting upon the recommendations of the State Board of 
Education and the express wish of a majority of the parents, 
the School Committee adopted the two-session plan for the 
Senior High School. This plan was put in force at the begin- 
ning of the fall term in September and everything is working 
as smoothly as could be wished. 

Under this plan more of the work is done in the school 
rooms; the home work is somewhat reduced and opportunity 



26 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



is given the pupils to have the noon meal in their own homes. 
It keeps the pupils off the street; the nervous rush and flying 
from one thing to another has been eliminated; there is more 
time for laboratory work and for making up work; less occasion 
for flunking; and the teacher can compel pupils to complete 
each day's work as it becomes due. Best of all the door of op- 
portunity to avoid recitations and makeup work by "squeaking 
by is gradually closing. Better work is demanded and is being 
obtained. When the pupil is fully convinced that escape from 
required work is impossible, he will find a new interest in his 
books and his scholarship will improve. 

This plan, too, permits a closer coordination in the work of 
the two High Schools. Pupils in the Junior High School re- 
cite with the classes of the Senior High if their course calls for 
an extended period of preparation as some of the subjects in 
the college course require or make desirable. The reverse of 
this is also true. A Senior High pupil may recite or make up 

review work with classes in the Junior High. This should have 
a tendency to produce a greater degree of thoroughness in the 
work of the High School classes as few of them have any de- 
sire to make recitations in a lower school. 

All this cannot be accomplished in a single term or a single 
year. But I am convinced that we are on the right road and 
that the results to be secured in the future will fully justify the 
change. 

The transportation problem has been somewhat simplified 
as every school in the system begins at the same hour. This 

does away with waiting about for the afternoon jitney as was 
the practice under the old arrangement. 

Every precaution has been taken to safeguard the welfare 
of those who "stay at noon." The girls of the Senior High are 
obliged to spend the noon hour in the Winthrop Building di- 
rectly under the eye of the teacher in charge. The boys remain 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 27 



in the Manning Building under the charge of Mr. Jackman. 

Salaries. 

Teachers' salaries have been raised during the year to a 
point still far below that received in the industries. A bonus 
has also been granted which will remain in effect only so long 
as the present high cost of living continues. This increase was 
imperative. It should be bourne in mind that the amount paid 
our teachers does not represent the net sum which they may 
call their own. The Teachers' Retirement Fund calls for five 
per cent, of the gross amount received and must in all cases be 
equal to or $35. per annum. To satisfy this requirement the 
salary must be equal to $700., a sum in excess of the salary re- 
ceived by the majority of our teachers before the bonus of $50. 
per year was granted them. 

We made strict inquiries as to the salaries paid in other 
towns of the same population and wealth as our own, and in 
no case was our schedule equal to those of the places invest- 
igated. 

Many of our teachers compare very favorably with those 
in other towns and cities receiving nearly twice what ours re- 
ceive. They are industrious, conscientious, and loyal to the in- 
terests of the school. They have had experience and are fully 
prepared to render the best possible service. Under these cir- 
cumstances, I feel that in those cases where especial fitness and 
evidences of good work are discernible, it would be a matter of 
simple justice to allow the bonus recently awarded to become 
a part of the permanent salary of the most successful teachers. 
These are the teachers we must retain if we wish to maintain 
the present standard of our schools. 

It is by no means certain what the next salary movement 
n to be. Present indications seem to point to a higher level. 
Many who left teaching to go into the service or to accept 



28 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



government positions will not return to school work. The sum 
total or these cases will constitute a tremendous aggregate, and 
reduce our available teaching force to a very small contingent. 

Again, many of those who had prepared for Normal school 
training did not attend Normal schools at all, but accepted 
clerical or other positions where the salary was much higher 
than that paid by the schools, Industrial conditions may force 
some of these back to the Normal school. But even then the 
depletion of the upper classes in our High School is bound to 
be reflected in our Normal school enrollment for one or two 
years. This will cause a scarcity of trained teachers, for whom 
school official will pay an advance before accepting the ser- 
vices of an untrained and inexperienced teacher. If we wish 
to retain our best teachers, wa must meet this competition. 

Candle wood School. 

The school in the Candlewood district has been re-opened. 
Nineteen pupils are in attendance. This change is the result of 
threatened suspension of car service, lack of other transporta- 
tion facilities, and the express wish of parents in that section. 
It furnishes the best illustration for the satisfactory settlement of 
the transportation problem that is to be found anywhere. It re- 
lieves the parents of a burden of anxiety as the children are 
more directly under the influence of the homes, and should pro- 
mote the moral, physical, and intellectual welfare of the chil- 
dren. Best of all it will develop a love of home and teach our 
boys that farming or working upon the land, though hard work, 
is both healthful and honorable, and even needful if the present 
tendency to rush to the cities is to be checked. It may also 

offer a partial solution for the farmers' help-problem, and sup- 
ply us with a stock of good, sturdy boys and girls, who shall 
know their rights and dare maintain them. 1 see no reason 

why the rural school should not measure up to the standard of 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 29 



town or city schools provided other things are equal. The teach- 
er, not the locality, makes the school. 

Branch Libraries. 

Branch Libraries have been established at the Linebrook 
and Candlewood schools. A selected list of books is sent to 
the teachers of these respective schools, who act as librarians. 
The books are distributed and exchanged among parents and 
pupils alike according to the requirements and tastes of each. 
How such an arrangement is helpful and beneficial is too ob- 
vious to all. Further comment is unnecessary. 

Courses for Evening School Teachers. 

Teachers in the evening school have taken the full courses 
offered by the Massachusetts Board of Education, "How to 
Teach the Immigrant." Better results are already apparent. 

Teachers' Meetings. 

Teachers' meetings are held once a fortnight, in room 3 of 
the Manning School on alternate Wednesday afternoons at 
3.45 o'clock. Owing to pressure of other work this schedule 
has not been held to so strictly as it should have been, but as 
things work back to normal conditions improvement is to be ex- 
pected. 

It is hoped that all who are interested in educational prob- 
lems or methods will avail themselves of the opportunity to at- 
tend these meetings and to take part in the discussions. We 
also strongly urge all those who have a place on our substitute 
teachers' list to attend these meetings as a part of the teaching 
force. 

No School Signals. 

The old system gave rise to so much confusion and 



30 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



uncertainty that the following change was made necessary: 

4 blasts at 7.30: 

No morning session in any school. 

4 blasts at 8.00: 

No morning session in the first six grades. 

4 blasts at 1 1 .00: 

No afternoon session in any school. 

4 blasts at 1 1.30: 

No afternoon session in the first six grades. 

In the absence of any signal at I 1 .00 the afternoon session 
for the Junior and Senior High Schools will be held as usual. 
1 eachers and pupils must be present at such sessions as on 
other days. Excuses and make-up work must be required from 
all pupils who absent themselves at such times. No signal at 
I 1 .30 indicates that the regular afternoon sessions for the first 
six grades are to be held as on other days. All should bear in 
mind that the 7.30 or the 8.00 o'clock signal does not excuse 
teachers or pupils for the entire day. In case of clearing weath- 
er during the forenoon, afternoon sessions will be held as 
usual. 

Penny Savings. 

In one particular our schools were prepared for war. The 
penny savings which started from such feeble beginnings, had 
laid the foundation upon which the war movement has built a 
most pretentious structure. 

Under present conditions it is impossible to itemize the re- 
ceipts and disbursements under appropriate heads; as, on 
some days all the receipts were expended for thrift stamps, or 
war saving stamps; on other days pupils withdrew from their 
deposits for the same purpose. The money is collected from 
each school, except the Senior High School, every week and 
will average about $45. per week. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 3 1 



The table below will show ths amount of money which the 
children in the various schools have saved during the year, and 
the manner in which they have invested the same: 

Amount on hand Feb. 1, 1918 $373 5S 

Withdrawn for new Savings Bank Book $158 00 

Withdrawn for Thrift Stamps 25 58 



78 58 



Balance on hand Feb. 1,1919 $195 00 

Liberty War Sav. Thrift Total 

Bonds Stamps Stamps 



Wainwright School 


500 


.165 


17.00 


682.00 


Cogswell School 


600 


80 


23.25 


703.25 


Payne School 


200 


240 


46:50 


486.50 


Dennison School 


400 


340 


29.50 


769.50 


Burley School 


650 


565 


105.25 


1 320.25 


Winthrop School 


3750 


1790 


102.00 


5642.00 


High School 


5150 


1395 


46.75 


6591.75 



Candlewood School 50 30 6.00 86.00 

Grape Island School 50 50.00 

11350 4605 376.25 16331.25 

It should be said that these results are in a large measure 
due to the enthusiasm and hard work of the teachers who have 
tried to teach a very practical type of patriotism. In some 
cases individual rooms have gone "over the top." Other rooms 
lacked but a few purchasers of doing the same. 



32 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



This showing is extremely gratifying from many points of 
view. It shows that a large portion of our pupils are acquiring 
the thrift habit, which, if persisted in until the habit becomes 
firmly established, will be of inestimable advantage to them all 
through life. We understand that these stamps are to be on 
sale for another year at least and we hope that parents will 
urge their children to continue to purchase them even though 
the enthusiasm of the movement does subside a little. A small 
bank account or a few war saving stamps may prove a deter- 
mining factor in the career of many a boy or girl. The advan- 
tages of systematic savings are very many and cannot be too 
strongly emphasized. 

Repairs and Improvements. 

Repairs have been kept at the lowest possible point con- 
sistent with real economy. The cost of material has been be- 
yond our reach and labor was- not to be had. The one prin- 
cipal item of work undertaken was the attempt to improve the 
heating and ventilating in the Manning School Building. This 
was done during the summer vacation and if continuous use is 
to be considered a test we are justified in saying that the work 
was successful. At present we can direct the heat where it is 
needed as we can control its distribution, something we have 
been unable to do heretofore. In addition to this we are 
making a considerable saving in fuel. 

The central plot in the school yard has not heen neglected. 
We have transplanted fifty Mountain Laurels, twelve Canadian 
Yews, and twelve Dogwoods or Flowering Cornels. If these 
survive the winter they should make one mass of bloom by an- 
other season. 

We are in hopes to complete the work on this plot in the 
spring, and to give our attention to the grounds in the rear of 
the buildings. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 33 



Teachers' Classes. 

A class in educational psychology, with a particular empha- 
sis on the teaching of history, has just been started. The class 
is composed of the teachers of the first eight grades, and is un- 
der the instruction of the agent of the University Extension De- 
partment of the State Board of Education. 

A few of our teaehers have cempleted one or more 
courses under this Department, and our plan is to have all en- 
gage in this work as a sort of post-graduate study. This will 
help us to keep in touch with the latest and best methods of in- 
struction, as well as to enable us to pursue some branch of 
study as our work or taste may dictate. 

Dental Clinic. 

Through the efforts of the School Physician a dental clinic 
has been established at the Cable Memorial Hospital with Dr. 
Kyes and Dr. Smith in charge. For further information as to 
the work of this department you are referred to the special re- 
ports of the School Physician and the School Nurse to be found 
in another place. 

Lectures — Excur sions. 

Illustrated lectures and school talks have been confined to 
very narrow limits on account of the large amount of time lost 
by the epidemic and from other causes, chief among which has 
been the uncertain car service. 

Our community welfare work has suffered from the same 
cause as also have our contemplated excursions to local historic 
places under the guidance of Rev. T. Frank Waters who has 
generously consented to accompany such classes. We are in 

hopes to have all these activities in full swing acoording to a well 
selected program by the beginning of the spring term. 



34 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



School Orchestra — Glee Club. 

It is with feelings of the greatest satisfaction that I make an- 
nouncement of these two school activities. The glee club was 
started a few years ago and had made a steady progress and 
growth up to last September, when its influence began to ex- 
tend and resulted in a phenominal growth in membership and 
musical ability. In fact the whole school is showing an in- 

creasing interest in things musical. 

The school orchestra after many attempts and failures has 
at last established itself as a major school activity and has en- 
titled itself to consideration as an important factor in the up- 
building of a desirable school influence. Under the direction 
of Miss Lewis, the science teacher, an organization was effected 
and practice work and rehearsals have continued weekly up to 
the present time. With a fair rate of growth and constant prac- 
tice, this orchestra should soon be able to furnish the music for 
all our school functions. Further comment here is unnecessary 
as these topics will be discussed in the report of the Super- 
visor. 

War Activities. 

The pupils of all our schools have had a part in those ac- 
tivities growing out of the undertakings necessitated by the war. 
In every way an effort has been made to avoid duplication. The 
Junior Red Cross, instead of forming another individual unit, 
worked under the direction of the Senior organization and was 
responsible to it alone. The same is true in reference to the 

Pig and Poultry Clubs. This simplified operations and resulted 
in a larger amount of work being done with little or no over- 
sight except b> the regular teacher. 

With the Victory Boys and Girls the case was a little dif- 
ferent. This was a national organization and our own unit was 
directly responsible to an authority outside the local official' 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 35 



leaders. 

In all of these our pupils have shown an admirable spirit 
and have striven to deserve first place in our efforts to win the 
war. 

Community Chorus. 

A Community Chorus was started last fall and under the 
direction of Prof. Eben H. Bailey has proved to be a very help- 
ful and inspiring influence in this community. These gatherings 
are held in the Manning Hall every Sunday afternoon at 3 
o'clock and everyone is most cordially invited to attend and to 
take part in the singing. These occasions have been attended 
by people of all ages, creeds, and nationalities within our town 
limits— a heterogenous assembly to be sure— but unified and 
made homogenous by their innate love of music and the power 
of song. 

Great variety and range both in the character of the music 
attempted and the manner of rendering the same have been 
offered at each meeting. A large portion of the time is devoted 
to chorus work, and this is interspersed with instrumental num- 
bers and selections by soloists or quartettes. The Greek Or- 
chestra has favored us on several occasions as have also Miss 
Bailey, Mr. Albert Dodge and Master Louis Bean, The best 

singers in the community are enrolled in our membership and 
to them we are greatly indebted for many excellent programs. 

On the whole I feel that this line of community work has 
given us splendid results, and furnished to our townspeople a 
source of good, wholesome enjoyment. 

Child Welfare Work. 

We have made arrangements with the State Department of 
Health to hold a Child Welfare exhibit sometime in April or 
May of this year and the Town Hall has been secured for that 



36 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



purpose. 

From the same department we have secured the services of 
special lecturers who will give illustrated talks on the various 
subjects connected with this important work. These will be 

given under the auspices of several of our local organizations in 
the hopes of reaching a larger number of people and of giving 
the information thus obtained the widest possible circulation. 
Moving picture films are also to be pressed into the service. 
Through the courtesy of Mr. Bragdon these will be shown at 
the Opera House. In each case previous announcement will be 
made through the public press. 

Night School. 

Owing to the epidemic of influenza we were obliged to 
postpone the opening of the night school to the last of Octo- 
ber. 

In addition to the method of advertising usually employed, 
arrangements were made with the proprietor of the Opera 
House to throw upon the screen two or three times each week 
the special slides furnished for this purpose by the State Board 
of Immigration. T^ese slides are in three different languages, 
English, Greek and Polish, and should reach the majority of our 
non-Enjjlish speaking population. 

Still the enrollment is not up to the measure of other years. 
This is due to several reasons that may be readily understood 
by a slight survey of the situation. Many of the former pupils 
have passed beyond the legal limits of school attendance, viz: 
twenty-one years of age. The younger portion of these people 
receive their instruction in English through attendance in the 
day school and so do not fill the places made vacant by those 
who pass the age limits. This should be a source of gratifica- 
tion as it furnishes indisputable evidence that our schools are 
accomplishing something in the work of Americanization; and 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 37 



this is about as far as the schools can be expected to go in the 
work under our present age limitations. 

Another view of our night school work is not so assuring. 
Every inducement has been held out to the young people of 
our town to take advantage of the opportunities offered through 
work in the night school. The response has been far from en- 
couraging or satisfactory. Only when it is too late will the real 
significance of these wasted opportunities be realized. But we 
are living under the reign of law whether we are conscious of 
the fact or not, and the day of reckoning will surely come. The 
longer it is postponed, the sadder the awakening. 

Many successful men — men prominent in the large affairs 
of the world - received their start in life at the night school. 
There are thousands who will gladly testify to this fact, and it 
is our hope that more of our young people will resolve to avail 
themselves of these privileges. 

As usual the foreign element formed the larger part of the 
enrollment and made the best attendance records. The Eng- 
lish departments were so thinly attended that it became neces- 
sary to close them before the end of the term. 

Total enrollment 65 

Average attendance 56 

The High School. 

In spite of many changes and interruptions the Senior High 
School has completed anotier successful year. iVlany of our 
pupils withdrew from school to take advantage of the high 
wages paid for unskilled labor, and have not thus far returned. 
This reduced the membership very materially, and at the begin- 
ning of the fall term our enrollment was slightly below that of 
last year, There were fewer pupils entering from Rowley than 
for several years, but during the fall and winter terms additions 
have been received from not a few other cities and towns, until 



38 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



now our membership is quite or fully up to the average for this 
season of the year. 

The school spirit is excellent. There is a cheerfulness and 
an atmosphere of serious application to the work in hand that 
is delightful to witness. An unusually large class (twenty- 

seven) has started for college. These pupils realize that a spec- 
ified amount of work must be done and well done in order to 
reach the desired goal. This creates a very healthful influence 
throughout the school and there are but few who are not 
reached by it. The excellent work of the last graduating class 
also contributed to this end as it gave an impulse to all the 
lower classes. 

And right here let a word be said in reference to the grad- 
uating exercises of the Class of '18. By common consent it was 
regarded as one of the best graduations that the school has 
ever held. The members of the Junior class worked to the 
point of exhaustion in order to make the occasion a pleasing 
and fitting one for the leave-taking ceremonies of their school- 
mates. Outside aids and helps of every kind were conspicuous 
by their absence. The glee club and the school chorus fur- 
nished the musical numbers. Every detail of the work of prep- 
aration was taken up by the undergraduates in the spirit of 
helpfulness and most hearty good will. This evidence of school 
loyalty was a characteristic feature of the occasion and prom- 
ises much for the welfjare of the school. 

The numbers of the class program showed the care and 
preparation which the pupils had given to their part, and the 
whole program was completed without hesitation or delay. 
Doctor Murlin, the President of Boston University, made the 
address which was most enthusiastically received. From be- 
ginning to end the exercises were marked by a simplicity, a 
sanity and a soberness of thought which are always prima facie 
evidence of a well conducted school. In place of noise and 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 39 



parade, there was an air of refinement, of dignity and repose. 
The school is to be congratulated upon its ability to construct 
first-class graduation programs. 

But this graduation is a thing of the past. We must not 

rest, upon our laurels here. There are heights beyond. The 
organization of the school is not at present as perfect as it 
should be. Let it be remembered that Mr. Marston is the only 
male teacher in the school. Male teachers could not be ob- 
tained last year. The amount of responsibility placed upon his 
shoulders has been more than doubled. This he has borne 

without complaint. Still the standard of the work has not suf- 
fered. But relief should be given by another year at least. 

There is another thing that brings an additional burden to 
him as well as to the whole corps of teachers. We have too 
many small classes. To be sure we are, under the present ar- 
rangement, doing the best we can for the individual pupil, but 
at altogether too large a cost of time and effort. This is due 

chiefly to the late shifting of courses at the express wish of the 
pupil. This should not be permitted after the second year. By 
that time the pupil should have discovered his aptitude for cer- 
tain lines of work and should be compelled to hold to the 
course selected. Otherwise he works injury both to himself and 
to the school. For when he attempts to do the work required 
by the college and for which he did not make suitable prepara- 
tion, in a majority of instances he fails. He becomes discour- 
aged and the school receives a bad name. We will admit that 
college requirements are still rather arbitrary, but yet no pupil 
should be given any encouragement to enter the higher school 
without devoting two years of the four at least to a thorough 
preparation. 

The trouble is truthfully speaking that the school is not to 
blame. Neither is the boy. College men cannot always tell 

what they wish to become or do in after life. Why should the 



40 iPSWfCH SCHOOL REPORT. 



high school boy be expected to do so? Too many of us are 
still in the shifting, drifting class, and we do not count ourselves 
as very blameworthy. Happy is he who finds his work and 

knows it when he has found it. 

Under ordinary conditions a boy selects his high school 
course — and the college boy as well — because his "chum" has 
chosen it. "If it is good enough for John, it is good enough for 
me," he argues. This method of selection is by no means con- 
fined to his first year. The danger lies in his having too many 
chums," of many minds. 

Now this method is perfectly natural but is not scientific. 
And so we are going to try to assist the pupil to make a choice 
— wisely if possible. To this end a Teacher-Counsellor Asso- 
ciation has been formed, by which the pupils are to choose 
from the list of teachers some particular one of them who shall 
act as his special guide and counsellor. The teacher so chosen 
is to act in full sympathy and co-cperation with the parents and 
the pupil's former teachers in an effort to become acquainted 
with any marked trend or tendency or aptitude the boy may 
possess. In this way, with the help of carefully kept records, 
we are in hopes to be able to assist the boy so that his choice 
may be something more than the result of whim or caprice. 

Boys who make no choice of a Counsellor have one as- 
signed them by the Principal. The Counsellor is expected to 
hold frequent conferences with the parents, and to keep fully 
posted as to the pupil's work and conduct. This will bring pupil„ 
parent and teacher into a close and sympathetic touch, 
and if all are sincere and work harmoniously, great good must 
result. In this way we are in hopes to reduce the number of 
disappointed misfits, reduce the number of classes, and to give 
the boy a right start at the earliest possible moment. 

The small class nuisance has been attacked from another 
angle. The School Committee has. made a rule that all new 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 41 



classes must have a membership of at least ten pupils. The 
rule is not ironclad, and this year conditions were such that not 
a few of the pupils would have suffered loss had not the rule 
been suspended for the time being. 

The school work has not been given a fair trial under the 
two-session plan, inasmuch as the electric car lines failed to 
maintain the old schedule. Pupils were from fifteen to twenty 
minutes late in the morning and they were obliged to be dis- 
missed thirty minutes before closing time in the afternoon. 
This robbed the pupil of his study period in school and com- 
pelled more home work. 

But conditions are fast returning to normal and, as was said 
at the outset, the school is doing good, honest work. 

Recommendations. 

(1.) Wiring the Manning Building for Electric Lighting. 

The present system of lighting by gas is inconvenient, inad- 
equate and expensive. On dark days and during the sessions 
of the evening school the light is wholly insufficient and very 
trying to the eyesight. Pupils should not be allowed to work 

under such conditions as the continual eye-strain is bound to 
result in very serious consequences. 

Again, we need the electrical connection for the use of the 
lantern. We have a good machine and a fine series of slides. 
At present we can use these only in the hall on account of the 
lack of proper connection in the various class rooms where the 
great value of such a help can be most clearly demonstrated. 

These connections are also needed in the laboratories for 
the performance of the various experiments required by the 
work in physics and chemistry. 

The present cost of the change of systems may be a little 
in excess of what it would have been before the war. But 1 feel 



42 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



that the increase in the quantity and quality of the work that 
can be accomplished by the change will more than offset any 
problematical difference in price. 

(2.) Relaying Two Floors in the Manning Building. 

These floors are the same ones that were put in place when 
the building was constructed. After the wear and tear of forty- 
five years it is not strange that they should show signs of hard 
usage. To clean them thoroughly or to keep them clean is an 
impossibility. Neither can the desks be securely fastened to 
such a foundation. 

Relaying two floors this year would do much towards im- 
proving the appearance and the sanitary conditions of the 
rooms. 

(3.) More Rational Method of Instruction for 
Defective Children. 

Some provision should be made for a more rational method 
of instruction for the defective children in our schools and a 
more rigid system of grading. More account must be made of 
their individual differences and better conditions provided tor 
their mental and moral advancement. This is a large problem 
and should receive the most careful consideration. The con- 
tributing causes must be first studied and then removed if pos- 
ble. We feel that much can be accomplished on this side of 
the question by securing the co-operation of the parents in pro- 
viding a reasonable amount of sleep and proper food. A well 
enforced curfew law would be helpful. 

Tentative plans for the employment of a special teacher are 
under consideration. 

(4.) A New Fence On the Eastern Boundary. 

Building a line fence on the eastern boundary of the school 



1 PS WICH SCHOOL REPORT. 43 



grounds running parallel to Manning Street. This old fence is 
both a nuisance and a scandal and would have been rebuilt 
last year had men and material been obtainable. 

(5.) Straightening the Rear Line Fence. 

Straightening the line in the rear of the Manning and Win- 
throp schools is recommended. The additional space is need- 
ed for a suitable playground for the pupils of these two schools. 
At present the children are crowded into narrow spaces and 
sharp angles which furnish no room for organized play. The 

improved appearance of the school grounds would more than 
compensate for the slight cost of this change. 

(6.) Sanitary Conditions at the Payne and 
Cogswell Schools. 

For several years past the school authorities have called at- 
tention to the sanitary conditions at the Payne and Cogswell 
schools and have asked for an appropriation sufficient to cover 
the expense of the proposed change. Recently the matter has 
again been called to our attention, and steps have been taken 
to ascertain the probable cost. But we find that the biate im- 

poses so many restrictions on work of this kind that it will be 
impossible to undertake any remodeling or improvement along 
this line. When you know that improvements are to cost more 
than the buildings themselves are worth, it becomes neeessary 
to abandon the project. That is precisely the case here, and 
we feel obliged to dismiss it. 

It is possible that some good may come out of this an- 
nouncement, for it will relieve the school authorities of inten- 
tional neglect and place the blame where it belongs. 

(7.) Change of Text Book. 

A change of text book will be desirable as soon as the map 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



of Europe assumes permanent shape. Other changes are under 
consideration and will be made as soon as the same can be 
done most economically. 

(8.) Change Recommended in Age Limit for School 

Attandance. 

• A change in the age limit for school attendance to 1 6 years 
instead of 1 4 as at present has been recommended, and our 
Representative has been notified of the fact. As there is an 

omnibus Bill on educational matters covering this item in a 
modified form, there is a possibility that this most desirable 
change may become a law. 

Having gone over the ground very carefully the Committee 
has agreed to ask for an appropriation covered by the follow- 
ing budget. It should be remembered in considering these es- 
timates that more than $2000. will be refunded to the town in 
the shape of tuition from the town of Rowley. 

Budget. 

General Expenses $ 4,000. 

Teachers' Salaries 29,000. 

Text Books and Supplies 3,400. 

Transportation 2,700. 

Janitors* Services 2,500. 

Fuel and Lights 4,000. 

Buildings and Grounds 2,500. 

Furniture and Fixtures 400. 

Diplomas 1 00. 

Insurance 300. 

Other Expenses 100. 

Total 49,000. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 45 



Acknowledgments. 

In closing, I wish to acknowledge with a deep sense of grat- 
itude my feelings of obligation to all those who by their loyalty 
and fidelity have assisted me in carrying on the work of a most 
strenuous and trying year. To the School Committee and teach- 
ers for their rare good judgment and conscientious devotion to 
the interests and upbuilding of our schools; to Mrs. Mary B. 
Maine for her co-operation and assistance in providing special 
books and periodicals for the use of both teachers and pupils, 
and especially in extending the benefits of the library to our 
rural schools; to the Police Department for their assistance in 
returning boys to school and in rendering aid of various sorts to 
the Attendance Omcer; to Mr. J. A. Huckins and his employees 
for their continued interest in and care for the school grounds; 
to these and to all the good people of the town who have so 
generously supported me, I ender my heartfelt thanks. 
Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH I. HORTON. 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL. 



To the Superintendent of Schools, 

Ipswich, Mass. 

Dear Sir: — 

In compliance with your request I herewith sub- 
mit a brief report of the work we are trying to accomplish in the 
Junior High School. 

The school year has been very much interrupted owing to 
illness of pupils and teachers. Besides the loss of actual time, 
we are called upon to meet the many demands necessitated by 
war time conditions, such as work in connection with the va- 
rious war drives, and the formation of various clubs regarding 
the food supply, etc. We are very willing and glad to do our 

bit, but nevertheless it is bound to detract somewhat from the 
attention given strictly to school work. 

The courses in the Junior High School have remained the 
same as outlined in last year's report, — the academic, commer- 
cial, household arts, and industrial arts. 

As we have received no help this year from the Senior 
High teachers, the commercial work has been done by the reg- 
ular teachers in connection with arithmetic, language and spel- 
ling. The Superintendent has willingly helped us by giving his 
time three periods a weak to the teaching of elementary science. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 47 



Our Latin class is very small, only two pupils taking Latin 
in the Senior High School. 

We had no Manual Training teacher during the first quar- 
ter of the present school year. The boys have not had quite 
the chance to specialize in this line of work as the girls have 
had in domestic science. At present, however, the boys are 

gladly and happily working with their new teacher. 

Early in the Spring our pupils gave a patriotic concert and 
prize speaking contest from which a sum of money was realized 
for purchasing a screen, rattan couch, and table for the upper 
hall of the building. These articles, with furniture previously 
bought, will provide a place where a child who is ill may re- 
tire from the class for rest and first aid treatment. 

One new feature has been introduced into the educational 
scheme, — physical training, including gymnastics, setting-up ex- 
ercises, organized play, and folk dancing. Obviously, the chief 
aim of this phase of our work is to improve the mental and 
physical health of the child. Ten to fifteen minutes daily are 
devoted to this work. The teachers act as supervisors, while 
the pupils elect captains or leaders who teach and develop the 
exercises. In this way we expect to develop self management 
and co-operation on the part of the students. 

For several weeks the Junior High School has maintained 
a column in one of our local papers. The short parapraphs 

and news items are crude and of necessity simple and child- 
like. But with earnest endeavor and practice we hope this 
column will show signs of improvement in the construction of 
English as well as in content The seeing of these compositions 
in print will serve as an encouragement to the writers and act 
as an incentive to others to put forth some effort along this 
most important line of school work. 

Daring the Red Cross drive in December the Junior High 
School was orncicially organized for Junior Red Cross work 



48 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT 



under the leadership of Miss Alice Lockwood. 

The school has made a very good record this past year in 
government savings. The pupils have shown great enthusiasm. 
The seventh and eighth grades combined own $1900. in liberty 
bonds, $785. in war savings stamps and $36.25 in thrift 
stamps. 

In the United War Work Campaign fifty-seven boys and 
girls pledged themselves to earn and give $144.50 to the "Vic- 
tory" boys and girls fund. Already $69.72 has been paid. 

Both teachers and pupils have lived in a happy and con- 
genial atmosphere during the year. Our teachers have worked 
hard and worked together for the welfare of each and every pu- 
pil. The children, with very few exceptions, have responded 
nobly. 

In closing I would like to say that the teachers would glad- 
ly welcome the parents and friends to the school at any and all 
times. 

KATHARINE F. SULLIVAN, 

Principal. 



HOME GARDENS. 



The home garden proposition was worked out on a little 
different plan this past season. During the early Spring the pu- 
pils in the schools were strongly urged to plant a garden. 
When it came to planting time, cards were distributed to the 
children which were taken home to be signed by both parents 
and children. In this way there were very few homes visited 
where the children who had earlier promised to plant gardens 
had failed to do so. 

During the spring and summer seasons the inspector of 
home gardens attended the bi-weekly meetings of the county 
supervisors held at Hathorne under the direction of the county 
agent, Mr. Ralph Gaskell. These meetings were very helpful 
and kept the supervisors in touch with what was being done 
throughout Essex County. 

These home gardens were much more successful this year. 
They were better cared for and were planted more extensively. 
One boy gave the following report of his garden: 

Soid- 

8 bus. Potatoes at $1 .60 $1 7.80 

Corn 4.00 

Beans 2.00 



50 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



2 bus. Carrots 2.00 

1 1 bus. Onions 1 1 .00 



Total $31.80 

In addition this boy had seven quarts of beans and six 
bushels of carrots which he did not sell. 
A second boy reports as follows: 

Raised — 

5 bus. of Potatoes. 
350 lbs. Squash. 
250 lbs. Pumpkins. 
35 qts. Beans. 
250 ears of Corn. 

This child sold products to the amount of $18.50. 

A great many boys and girls who did not sign the cards 
gave as their excuse that they intended to work with their fath- 
ers in the larger family garden. Many of them did work and 
worked hard. 

One hundred and thirty-two gardens were visited. 

Of these— 

41 were excellent. 
43 " good. 

31 " fair. 

5<< 
poor. 

4 children had moved and were obliged to give up their 
garden. 

2 children planted gardens twice, only to have the wood- 
chuck eat them each time. 

6 children had no gardens. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 5 1 



Club Work. 

The direction of the local poultry and pig clubs also fell to 
the lot of the garden supervisor. In May Mr. Rice, the state 
pig club leader, and Mr. Gaskill gave short talks to the pupils 
of the upper grades on raising pigs to help win the war by pro- 
viding some of the much needed fats. As a result, over fifty 
boys and girls raised pigs the past year. Many of these chil- 
dren raised two and three pigs. Those who were unable to 
procure a pig from the local farmers were supplied by the Es- 
sex County Farming Association. 

During the summer two Field Days were held for pig club 
members. The first of these was at Upland Farms in July, Mr. 
Kennedy and Mr. Howard of the Agricultural School faculty 
taking charge. Mr. Kennedy gave a talk on judging a good 
pig; A judging team for the County Field Day was also 
formed. 

In August the Essex County boys and girls Field Day was 
held at Hathorne. Three of our boys were on the pig judging 
team, two of them taking first and third prizes. 

The first of December when the state contest closed thirty- 
two boys and girls out of forty who joined completed their rec- 
ords which were sent to the state pig club leaders. We are 
hoping that Ipswich will again win one or more of the prizes 
offered by the state and county. 

In November Mr. Dean, the state poultry leader, and Mr- 
Howard addressed the upper grades on poultry raising. At 
present twelve children belong to the state poultry club, though 
many more are raising poultry. 

We are hoping that when the spring of 1919 opens both 
children and parents will renew their efforts along the lines just 
mentioned, not only for the production of food but for their 
own health, strength and knowledge through intelligent labor 
in the sunshine and the open air. As Commissioner Claxton 



52 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



says, it is good for children to work joyously out of doors with 
their feet in the soil, their heads in the sunshine and their lungs 
filled with good fresh air; to work until they are tired and hun- 
gry and they will eat heartily and sleep soundly as a result. 



Respectfully submitted, 

KATHARINE F. SULLIVAN. 



DOMESTIC SCIENCE DEPARTMENT. 



To the Superintendent of Schools, 
Dear Sir: — 

The work done this year in this department has 
been of a very practical nature. In the fall of the year a great 
deal of canning and preserving was done for various townspeo- 
ple. They furnished all the materials and the girls did the 
work. In this way the girls gained a practical as well as theo- 
retical knowledge of canning, preserving and jelly making. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 53 



Corn was the only vegetable that was canned. Among other 
work done were the following things: peaches canned, pears 
canned, apple and quince preserve, apple jelly, apple jam, car- 
rot marmalade, citron melon preserve, apple and raisin marma- 
lade, raisin and cranberry marmalade. More work would have 
been done along this line but for the closing of schools because 
of influenza. 

Since finishing canning and preserving, dishes have been 
prepared that the pupils can make at home. The most econom- 
ical recipes are chosen, economical in that they are cheap in 
price and at the same time furnish a high food value. The 
combining of different dishes is studied so that the pupil may 
make up simple menus. 

The food materials which are used in the class are studied 
with regard to their origin and preparation for market. In this 
way the pupil learns the nature of the material she is using and 
can handle it to a better advantage. 

The actual cooking of certain articles of food that require a 
long time has to be omitted because of the length of the pe- 
riods devoted to cookery. The methods of making are ex- 
plained and the pupils are encouraged to try them out at home. 
The pupils report the results of their work at home and in this 
way the home and the school are brought closer together. 

Instruction in housekeeping is correlated with that of the 
preparation of food. The pupil must acquire habits of neat- 
ness and efficiency while they are practicing cooking and house- 
keeping. Dish-washing, sweeping, cleaning, fire-building, and 
in fact the care of all parts of the Household equipment is taken 
up in the classes. 

The making of a hospital bed with a patient in it is taught 
in all the classes. This teaches the girl to be of great assist- 

ance when there is sickness in the home, 

The work in the High School is along the same lines as 



54 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



that of the grades, but is somewhat more advanced. The girls 
in the High School that are taking the course in cookery this 
year have a good working knowledge of the art of cookery and 
they can be depended upon to do very good work. In addition 
to their regular work the "Victory Girls" had a candy sale and 
in this way earned part of their Victory money which they had 
pledged. 

This course has been planned with the aim to make the 
girls neat and efficient housekeepers. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALICE K. LOCKWOOD. 



SEWING DEPARTMENT. 



The work of the Sewing classes is planned to teach the 
girls to be able to make their own clothes in the most efficient 
way. This requires a study of the following things: choice of 
material best suited for the garment to be made, the use of com- 
mercial patterns, planning and cutting of the material, the 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 55 



fundamental stitches and how to apply them in garment mak- 
ing. 

The first stitches are taught in the 5th grade. The child 

learns the stitches on a practice piece and then applies them 
on the article she is making. The following articles are made 
in the first year of sewing: bean bags, school bags, sewing bags, 
bibs, aprons and petticoats. After making three of the articles 
named the child has learned to make the following stitches in 
the correct way: basting, back-stitching, hemming, over-casting, 
over-handing and the running stitch. 

In the 6th grade the stitches are practiced more to develop 
speed and accuracy in making them. Chemises, nightgowns 

and bloomers are made in this year's work. After one article 
is completed by hand the pupils will learn to stitch on the ma- 
chine and use it in making other garments. 

In the 7th grade the girls get still further practice in the use 
of the machines while making their cooking outfit which con- 
sists of an apron, cap, towel and holder. 

In the 8th grade various articles of clothing are made in- 
cluding underwear, blouses, skirts and dresses. The work this 
year, however, has been confined mostly to Red Cross Sewing, 
an account of wich is given further on in this report. 

The High School has had two classes in sewing. The work 
is of a somewhat broader scope, and quite a variety of gar- 
ments is made from underwear to dresses. 

Repair work and darning are taught in every class, gar- 
ments being brought from home to be repaired. The making 
over of clothes is also taught, as this teaches the girls to be 
thrifty. 

This course is planned not only to teach the girl to be able 
to make her own clothes, but also to do all the sewing that has 
to be done in caring for the home. 

ALICE K. LOCKWOOD. 



REPORT OF THE JUNIOR RED CROSS. 



During the month of December an auxiliary of the Junior 
Red Cross was organized in the Junior High School. The 

memberships were earned partly by 25 cent membership fees, 
partly by work previously done for the Red Cross. In the drive 
for Senior membership, the part of the Janior member was to 
get all the members of his family interested so that they would 
become members of the Senior Red Cross. 

There has been more call for sewing than knitting so far 
this year, so the work done has been along those lines. The 

members have completed ten pairs of bed socks for soldiers, 
and ten chemises for the refugees. The next lot of sewing is to 
be a quota of flannelette petticoats for the refugee children. A 
great deal more work will be completed before the end of the 
year. 

Some knitting is being done this year. Socks, mufflers, 

wash cloths and babies' bonnets have been knit. One Afghan 
has been finished and sent in to the Red Cross headquarters. 
Another one is n:>w in the process of making. 

It is planned to have the members of the Junior Red Cross 
give a few entertainments on Friday afternoons. These will be 
instructive and will keep up the interest of pupils in the work 
for the Red Cross. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. - " 57 



The children enjoy doing this work. It encourages a spirit 
of helpfulness and at the same time they are gaining practical 
experience. 

ALICE K. LOCKWOOD. 



MANUAL TRAINING DEPARTMENT. 



This department was not reopened until December 1, when 
Mr. Arthur W. Gould took charge of the work. 

As he has held this position for only a short time, he has 
asked to be excused from writing a formal report and his re- 
quest has been granted. He much prefers that opinion of the 
quality of his work be based upon the actual inspection of the 
work itself and an opportunity for doing so will be furnished by 
the School Exhibition to be held sometime in the month of May. 

We wish to say however that in our opinion he is doing ex- 
cellent work. He has started at the beginning and is working 
along useful and practical lines. The boys are showing an un- 
usual interest in their work, as the number of applicants for 
this course is constantly increasing, and this, too, in the face of 
very exacting oircumstances. 



58 ' IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



The classes are orderly and and attentive and take a com- 
mendable pride in their work. We feel sure that his pupils are 
receiving a training in accuracy and carefulness that will be re- 
flected in all their school exercises. 

The present number in this department is 155. 

JOSEPH L HORTONL 



DRAWING DEPARTMENT. 



To the Superintendent of Schools, 

Dear Sir: — 

The subject of drawing includes representation, construct- 
ive work, design, decoration, picture study, and picture mak- 
ing. 

Drawing is being taught in all the grades. Children work 
with interest and produce desired results if they see a tangible 
result from their work. For this reason the greater part of the 
work results in a series of projects, ex., the design work appears 
in the decoration of constructed objects, the constructive work 
in a series of objects which bear relation to each other as "A 
Dutch Village" and "A Dining Room," the objects of which 
may be arranged on a sand table. The object drawing appears 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 5-9 



in booklets or in the form of advertisements. Drill work is 

given whenever necessary during the development of the pro- 
jects. In this way, it is hoped not to lessen the amount or min- 
imize the importance of the drill work, but to vitalize it and to 
make its use apparent to the children. The quality of the work 
should show the result of the added earnestness and interest. 

Why teach the drawing? To furnish pupils with a new 
language of expression (pictures) which is understood by all 
people in the world, hence a more universal language than one 
of words. 

Drawing given to the average pupil under average con- 
ditions gives him skill which may be practically applied in 
many fields. We do not teach drawing to make artists or near 
artists of the pupils, although we do discover the exceptionally 
gifted ones and encourage them in that line. We teach draw- 
ing so that teachers, milliners, dress-makers, illustrators, print- 
ers, tailors, silversmiths, embroiderers, builders, plumbers, en- 
gineers, real estate salesmen and contractors may find skill in 
drawing of surpassing value in increasing the success of their 
vocation. 

A person able to sketch with the pencil what is in his mind 
makes him more intelligible, more forceful and more efficient. 

Drawing creates refining influence in the care, beauty and 
orderliness of the home and is reflected in a person's personal 
appearance. 

It teaches discrimination and good taste in the selection of 
colors in draperies, wall papers, rugs, furniture and dress. 

Drawing properly outlined and taught not only aids one's 
practical bread-winning power, but makes life more enjoyable 
because it means so much towards culture and refinement. 

Mechanical Drawing. 

The pupils in the Mechanical class are working with great 



60 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



enthusiasm and interest. The course we wish to cover this year 
includes the drawing of three views of simple objects, objects 
with oblique surfaces, assembly drawings, scale drawings from 
blue prints making drawings larger, scale drawings from ob- 
jects making drawings smaller, cylindrical work and machine 
drawing. The machine drawing work is especially interesting. 
In some lessons one or two views of a machine will be given 
to the pupils and they are to visualize and work out the third 
view. In other lessons pupils will work directly from a piece 
of machinery. The pupils plan the arrangement of their sheets. 
They learn to print properly and carefully. 

Those boys who intend to go to our higher schools of ed- 
ucation such as the Massachusetrs Institute of Technology, the 
Wentworth School and the Worcester Polytechnic need all the 
Mechanical Drawing they can get during the High School 
course. There are those boys who do go to these schools with- 
out the preparation in the High School, and they find it exceed- 
ingly hard to complete the work in the required time, and 
some have to go another year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGIA L. BLAISDELL. 



MUSIC REPORT. 



To the Superintendent of Schools, 

Ipswich, Mass. 
My Dear Sir— 

In reply to your request. I am submitting to you 
my report of the music in the schools of Ipswich for the past 
year. 

No changes have been made in the grades during the year. 
We are using the New Educational Music Course throughout 
the town and the results are most satisfactory. More time is 
being devoted to individual work in the first six grades than 
ever before, as it seems to your supervisor that if the individual 
is thoroughly familiar with the fundamental principles of music, 
good class-singing must necessarily result. To this end, the 

teachers are instructed with each and every pupil, and the child 
is obliged to do the same amount of individual work in music 
as in his other studies. This, of course, does not hinder his 

class singing. Quite the opposite is true. As a whole, the 

grade work seems to be progressing very smoothly. Your su- 
pervisor visits the Linebrook and Candlewood schools once 
each month and expects to obtain good results. 

At the present writing, the Junior High School is preparing 
a concert to be given in connection with the Senior High, under 



62 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



the name of the Junior Liberty Chorus. Community singing 

seems to have come to us in leaps and bounds and it is only 
fitting that our younger people should take an active part in 
this. Consequently, the Junior and Senior High School com- 
bined, with a chorus of approximately four hundred voices, 
have formed themselves into a junior liberty chorus. The suc- 
cess of this chorus may be very readily seen at our concert to be 
given in the Opera House, Ipswich, February 1 4. Again, the 

chorus is available for use at any time the public feels it could 
use them. Liberty Loan drives, Red Cross meetings, a welcome 
to the boys coming home, all of these could be helped by the 
use of the chorus. 

Concerts were given last year by both the Junior and Sen- 
ior High Schools which were surely a great success. The Jun- 
ior High knows that a year must not go by without their annual 
concert and I know that the people look forward to it. As ev- 
idence, the interest taken in that given last year. Too much 
credit cannot be given Miss Sullivan, principal of the school, 
for her untiring efforts to help. 

May I say a few words in regard to the music in the High 
School. At the present time, music is compulsory. I meet the 
chorus once a week and the pupils secure some instruction in 
singing each morning under the very able direction of Miss 
Lewis. It is a pleasure to meet this class each week, and to 

the person who has not heard them during their Thursday 
morning period, I must confess I think it would be a revelation. 
Their interest is keen, and with the assistance of all the teachers 
who meet with them, we cannot help but get fine results. 

The Glee Club this year is larger than ever, with a mem- 
bership of nearly fifty. They meet each week and under the 
direction of the leader, Miss Lillian Brown, are preparing for 
their annual concert. I cannot speak too highly of the co-oper- 
ation of the principal, Mr. Maraton, who has been of such 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 63 



inestimable assistance to me in bringing about these results. 

The High School Orchestra, under the leadership of Miss 
Lewis, is far in advance of anything as yet attempted in this line 
in our High School. They have furnished the music for various 
entertainments in the assembly hall and every encouragement 
should be given them to continue their good work. If the in- 
centive could be given for outside study of some instrument as 
is done in quite a few other cities and towns, even bands could 
be formed as well as orchestras. Perhaps it might be advisa- 

ble to consider this matter. 

In closing, I wish to thank you personally for your assist- 
ance to me in all my work. With such co-operation as I have 
received, we must obtain results. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR H. TOZER, 

Supervisor of Music. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 



Ipswich School Department, 
Joseph I. Horton, 

Superintendent, 
Dear Sir: — 

I beg to submit my first report as director of physical 
education in the Public Schools of Ipswich. In doing this I 

would gratefully acknowledge the hearty reception which this 
new work has received by masters, principals, teachers and pu- 
pils, and express to you my appreciation 6f your effective man- 
agement in making teachers and pupils take hold in a very ef- 
ficient manner. 

The object of our system of physical education is manifold. 
Its first aim must be to promote health. This means that there 
must be sufficient daily physical exercise, if necessary several 
times repeated during the sessions, to insure physiological ef- 
ficiency of the vital machinery of every child. Sedentary occu- 
pations naturally slow down the vital processes in the body and 
this can only be efficiently counteracted by vigorous exercises 
which involve the large muscles of the body, Avhich will stimu- 
late circulation, respiration and ventilation and the elimination 
of waste product of metabolism. If every child can exercise 

sufficiently often during school hours, every day, we insure our 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 65 



pupils effectively against lowering of vitality. This should finally 
result in the development of surplus vitality. This every child 
should possess, if we do not want him to break down under 
prolonged and intense mental training with the accompanying 
nervous drain due to sedentary occupation. 

The second aim is plain physical education. It is mental 

i raining inasmuch as it aims to develop a subconscious unyield- 
ing habit of poise and bearing and economic, graceful and ac- 
c urate use of body movements. This is best accomplished by 
d ill and regimentation, and by frequent repetitions of definite 
exercises in response to exact instructions and by the employ- 
ment of definite commands, demanding precise reactions. There 
are a great many faults in poise and locomotion common to 
many children due to too much sedentary work, to clothing, to 
shces, to lack of home chores, etc., which we meet best by a 
series of well defined exercises. Here we must rely upon our 

teachers and upon our brighter boy and girl leaders to learn 
enough aoout the science of gymnastics to be of help to every 
pupil in learning to do the setting-up and corrective exercises 
correctly. As I have said this means drill and regimentation, 

and to become effective we must work to develop the proper 
understanding of the value of good poise and graceful move- 
ment. We must develop a pride and ambition to be physically 
well-set-up, and help each child to learn the value of self-dis- 
cipline. 

The third aim coincides with that of our general American 
educational aim, inasmuch as it aims at the emancipation from 
external restraint and guidance and making each child a free 
and self-reliant member of society. To do this the child must 
develop good mental and moral habits, and the most important 
mental habit is application and concentration. As a member 

of society each individual must learn the value of co-oeration, 
and of obedience to law, of loyalty to leadership and national 



66 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



ideals, and of patriotism. 

The third aim then must be stimulation of attention and 
volitional neuro-muscular reactions. This we can secure only 

by insisting upon instant and accurate response to all formal 
commands. If this is not secured — if, for instance, a boy res- 
ponds by imitating his neighbor's response instead of thinking 
out his own response for himself — we cultivate habits of mental 
laziness. This may cause weakening of the powers of concen- 
tration and would defeat our purpose of developing concentra- 
tion. 

.»• The great pedagogical value of formal physical exercises 
lies in the fact that we can easily unify all the mental, physical, 
and moral powers of a child by demanding a concentrated ef- 
fort of all these qualities upon motor problems, which through 
the habitual work of generations of ancestors has become a 
fundamental faculty of the human brain in its auto-organization 
of its nerve centers. 

A further value of formal exercises lies in the fact that con- 
certed actions of a number of people responding together ac- 
curately and rhythmically is always stimulating to individual ef- 
forts and thus become a great pedagogical force. In its high- 
est perfection rhythmical co-opeiation causes a great saving of 
kinetic energy of the weaker members of a group. This can 

easily be observed when prolonged efforts are required, such as 
in marching, hiking, and singing by a number of persons. 

For this reason we must try to secure symmetrical response 
from every pupil in a given group. The average ability of a 

class for certain reactions must determine the speed and com- 
plexity of the mass exercises. To go too fast would defeat the 
purpose of mass exercises and may strain individual children. 

There is today hardly need for more arguments in favor of 
more out-door school work, but there is still much need of a 
better understanding by the general public of the high 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT, 67 



educational value of motor activities in the development of an 
efficient central nervous system, and the great influence which 
organized play may exert in the building of character. Organ- 
ized exercises not only insure an equal opportunity for every 
child, be he weak or strong, but it gives the teacher an oppor- 
tun ty to know the real child- the child as he unbends during 
5 pDntaneous action, as he unfolds during intense application 
and when close to nature. The school room child is a prod- 

uct of an artificial environment. The playground child is a 

product of fundamental emotions and hereditary instincts. To 
get hygienic results with normal children no means can possibly 
surpass in value such vigorous outdoor aciivities as running, 
leaping, skipping, bending, twisting, and reaching, especially if 
they are the result of spontaneous interest and unconscious ap- 
plication. We have, therefore, in the plays and games of chil- 
dren and the sports and athletic activities of youth a most ex- 
cellent agent in maintaining physiological efficiency during 
school hours. 

Play, as a method cf recreation and of physical training is 
» unsurpassed, because it uses established co-ordinations and fun- 
damental muscles, especially if a variety of games is practiced. 
It develops vital and functional strength rather than mere mus- 
cular strength, on account of the large extent to which the ma- 
jority of the big groups of mus:Ies are involved. It is at least 
equal to gymnastics so far as these are used as preventive 
measures, because play and gimes are a funiamentel demand 
in the life of young children, and it is only because school inter- 
feres too much with these fundamental elements of child lie 
that later corrective measures become necessary. If our educa- 
tional methods and laboratories and machinery conformed 
more to elementary child life, less corrective measures would 
be needed. 

But we appreciate also, since the advent of experimental 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



psychology and pedagogy, that a rational, wholesome, safe, and 
sane motor life throughout childhood affects beneficially not 
only the child's health, in the commonly accepted sense of this 
term, but that it affects equally as favorably the intellectual and 
moral life. We appreciate more than ever that moral strength 
is dependent upon physical health, that character is in the main 
a "plexis of motor habits," that "man is what he does;" in other 
words, we know that in order to be really efficient men we 
must not only be healthy in body, but must have a healthy and. 
rational mind. Rational, safe, and sane mentality is the out- 
come of a rational motor life, i.e., rational play life. The motor 
experiences of childhood determine to a large extent our habits 
and our character. 

Plato said, ''The play of children has the mightiest influence 
on the maintenance or non-maintenance of laws." It is this 

emphasis on the benefit of play, this great ethical force, which 
the judges of juvenile courts see in the playground activities, 
and it is for this reason that I believe in making play a part of 
our school education. Unlike other cultural agencies for the 

development of the moral side of man, we return to the funda- 
mental activities of the body to get the highest type of charac- 
ter. If we once appreciate that mind, body and soul are inter- 
dependent, we shall see that the soul can best be reached 
through well-directed and organized physical activities in which 
the whole child is interested. Physical education offers more 
opportunities for ethical culture than any other agency because 
it never separates these three parts. 

Our school recesses offer a splendid opportunity for the 
development of good habits of play. To be sure, the large 
number of children which have to be accommodated makes this 
a hard problem during school hours, yet 1 find that organized 
recesses lead up to better free play and to good habits of recre- 
ation. It is the teacher's principal means of reaching the whole 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 69 



child. It helps the child by counteracting the evil effects of se- 
dentary occupations, it fosters character and civic virtue, it de- 
velops the motor brain, makes intellectual training easier and 
the whole school life more attractive, and last but not least, it 
makes the teacher more attractive to the children, becoming as 
much a boon to the one as to the other. 

We are more than ever learning that education for service 
demands on the part of the teacher a knowledge of the whole 
child and not a knowledge of his capacity for academic training 
alone. How are we going to know about the "wrinkles" in a 

child's character and how can we find out the "queer" habits he 
may be developing, unless we give him a chance to expose 
them? It is a teachers business to iron out the wrinkles and to 
train away the queer habits. 

Since it would cost very large sums of money to provide 
gymnasiums and well equipped playgrounds and since these in 
turn would require specially trained instructors, I beg to call 
your attention to the value of'Games and plays for the develop- 
ment of manipulative skill, judgment, and attention for Primary 
and Grammar grades and Junior High schools" which I have 
developed for a number of years and which we employ in the 
schools of Ipswich. 

This form of play may be called our laboratory method -of 
developing accurate and instant response to direction. This 

may be simple or complex and may demand on the part of 
each child more or less complex neuromuscular adjus f ment. t 
gives opportunity to observe and compare individual mental 
powers and physical skill and furnishes innumerable variations 
for training special skill and judgment. The eyes and ears, the 
arms and legs are constantly exercised in diverse relations. But 
with all this there is constant opportunity for developing good 
postures during physical application. The child, by being sud- 
denly called upon to go or to run to a certain place and there 



70 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



to execute a variety of definite evolutions with his hands, invol- 
ving a quick and finely balanced adjustment of trunk and leg 
movements, is not only training mental powers such as atten- 
tion, memory, and judgment, but also acquires good bodily 
poise. This training in a large variety of exercises demanding 
keen senses and fine manipulative skill, together with quick ad- 
justment of postures, not only promotes general mental and phy- 
sical efficiency, but is a greatly needed preparation for a great 
variety of vocations. 

Many modern vocations not only require accurate manip- 
ulative skill, but also speedy repetitions of movements and quick 
co-ordinations. By making many of these plays competitive we. 
prepare directly for modern conditions where innumerable new 
tools and machinery are constantly being introduced and where 
speed as well as accuracy forms an important factor in the 
earning capacity of the worker. We further stimulate by these 
competitive methods individual as well as group efforts. 

Competition unifies the mind of the child by a concentra- 
tion of all his physical, mental, and moral strength upon a given 
problem. Competition is the element in games which makes 

them so pleasurable to the average human being. It has always 
been the great force in human progress. Individual competi- 

tions are especially characteristic of the period of childhood 
from five to thirteen years of age. 

All games promote the social feeling by the promotion of 
friendliness. This develops group consciousness and stimu- 
lates co-operation. 

Here we have, therefore, a powerful agent for developing 
physical, mental, moral, and social virtues. Because we can do 
this work in infinite variations and with very simple and inex- 
pensive tools in our schoolrooms, and because we can use the 
desk arrangement of lines and files so readily for individual 
and team competitions, we have not only a fine laboratory 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 71 



equipment for the development of manipulative skill, but also 
a fundamental means of teaching games and organizations. 

It is possible to judge accurately starts and finishes and fair 
observance of rules and regulations. 

We can observe and stimulate fair play, good leadership, 
and hearty co-operation. We can develop the finest possible 
skill in building up blocks, in setting up candle pins, in tossing 
the bean bag to a target or to a partner. Color, weight, shape, 
and numbers of implements allow an infinite variety of combi- 
nations which can never become monotonous. 

To be sure we cannot develop many of these activities to 
such a degree of vigorous physical exertion as they are possible 
of execution outdoors or in a gymnasium, but they have enough 
physiological value to be called truly recreational. On account 
of their attractiveness for children and their great educational 
value of developing skill and organization they prove to be a 
splendid means for stimulating the play life of our children. 

Many of these exercises can be conducted in the school- 
yards and our playgrounds, but a great many require an abso- 
lutely level surface. If level platforms are available outdoors, 
all these games can be used there. 
Respectfully submitted. 

* ERNST HERMANN, 

Director of Physician Education. 
January. 1919. 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL INSPECTION. 



REPORTS OF THE SCHOOL PHYSICIAN 
AND SCHOOL NURSE. 



To the Superintendent of Schools, 

Ipswich, Mass. 
Dear Sir: — 

The general health of the children as revealed by 
the examinations this year is excellent. Coming as the exam- 

inations did after the pandemic run of Influenza with its com- 
plications, it was rather surprising that the school children as a 
whole, many of whom had the disease in the Fall, showed no 
after effects. Of course, there were a few who did, but the per- 
centage was so small as to be negligible. Right here, I believe, 
is found one of the results of the work which this department 
recommended last year that the schools take up, viz: Physical 
Training. This was adopted in the schools and I have watched 
its development with keen interest. Nothing in my opinion 
that has been added to the work of the schools in recent years 
has been of so great benefit to the children. It is doing much 
to develop strong, healthy bodies. The mental gain that is sure 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 73 



to follow the training will be in evidence later, as the work 
goes on. I would recommend that this work be further devel- 
oped during the coming year. 

One thing revealed by the examinations is that the law re- 
quiring vaccinations against small pox has not been fully com- 
plied with. There are too many unvaccinated children in our 
schools. The duty rests first with the parents, and there it ap- 
pears the laxness begins. It is true that neither the school or 
health authorities have been insistent that the law be rigidly 
enforced, but it is time that existing conditions be remedied. 
While it is true that the school physician is a member of both 
the School and Health Boards it should be borne in mind that 
he is not the Boards. With them rests the authority and power 
to enforce rules and laws governing school attendance. The 

school physician in thus calling the attention of the proper au- 
thorities to the facts is only doing his official duty. He stands 
ready to carry out any instructions of the health or school au- 
thorities. 

The sanitary conditions of the central buildings and the 
Burley are excellent. Conditions at the Cogswell are not only 
bad, they are a menace. Some provision should be made that 
the health of the children may be protected. Not to do it would 
be worse than negligence. Take this as a warning. 

The work of the school nurse has been painstaking and 
thorough. 1 call special attention to two things she has done: 
the talks she has given on personal hygiene in the schools and 
the 1043 visits she has made to the children in their homes. Be- 
low is her report. 

Report of the School Nurse. 

January 1, 19 18, to January 1, 1919. 
Visits to schools 320 

Class inspection and five or -ten minute 



74 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



talks on personal hygiene. 

Visits to children in their homes 1043 

Dental clinics held 3 1 

Visits to dental clinic 160 

Total of 60 children treated. 

Children taken to occulist 4 

Visits to occulist 2 

Children operated 1 7 

Children taken to hospital 1 
Number cases of contagious diseases 95 

German measles 50 

Whooping cough 12 

Chicken pox 1 4 

Pneumonia 1 2 

Scarlet fever 5 

Measles 2 
MARTHA J, STEWART 

Last year I recommended that sanitary squads be formed 
among the children for the practical teaching of certain phases 
of hygiene. I hope the work will be begun this year. I am 
ready to meet the teachers at any time and offer suggestions as 
to how it should be organized. It would supplement to a large 
extent work now being done and would be a benefit and not an 
extra burden for the children. 

In closing I wish to thank you, Mr. Superintendent, the 
teachers and all others who did so much last June to make the 
baby weighing and measuring plan a success. We recorded 709 
children under school age. Records thus obtained should be of 
value, for they give a survey of the material from which our 
school attendance is derived. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. E. Mac ARTHUR, M.D. 

Ipswich, February 1, 1919. School Physician. 



\ 



ATTENDANCE OFFICER'S REPORT. 



To the Superintendent of Schools, 

Ipswich, Mass. 
Dear Sir: — 

In submitting my annual report it is with some de- 
gree of satisfaction that I note that the number of cases of will- 
ful truants have been somewhat less the past year than the years 
previous. The absences, however, have been far in excess of 
those of any recent year. Of course this was due to the epi- 

demic of influenza and other diseases, but nevertheless it was 
necessary to investigate a large number of them as very few 
parents take the trouble to notify the teacher when a child is 
sick. About fifty absences a day was the average for two or 
three weeks in the fall of 191 8. 

There are some cases where a child is found at play on the 
street when the parent thinks he is in school, and when it is 
brought to the attention of the parents, they are very willing to 
co-operate with the attendance officer in getting the child back 
to S2I100I. It often happens that children from entirely differ- 
ent parts of the town are out at the same time, which necessi- 
tates traveling from one end of the town to the other. There 
has been but one occasion for bringing any of the parents or 
children before the court for truancy the past year. The boys 



76 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



are not the only offenders, I regret to say, as some of the girls 
are apt to stay away for very trivial excuses. The attendance 
at the present time is excellent but that is not saying that when 
spring opens it will be the same. 

There is a great tendency for children to leave school as 
soon as they are fourteen years old and get some employment. 
It is to be regretted that such is the case as later on they are 
nearly always sorry for it. I have in mind two cases where 

boys have applied for employment certificates on the day they 
were fourteen years of age, and in both cases they were doing 
good work in school. The parents were at fault in both in- 
stances as they compelled the boys to leave school and go to 
work, and there was no lack of funds which made it necessary 
in either case. 

Occasionally a boy who is found playing truant is taken 
from the public schools and sent to a private school. The total 
number of cases investigated was 379. 

GEORGE W. TOZER, 

Attendance Officer. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



77 



SCHOOL CALENDAR FOR 1919. 



Term 



Begins 



CI 



oses 



Winter 

Spring 

Summer 

Fall 



Dec. 30, 1918 

March 3, 1019 

May 5, 1919 

Sept. 3, 1919 



Feb. 21, 1919 
Apr. 25, 1919 
June 27, 1919 
Dec. 24, 1919 



Holidays. 

Every Saturday; Columbus Day, October 1 2; Wednesday 
Afternoon, Thursday and Friday of Thanksgiving Week; Jan- 
uary 1; February 22; April 19; Memorial Day; June 17; and 
Good Friday. 



HIGH SCHOOL ENROLLMENT, SEPTEMBER, 1918. 



Commercial Course 81 

College Course 29 

Scientific Course 13 

Normal Course 8 

General Course 25 

Post Graduate Course 1 

Special Course 6 



78 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 

Forty-Fourth Annual Commencement 

OF THE 

Jfflamting ^tgf) School Ctos of 1918 

Thursday, June 27th, 1918. 

PROGRAM. 
Star Spangled Banner 
Invocation Rev. Robert B. Parker 

School Chorusr 

(a) Santa Lucia Italian Folk Song 

(b) Out on the Deep Frederick N. Lohr 

(c) All Through the Night Welsh Folk Song 

Salutatory Lillian H. Richardson 

The Real Purpose of Education 

Essay Ivan Elliott Kent 

Bonfires of Old Empires 

School Chorus Song of Deliverance 

Class Prophecy .' Pauline R. Prime 

Valedictory Vivian Russell 

Stars that Never Set 

Address Dr. Lemuel H. Murlin 

President Boston University 

Presentation of Diplomas Herbert W. Mason 

Chairman School Committee 

American Army Hymn By School Chorus 

Benediction 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 79 



CLASS OF 1918. 



Class Officers. 

Ivan E. Kent President 

Mabel Vivian Russell Vice President 

Hester M. Lord Secretary 

Lillian H. Richardson Treasurer 



Class Members. 

COLLEGE COURSE 
Pauline Riley Prime Mabel Vivian Russell 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE 
Ivan Elliott Kent 

COMMERCIAL COURSE 

Marjorie Janvrin Bailey Ethel Eunice Brown 

Lillian Theresa Chisholm George Frederick Gordon 

Esther Velzorah Hirtle Alva Louise Richards 

Lillian Henderson Richardson Margaret Mary Ryan 
Dorothy Gage Titcomb 

NORMAL COURSE 
Hester Merrill Lord Helen Beatrice Mansfield 

CERTIFICATE OF ATTENDANCE 

Gladys Douglas Jewett 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



We have taken these tables of vital statistics from copies 
furnished us by our Town Clerk, Mr. Charles W. Bamford. In 
every case persons born in any of the British Provinces, Ire- 
land, Scotland or Wales have been excluded. As an indica- 
tion of the drift of our school population these figures may pos- 
sess some interest. 



Births. 



Foreign Foreign 

Year Number Fathers Mothers 

1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 



159 


57 


59 


146 


62 


62 


144 


75 


75 


118 


55 


57 


168 


99 


100 


149 


82 


78 


182 


109 


107 







X 




>< 


< 


!< 


N 


< 


< 


s- 


K 


l-H 


Grade 
















1 








Oo 


^J 


[ 


to 




















^1 


to 


O^ 

O0 


o^ 

1 


100 
















__ 


oo 


oo 
|on 


4^ 

oo 


00 




101 
















00 


N 


OO 


to 


0^ 00 


— 














O 


|to 

oo 

O0 


oo 

OO 


to 

4^ 


4> 


to 


vO 


901 


1 








~— 


o> 


to 

on 


tO 


■^J 


O^ 


_ 


O 


91 1 53 


1 




i 




0> 


| 

TO 


I 
to 

o 


^vl 


4^ 


4s- 


' 




— 






to 


oo 


kp 


'" U 


o 


vO 


Oi 


__ 






IO 


00 




4^ 


o 


to 
4^ 


00 


sO 


0^ 


O^ 


Oo 


— 


r 




Oo 


4^ 




m 


to j 


to 

oo 


^ 


4*. 


4*> 


to 


OO 


to 






1 


i 
oo 

vo po 


o 


1 


-U 




. 














Oi 


I 

to 


I 


4^ 


4^ 


i 
o~i 


_ 






I 








o^ 


^ | 


1 

Go 


OO 


— 


— . 


I 




! 












•^1 


j 

I 


i 


1 
j 




i 
1 














1 
i 


00 


! 1 
1 1 


j 














1 


3 . 


1000 


■o 


to ; 

^4 


O0 


I 

o~» I 


4^ 

v£5 




Oi 


o 

4^ 


ro 

o 


^1 


4^ 
4^ 


0^ 


e 

EL 



■1 

er 

c 

**. 
»-• 


9 



*a 
c 

•o 

*■• 

5T 

= 

O 

er 



09 

cr 
C 

Si- 
ft 

fa 
= 

> 
ft 



List of Teachers 



-IN THE 



Ipswich Public Schools. 



John P. Marston, Principal 
Louise M. Marsh 
Elizabeth C. Ferguson 
Helen E. Sanby 
Elizabeth M. Wood 
Elizabeth P. Lewis 
Edna M. Rowell 
Lura L. Cole 
Lois V. Savage 
Georgia L. Blaisdell 
{Catherine F. Sullivan 
S. Isabelle Arthur 
L. Eva Stearns 
Leroy W. Jackman 
Emma Bell 
Helen M. Anderson 
Eva A. Willcomb 
Lilian M. MacKinnon 
Martina O'Neil 
Ether W. Archer 
Marian P. Webster 
Hazel M. Weare 



High School 



Drawing 
Winthrop School 



Linebrook 
Burley " 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT, 



83 



Nellie Sullivan 
Lydia S. Harris 
Grace M. Bowlen 
Amy Stanford 
Marguerite Houlihan 
Frances Trussel 
L. Ardell Kimball 
Annie P. Wade 
Elizabeth A. Caldwell 
Winifred M. Fleming 
B. Miriam Bryant 
Myrtle H. Cunningham 
Cora H. Jewett 
Alice K. Lockwood 
Arthur W. Gould 
Arthur H. Tozer 
Ernst Hermann 
Joseph I. Horton 



Portable " 
it <( 

Payne " 

Dennison 

<« (c 

Cogswell 

Wainwright " 
Candlewood 
Grape Island 
Domestic Science 
Manual Training 
Music 
Physical Director 
Superintendent 



Abstract from State Laws In Regard to Compulsory 

School Attendance. 

Section 1 . "Every child between seven and fourteen years 
of age, every child under sixteen years of age who does not 
possess such ability to read, write and spell in the English lan- 
guage as is required for the completion of the fourth grade of 
the public schools of the city or town in which he resides, and 
every child under sixteen years of age who has not received 
an employment certificate as provided in this act and is not en- 
gaged in some regular employment or business for at least six 



84 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



hours per day or has not the written permission of the superin- 
tendent of schools of the city or town in which he resides to 
engage in profitable employment at home, shall attend a public 
day school in said city or town or some other day school ap- 
proved by the school committee, during the entire time the pub- 
lic schools are in session, subject to such exceptions as are pro- 
vided for in sections four, five and six of this chapter." 

Section 2. "Every person having under his control a child 
described in section one shall cause him to attend school as 
therein required, and, if he fails for seven day sessions or four- 
teen half-day sessions within any period of six months while 
such control obtains, to cause such child so to attend school, he 
shall, upon complaint by an attendance officer and conviction 
thereof, be punished by a fine of not more than twenty dollars, 
and no physical or mental condition which is capable of cor- 
rection, or which renders the child a fit subject for special in- 
struction at public charge in institutions other than public day 
schools, shall avail as defence under the pre visicns of this or 
the preceeding section, unless it shall be made to appear that 
the defendant has employed all reasonable measures for the 
correction of the condition and the suitable instruction of the 
child." " 

"Whoever induces cr attempts to induce a child to absent 
himself unlawfully from school, or employs or harbors a child 
while school is in session, shall be punished by a fine of not 
less than ten nor more than fifty dollars." 



APPENDIX. 



Auditor's Report* 



To the Citizens of Ipswich: — 

I herewith submit the Annual Report 
of the Manning School, R. H. Manning, Heard and Treadwell 
Funds, as compiled from the books of their respective Treas- 
urers. I have found receipts for all bills paid and I have exam- 
ined the various Stocks and Bonds of which these various funds 
are composed and have found them to agree with the reports 
submitted. 

FREDERICK S. WITHAM, 

Auditor. 
February 12, 1919. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 87 



MANNING SCHOOL FUND. 



Receipts: 
Cash on hand January 1, 1917 $1,372 03 

Income from investments 1,004 50 



Expenditures: 
Taxes, insurance and miscellaneous expenses 

$ 641 45 
Balance on hand January 1, 1918 1,735 08 



2,376 53 



2,376 53 



Receipts: 
Cash on hand January 1, 1918 1,735 08 

Income from investments 908 50 



Expenditures: 
Taxes, insurance and miscellaneous expenses 

1,078 21 
Balance on hand. January 1, 1919 1,565 37 



2,643 58 



2,643 58 



88 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



MANNING SCHOOL FUND SECURITIES. 



12 1000 4 p.c. Peoria & Eastern 1st mtg. bonds $12000 

6 National R. Mexico 1st mtg. bonds 5000 

2 1000 5 p.c. N. E. Brick Co. bonds 2000 

1 1000 Passaic Steel Co. 1000 

Invested in Master's House 7000 

Invested in Colonial Building 18000 

45000 



R. H. MANNING FUND. 



Receipts: 
Income since last report $392 66 



R. H. MANNING FUND SECURITIES. 



Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank $5156*60 

4 1 000 Passaic Steel Co. bonds 4000 00 

33 shares Pere Marquette Railway Co. 770 00 

9926 60 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 89 



HEARD FUND OF IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Income: 

Balance on hand January I, 1918 $ 344 18 

Received from investments 850 44 

Received from Treadwell Fund 800 00 



994 62 



Expenditures: 

Salaries $ 987 45 

Insurance and miscellaneous expense 701 88 

Balance January 1, 1919 305 29 

1994 62 



SECURITIES COMPRISING HEARD FUND. 



33 shares B. & L. R. preferred stock $5846 00 

35 shares B. & M. R. 1470 00 

1 shares Fitchburg R. preferred stock 900 00 

ICB.& Q. R. 3 1-2 per cent bond 945 00 

1 United Electric & Power bond 950 00 

3 Northern Pacific Great Northern 4 per cent, bonds 2830 00 

1 Aurora, Elgin & Chicago bond 1 000 00 

3 Quincy Gas & Electric bonds 3000 00 

1 Waterloo, Cedar Falls & Northern bond 1 000 00 

Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank 2 1 6 64 

18157 64 



90 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



TREADWELL FUND. 



Receipts: 
Cash on hand January I, 1918 
Received from investments 



$ 272 53 
1663 60 

1936 13 



Expenditure: 



Sal 



alanes 



Miscellaneous expenses 

Paid Heard Fund 

Balance on hand January 1, 1919 

1 $500 Liberty Bond 



$ 50 


00 


475 


85 


800 00 


110 


28 


500 


00 



1936 13 



SECURITIES COMPRISING TREADWELL FUND. 



50 shares Fitchburg R. preferred stock 

30 shares Old Colony R. 

25 shares B. & P. R. 

25 shares M. Central 

25 shares Vt. & Mass. R. 

25 shares B. & A. R. 



$4500 00 
5215 00 
6300 00 
3080 00 
3460 00 
3990 00 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 91 



1 County Commanche, Kansas, 6 per cent, bond 

1 City of Fostoria, Ohio, 4 per cent, bond 

1 American Tel. & Tel. Co. 4 per cent, bond 

1 Aurora, Elgin & Chicago R. 5 per cent, bond 

1 Kansas Gas & Electric 5 per cent, bond 

1 Quincy Gas & Electric Heating 5 per cent, bond 

1 Waterloo, Cedar Falls & Northern bond 

Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank 966 66 

Deposited in Salem Savings Bank 750 00 

1 $1000 Missouri Pacific R. R. Co. - ™ n ™ 

2 $500 Liberty Bonds 



1000 00 

530 00 

1000 00 

1000 00 

1000 00 

950 00 

000 00 



1000 00 
1000 00 

36741 66 



In addition to the above the Trustees have received a leg- 
acy of $1000 under the will of the late Thomas H. Lord, the in- 
come of which is to be used to help enlarge the reading room 
of the Library. This amount has been invested in a $1000 
Liberty Bond. 



92 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



BURLEY EDUCATION FUND. 



The Trustees of the Burley Education Fund present herewith 
their Ninety-Third Annual Report. 

Trie Funds in their hands are as follows: 
Deposit in Ipswich Savings Bank 
Caldwell Fund in Ipswich Savings Bank 
Deposit in Salem Savinsrs Bank 
Deposit in Salem Five Cents Savings Bank 
1 5 shares common stock B. & M. R. R. Co. 
Town note 

Liberty Bonds, second issue, converted 
Liberty Bond, fourth issue 

Income for the year 1918 has been as follows: 
Ipswich Savings Bank 
Caldwell Fund 
Salem Savings Bank 
Salem Five Cents Savings Bank 
Interest on Town Notes 
Interest on Liberty Bonds, second issue 

384 80 

Expenditure consists of fifteen dollars paid the Committee 
of Minority Stockholders of B. & M. R. R. Co. 
Respectfully submitted January 1, 1919. 

John W. Nourse 
Frank T. Good 1 ue 
A. Story Brown 
Joseph T. Morton 
George W. Tozer 

Ipswich, Mass., February 6, 1919. 
I hereby certify that I have this day audited the receipts and expenditures 
of the Burley Education Fund and find that the same are correct as shown by 
the above report. FREDERICK S. WITHAM, Auditor. 



3186 97 


1105 


41 


907 


17 


1979 


96 


450 


00 


700 


00 


700 


00 


1000 


00 


10029 


51 


$132 28 


42 


90 


39 


47 


86 


15 


56 


00 


28 


00 



Trustees of the 

Burley Education Fund 

in Ipswich. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 93 



BROWN SCHOOL FUND. 



February I, 1919. 

The Trustees of the Brown School Fund present the follow- 
ing report for the year 1918. 

The Funds are as follows: 
Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank $1381 68 

Deposited in Salem Five Cents Savings Bank 1114 79 



Income since last report: 
Dividend from Ipswich Savings Bank 
Dividend from Salem Five Cents Savings Bank 



2496 47 


54 


62 


49 


39 



104 01 



Expenditures for the year: 
Transportation of the small children of the Candle- 
wood District to and from the schools in the 
center of the town 90 00 

Balance 14 01 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES G. BROWN 

A. STORY BROWN 

B. R. HORTON 

Trustees. 

Ipswich, Mass., February 6, 1919. 
1 hereby certify that I have this day audited the receipts and expenditures 
of the Brown School Fund and find that the same are correct as shown by 
the above report. FREDERICK S. W1THAM, Auditor. 



94 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



INDEX. 



Organization of School Committee Page 3 

School Expenditures 

General Expenses . 4 

Teachers* Salaries — Day School 3 

Teachers' Salaries — Evening School 7 

Text Books and Supplies 7 

Transportation 9 

Janitor Service 9 

Fuel and Light 10 

Buildings and Grounds 11 

Furniture and Furnishings 12 

Rent 12 

Diplomas and Graduating Exercises 13 

Insurance 13 

Report of the School Committee 14 

Report of the Superintendent 16 

Physical Training 22 

Art Exhibits 23 

School Exhibit 24 

Promotions, Diplomas and Certificates of 

Attendance 24 

Two Sessions for the Senior High School. . . .25 

Salaries 27 

Candlewood School 28 

Branch Libraries '29 

Courses for Evening School Teachers 29 

Teachers' Meetings 29 

No School Signals 29 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 95 



Penny Savings Page 30 

Repairs and Improvements 32 

Teachers' Classes 33 

Dental Clinic 33 

Lectures — Excursions 33 

School Orchestra — Glee Club 34 

War Activities 34 

Community Chorus 35 

Child Welfare Work 35 

Night School 36 

The High School 37 

Recommendations 

(1.) Wiring the Manning Building for 

Electric Lighting 41 

(2.) Relaying Two Floors in the Man- 
ning Building 42 

(3.) More Rational Method of Instruc- 
tion for Defective Children 42 

(4.) A New Fence on the Eastern 

Boundary 42 

(5.) Straightening the Rear Line Fence. . .43 

(6,) Sanitary Conditions at the Payne 

and Cogswell Schools 43 

(7.) Change of Text Book 43 

(8.) Change Recommended in Age 

Limit for School Attendance 44 

Budget 44 

Acknowledgments 45 

Junior High School 46 

Home Gardens .49 

Club Work 51 

Domestic Science 52 



96 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Sewing Department Page 54 

Report of the Junior Red Cross. 56 

Manual Training 57 

Drawing Department „ 58 

Music Report 61' 

Physical Education 64 

Department of Medical Inspection 2 

Attendance Officer's Report 75 

School Calendar for 1919 77 

High School Enrollment ... 77 

Program Forty-Fourth Annual Commencement . . 7& 

Class of 1918 79 

Vital Statistics ... 80 

Distribution of Pupils 81 

List of Teachers 82 

Abstracts from State Laws 83 

Manning School Fund 87 

R. H. Manning Fund 88> 

Heard Fund 89 

Treadwell Fund 90 

Burley Fund 92 

Brown School Fund 93 



I 



J 



A 



y 



T OP \ 

IPSWICH ROOM 

Ipswich Public Library 

hswich, Massachusetts 






IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 2122 00162 008 1 






D